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Debates Forum

  1. 18 Jul '10 08:24
    Should the morality of an act be judged more by its motivation or its consequences?
  2. 18 Jul '10 08:26
    Consequences.
  3. 18 Jul '10 08:38
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Consequences.
    Even though the precise consequences of many actions are likely to be unforeseeable at the time?
  4. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    18 Jul '10 08:44
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Should the morality of an act be judged more by its motivation or its consequences?
    Motivation.

    Your morality, the code by which you live is a reflection of your values.
  5. 18 Jul '10 08:46
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Even though the precise consequences of many actions are likely to be unforeseeable at the time?
    If the consequences could not have reasonably be foreseen, then the "offender" is not to blame. If bad consequences could have been foreseen, but they were worse than could have reasonably been expected, then the "offender" is partially to blame.
  6. 18 Jul '10 10:10
    Originally posted by Wajoma
    Motivation.

    Your morality, the code by which you live is a reflection of your values.
    But that would mean that the same action, with the same observable effect on yourself and others, could be good or evil depending on the unobservable, intangible issue of motivation. That seems a bit odd.
  7. Standard member DrKF
    incipit parodia
    18 Jul '10 10:12
    Oooh. Consequentialism and deontology! This should be enlightening.
  8. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    18 Jul '10 10:18
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    But that would mean that the same action, with the same observable effect on yourself and others, could be good or evil depending on the unobservable, intangible issue of motivation. That seems a bit odd.
    The motivation may be unobservable to you, but not to the individual themself.

    Above all else be true to thine own self.
  9. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    18 Jul '10 10:20
    Originally posted by DrKF
    Oooh. Consequentialism and deontology! This should be enlightening.
    Clearly your comment is not.
  10. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    18 Jul '10 10:57
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Should the morality of an act be judged more by its motivation or its consequences?
    motivation

    else the midwife who delivered Hitler could be considered immoral
  11. 18 Jul '10 11:42 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Should the morality of an act be judged more by its motivation or its consequences?
    Its like asking if we are influenced by our environment or our genes. Guess what, its both!!

    A better question is, what is such morality based upon? Who should be crowned "the judge".
  12. 18 Jul '10 12:38
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    motivation

    else the midwife who delivered Hitler could be considered immoral
    Not if you use the knowledge-of-consequences viewpoint that I posited in this thread.
  13. 18 Jul '10 13:58
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Should the morality of an act be judged more by its motivation or its consequences?
    Both. The act itself may be deemed moral or immoral based on the known or suspected consequences, the action of the actor may be deemed moral or immoral based on his motivation.
  14. 18 Jul '10 16:38
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    If the consequences could not have reasonably be foreseen, then the "offender" is not to blame. If bad consequences could have been foreseen, but they were worse than could have reasonably been expected, then the "offender" is partially to blame.
    So the offender is not to blame if the "bad" consequences could not have been forseen?

    First of all, who defines what is bad? For example, someone gave the example of the mother giving birth to Hitler. Lets suppose for a minute she could see into the future. Perhaps his mother thought that Jews were the source of all evil in the world. If that is the case perhaps she would deem it "good" to give birth to him. Her motives and consequences could then be interpreted as "good".
  15. 18 Jul '10 16:40
    Originally posted by Wajoma
    Motivation.

    Your morality, the code by which you live is a reflection of your values.
    I am reminded of the saying, "The road to hell is paved with good intentions".

    For example, the globalists come to mind. Their motivation may be to create a one world government with the motivation of ending war. Sounds great doesn't it!!

    Of course, we can both see the folly of such an outcome can't we?