Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Joined
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    12 Mar '18 19:41
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were both unpopular candidates.
    How do such unpopular candidates win the nominations to their political parties if the USA is really a democracy? Isn't this really an indication of a lack of democracy?
  2. Standard membervivify
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    12 Mar '18 21:321 edit
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were both unpopular candidates.
    How do such unpopular candidates win the nominations to their political parties if the USA is really a democracy? Isn't this really an indication of a lack of democracy?
    Rigging elections is also a thing, which there was evidence of against Hillary when when she ran against Bernie. There are also people who supported Hillary because they wanted to see a female president in their lifetime, more than see the best candidate win. She also had name recognition, and some Dems voted for her thinking she was a safer choice to defeat Trump, rather than an unknown like Bernie. Hillary also was also in the pocket of Big Business (most notoriously, Wall Street), which helped her campaign financially; meanwhile, Bernie was highly unpopular with Big Business, Wall Street, Big Pharma, etc., because he preached against greed and unrestrained capitalism. They played their part to make sure Bernie didn't win.

    Trump was wildly popular white conservatives, which is why he killed in the Republican Primaries. Trump's appeal: he's open about his bigotry, which was a breath of fresh of air for conservatives.

    And, of course, Americans are bloody brainless fcking morons. Americans are easily influenced by media, possess no ability for objective or rational thinking, vote with emotion, and are pig ignorant dipshlts who can't handle grown-up debates without two-minute limits and snappy one-liners.
  3. Subscriberno1marauder
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    12 Mar '18 21:39
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were both unpopular candidates.
    How do such unpopular candidates win the nominations to their political parties if the USA is really a democracy? Isn't this really an indication of a lack of democracy?
    Both won the majority of their party's primaries generally by solid margins.

    That they were the party's nominees is certainly not any indication of a lack of democracy.
  4. Joined
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    12 Mar '18 21:44
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were both unpopular candidates.
    How do such unpopular candidates win the nominations to their political parties if the USA is really a democracy? Isn't this really an indication of a lack of democracy?
    Only the uber corrupt are capable at attaining the highest office.
  5. Standard membershavixmir
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    12 Mar '18 21:45
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were both unpopular candidates.
    How do such unpopular candidates win the nominations to their political parties if the USA is really a democracy? Isn't this really an indication of a lack of democracy?
    Money.
  6. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    13 Mar '18 02:49
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were both unpopular candidates.
    How do such unpopular candidates win the nominations to their political parties if the USA is really a democracy? Isn't this really an indication of a lack of democracy?
    There's a considerable gap between unpopular and unacceptable.
  7. Joined
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    15 Mar '18 13:48
    Originally posted by @no1marauder
    Both won the majority of their party's primaries generally by solid margins.

    That they were the party's nominees is certainly not any indication of a lack of democracy.
    What about the DNC giving electorial delegates to Hillary even though Bernie Sanders got more votes like in Michigan? Isn't that a lack of democracy?
  8. Joined
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    15 Mar '18 13:49
    Originally posted by @handyandy
    There's a considerable gap between unpopular and unacceptable.
    Wouldn't Run-off voting close that gap?
  9. Standard membervivify
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    15 Mar '18 14:17
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    What about the DNC giving electorial delegates to Hillary even though Bernie Sanders got more votes like in Michigan? Isn't that a lack of democracy?
    The primaries don't use a winner-take-all system. Unlike electoral votes, delegates from a state are split in the primaries between the candidates, depending on what percentage of votes were received.
  10. Joined
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    15 Mar '18 16:22
    Originally posted by @vivify
    The primaries don't use a winner-take-all system. Unlike electoral votes, delegates from a state are split in the primaries between the candidates, depending on what percentage of votes were received.
    Not in Michigan. Sanders got more votes, yet Hillary got most of the superdelegates.

    https://ballotpedia.org/Superdelegates_from_Michigan,_2016
  11. Standard membervivify
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    15 Mar '18 16:341 edit
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    Not in Michigan. Sanders got more votes, yet Hillary got most of the superdelegates.

    https://ballotpedia.org/Superdelegates_from_Michigan,_2016
    So it was the superdelegates who chose Clinton.

    Between the Electoral College, superdelegates, and gerrymandering, there is no democracy in the US.
  12. Joined
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    15 Mar '18 17:211 edit
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were both unpopular candidates.
    How do such unpopular candidates win the nominations to their political parties if the USA is really a democracy? Isn't this really an indication of a lack of democracy?
    That's nothing.

    Congress has had an approval rating hovering under 20% for decades, yet they still keep getting elected anyway.

    I think you will find that the two party system has a great many tricks and traps to secure power for the most hated of candidates.

    Congressmen like Schumer and Pelosi and McCain have become nothing more than cartoon characters. They are beyond corrupt. Just look at what they earn as a Congressman and then look at how much they are worth for proof.
  13. Subscriberno1marauder
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    15 Mar '18 20:59
    Originally posted by @metal-brain
    What about the DNC giving electorial delegates to Hillary even though Bernie Sanders got more votes like in Michigan? Isn't that a lack of democracy?
    Superdelegates didn't change the result in 2016.
  14. Joined
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    15 Mar '18 21:23
    Originally posted by @vivify
    So it was the superdelegates who chose Clinton.

    Between the Electoral College, superdelegates, and gerrymandering, there is no democracy in the US.
    More complaints about symptoms. None of these are the real problem.

    Between FPTP and... FPTP!, there's no democracy in the USA.

    But hey, by all means keep treating tuberculosis with cough drops and clean hankies.
  15. Standard membervivify
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    15 Mar '18 21:53
    Originally posted by @shallow-blue
    More complaints about symptoms. None of these are the real problem.

    Between FPTP and... FPTP!, there's no democracy in the USA.

    But hey, by all means keep treating tuberculosis with cough drops and clean hankies.
    All of those contribute to the "real problem" of robbing democracy.

    But hey, a pseudo-intellectual post that offers no solutions felt good to say, right?
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