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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 25 Jan '18 16:51
    Here is your chance to write policy. What should the rule of law be on immigration?

    Is everyone welcome or only certain people?
  2. 25 Jan '18 16:59
    Originally posted by @whodey
    Here is your chance to write policy. What should the rule of law be on immigration?

    Is everyone welcome or only certain people?
    You apply. Do the proper paperwork. Know the language. Come in LEGALLY as did my relatives coming to the USA in the early 1900's.
  3. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    25 Jan '18 17:01
    Originally posted by @whodey
    Here is your chance to write policy. What should the rule of law be on immigration?

    Is everyone welcome or only certain people?
    Complete open borders.
    One world for all of us.

    Sure, one can think of a million problems with it, but the problems now are just as many.

    In the begin there will be a couple of mass shifts in population, but quickly that will settle down.
    And this process will lead to a form of global equality; no more child labour, the rich-poor divide will decrease (depending on how it goes, you might end up with a few mega-rich folk), costs saved on border controls and the like can be re-allocated to more important issues such as health and food.

    Imagine no countries! How weird would that be?
  4. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    25 Jan '18 17:01
    Originally posted by @whodey
    Here is your chance to write policy. What should the rule of law be on immigration?

    Is everyone welcome or only certain people?
    Only Norwegians.
  5. 25 Jan '18 17:08
    Originally posted by @whodey
    Here is your chance to write policy. What should the rule of law be on immigration?

    Is everyone welcome or only certain people?
    The policy we have is just fine. Only thing is, we are not abiding by it. Due to politicians, dem and repub equally have allowed employers to dictate immigration policy.
  6. 25 Jan '18 17:10
    Originally posted by @shavixmir
    Complete open borders.
    One world for all of us.

    Sure, one can think of a million problems with it, but the problems now are just as many.

    In the begin there will be a couple of mass shifts in population, but quickly that will settle down.
    And this process will lead to a form of global equality; no more child labour, the rich-poor divide will decre ...[text shortened]... more important issues such as health and food.

    Imagine no countries! How weird would that be?
    The only problem with your premise is HUMANS.
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    25 Jan '18 17:14
    Free travel for Hispanics within the former Spanish Empire. American Indians too. Mexicans are both.
  8. 25 Jan '18 17:30
    Originally posted by @whodey
    Here is your chance to write policy. What should the rule of law be on immigration?

    Is everyone welcome or only certain people?
    Stop those people that pose a credible threat. Allow others to travel, work and trade as they wish without discriminating with respect to ideology, creed, gender, appearance, nationality, etc.
  9. 25 Jan '18 17:32 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @kquinn909
    You apply. Do the proper paperwork. Know the language. Come in LEGALLY as did my relatives coming to the USA in the early 1900's.
    It was far easier in the early 1900s to migrate to the U.S. than it is today. Do you think that migrating to the U.S. should become easier so that illegal immigration is reduced in favour of legal immigration?

    PS: many of the people who migrated to the U.S. legally in the early 1900s spoke no or poor English.
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    25 Jan '18 18:40
    Originally posted by @kazetnagorra
    It was far easier in the early 1900s to migrate to the U.S. than it is today.
    Only for whites though.
  11. 25 Jan '18 19:18
    Originally posted by @kquinn909
    You apply. Do the proper paperwork. Know the language. Come in LEGALLY as did my relatives coming to the USA in the early 1900's.
    Did they ask the Cherokee? Or only the fat, gum-chewing wannabe-Italian behind the desk at whatevet has replaced Ellis Island?
  12. 25 Jan '18 19:31 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @athousandyoung
    Only for whites though.
    Always easier for the intelligent ones.
  13. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    25 Jan '18 20:15
    Originally posted by @mott-the-hoople
    Always easier for the intelligent ones.
    Nope Chinese and Japanese who test better on IQ tests weren’t allowed or were very restricted.
  14. 25 Jan '18 20:24
    Originally posted by @athousandyoung
    Nope Chinese and Japanese who test better on IQ tests weren’t allowed or were very restricted.
    Wasn't intelligent enough to beat us here.
  15. 25 Jan '18 20:47 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @kazetnagorra to Kquinn909
    It was far easier in the early 1900s to migrate to the U.S. than it is today.
    Do you think that migrating to the U.S. should become easier so that illegal immigration
    is reduced in favour of legal immigration?

    PS: many of the people who migrated to the U.S. legally in the early 1900s spoke no or poor English.
    "It was far easier in the early 1900s to migrate to the U.S. than it is today."
    --KazetNagorra

    NOT for people from the world's most populous country (with 20-25% of the world's population).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Exclusion_Act

    "The Chinese Exclusion Act was a United States federal law signed by President
    Chester A. Arthur on May 6, 1882, prohibiting all immigration of Chinese laborers."

    Given his earlier comments in another thread, KazetNagorra apparently likes to act as
    though the Chinese Exclusion Act never existed or had no importance because it did not
    affect 'real people', meaning white Europeans.