Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 18 Dec '09 19:42
    Besides to create an uniform currency and allowing massive immigration from Eastern Europe and Turkey?
  2. 18 Dec '09 19:45
    Originally posted by EmLasker
    Besides to create an uniform currency and allowing massive immigration from Eastern Europe and Turkey?
    to takeover the world, and force everyone to speak french.
  3. 18 Dec '09 20:12
    Originally posted by EmLasker
    What's the point of EU?
    What's the point of USA?
  4. 18 Dec '09 20:37
    Originally posted by EmLasker
    Besides to create an uniform currency and allowing massive immigration from Eastern Europe and Turkey?
    Turkey is not a member. For an answer to your question I will refer you to "Economics for Dummies".
  5. 18 Dec '09 20:41
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Turkey is not a member.
    Turkey is not a member. Yet.

    Whenever they've solved the Kurd question, the Cyprus matter, and turn to democracy of western style - then they have an easier time to be a member in EU.
  6. 18 Dec '09 20:57
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Turkey is not a member. Yet.

    Whenever they've solved the Kurd question, the Cyprus matter, and turn to democracy of western style - then they have an easier time to be a member in EU.
    I'd like to see them join but I would be surprised to see it happen before 2030.
  7. 18 Dec '09 21:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I'd like to see them join but I would be surprised to see it happen before 2030.
    Turkey is not in Europe in the first place (except for a small part at our side of the strait). Their capitol city definitely not.

    If Turkey is let into EU, what will next country be? Israel? Oh no...
  8. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    19 Dec '09 05:46
    Originally posted by EmLasker
    What's the point of EU?
    One 'point' is to prevent any more wars between Germany and France. It has been successful in that respect. There were three between 1870 and 1945 and none since 1945. Europe had been a battlefield in almost constant use for centuries and there were wars in the Balkans (again) in the 1990s. Wars between E.U. members are now inconceivable, I'd say.
  9. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    19 Dec '09 05:48
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    What's the point of USA?
    Mutual defense originally.
  10. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    19 Dec '09 05:55
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Turkey is not in Europe in the first place (except for a small part at our side of the strait).
    Is this relevant? If Turkey joins the E.U. it will be part of Europe in a whole range of ways that trumps arbitary delineations of continents.
  11. 19 Dec '09 08:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FMF
    Is this relevant? If Turkey joins the E.U. it will be part of Europe in a whole range of ways that trumps arbitary delineations of continents.
    There is an inside Europe, and there is an outside Europe. The borders are there traditionally since a long time ago. You cannot decide what's Europe by the members of EU. Then is Schweitz a part of Europe or not?

    There are countries in the world wich is closer to the spirit of Europe than Turkey. New Zealand, as one example. They merit a membership more than Turkey. But I would say no to them too. Why? They are not Europeans in the first place. So aren't the turks.

    Turkey has so many internal problems they have to solve first before I even consider them to be members of the EU. When they've solved them, it's time to talk about a membership. Not before.
  12. 19 Dec '09 08:22
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Mutual defense originally.
    I don't think it is originaly. The point was (correct me if I'm wrong) that the states was stronger in many ways, not only military, when joined.

    So is EU. That's the same point with united European countries today.

    Originally was to ensure peace within Europe. And there have always been peace within the EU since.
  13. 19 Dec '09 08:24 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    There is an inside Europe, and there is an outside Europe. The borders are there traditionally since a long time ago. You cannot decide what's Europe by the members of EU. Then is Schweitz a part of Europe or not?

    There are countries in the world wich is closer to the spirit of Europe than Turkey. New Zealand, as one example. They merit a membership mo mbers of the EU. When they've solved them, it's time to talk about a membership. Not before.
    You appear to be contradicting yourself here. You say that Turkey can't join because they aren't in Europe. In the next paragraph you say they can join if they meet the necessary criteria. Which is it?

    As for myself, I don't really give a toss about whether or not they have a "European culture", whatever that means. Turkey is a large country with a large population and a large potential for economic growth and development. An EU membership would boost this growth, and rich EU countries can benefit from it.

    I also don't see why New Zealand shouldn't be able to join.
  14. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    19 Dec '09 08:33
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    There is an inside Europe, and there is an outside Europe. The borders are there traditionally since a long time ago. You cannot decide what's Europe by the members of EU.
    The "borders" of continents determine the colours on maps in an atlas. Nothing more or less. If Turkey joins the E.U. it will be de facto part of Europe. or, I should say, even more part of Europe than it already is. A large swathe of Europe was ruled from Istanbul for hundreds of years.
  15. 19 Dec '09 09:46
    Originally posted by FMF
    The "borders" of continents determine the colours on maps in an atlas. Nothing more or less.
    No, it's not. A small part of Turkey belongs to Europe already, even if most of Turkey is in Asia. Same goes for Russia, most of it is in Asia (east of the Urals), the western part of Russia is European.