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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 09 Oct '10 16:27
    I hear talk on this forum of the 'Tea Party' but I hear very little about Tea Party candidates in the Main Stream Media. Why is this? Does anyone have a list of candidates that I can research before voting?
  2. 09 Oct '10 20:57
    Originally posted by TerrierJack
    I hear talk on this forum of the 'Tea Party' but I hear very little about Tea Party candidates in the Main Stream Media. Why is this? Does anyone have a list of candidates that I can research before voting?
    Well, you won't find any of them at a library. Not sure, where do uneducated racist homophobes hang out?
  3. 09 Oct '10 22:01
    "Tea Party members fit the general description of what we think of as old-school Republicans. Only they don’t like to be cast that way. In their eyes, Republicans already in Washington are part of the problem, so they’re more comfortable being seen as insurgents within the one party where they’ll have more pull.

    But looking over the list of Tea Party-backed candidates for the U.S. Senate who will face off against Democrats in November, what’s striking is how conventional many of them actually look. Just like the current Congress, most are lawyers and some have established political careers. Business executives and entrepreneurs, they’re not:"

    Joe Miller, Alaska: Miller went after Murkowski with gusto during the primary. The 43-year-old lawyer and former U.S. magistrate is a West Point graduate, veteran of the first Gulf War, and holder of an economics masters degree from the University of Alaska. He tried his hand at elective politics once before, when he ran unsuccessfully for the state House.

    Sharon Angle, Nevada: Every election has a potential giant killer, and Angle is this cycle’s prospect. She defeated an establishment GOP candidate for the right to challenge Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Angle, 61, spent six years in the Nevada state Assembly and has been a longtime substitute school teacher.

    Mike Lee, Utah: Lee didn’t knock off the incumbent, Bennett. That honor was left to the state Republican party, which failed to endorse him during their convention, essentially ending his run. Lee, 39, later won a primary against Tim Bridgewater to lay claim to the GOP nomination. Lee is a constitutional lawyer who has served stints as general counsel to Utah’s governor and as a law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito.

    Marco Rubio, Florida: Rubio didn’t defeat an incumbent. No, he forced the favored Republican candidate—Governor Charlie Crist—out of the party entirely. Crist is now running as an independent in a three-way race. Rubio, 39, is a lawyer with a long political history. He was a member of the Florida House for nearly a decade and spent two years as House Speaker.

    Ken Buck, Colorado: Buck defeated Jane Norton, a former lieutenant governor in the August 10 primary. Buck is a lawyer who worked in Washington before as a prosecutor with the Justice Department. Most recently, he was district attorney of Weld County, Colorado. This November, Buck is trying to defeat incumbent Democratic Senator Michael Bennet.

    Rand Paul, Kentucky: Paul is an ophthalmologist who has never held political office. But he does come from a political family—his dad, Ron Paul, is a Republican congressman from Texas who ran for president in 2008—and he has been active in libertarian and tax-relief causes. Paul has stirred controversy with remarks suggesting that private business owners should be allowed to discriminate.


    Read more: http://www.portfolio.com/views/blogs/capital/2010/09/01/tea-party-senate-candidates-well-positioned-to-win-in-november#ixzz11twb9re6
  4. 09 Oct '10 23:38
    Originally posted by utherpendragon
    "Tea Party members fit the general description of what we think of as old-school Republicans. Only they don’t like to be cast that way. In their eyes, Republicans already in Washington are part of the problem, so they’re more comfortable being seen as insurgents within the one party where they’ll have more pull.

    But looking over the list of Tea Par ...[text shortened]... apital/2010/09/01/tea-party-senate-candidates-well-positioned-to-win-in-november#ixzz11twb9re6
    But looking over the list of Tea Party-backed candidates for the U.S. Senate who will face off against Democrats in November, what’s striking is how conventional many of them actually look. Just like the current Congress, most are lawyers and some have established political careers. Business executives and entrepreneurs, they’re not:"

    so, despite all the hype, it would seem that the Tea Party candidates are actually NOT likely to change the way things are done in Washington?
  5. 09 Oct '10 23:59
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    [b]But looking over the list of Tea Party-backed candidates for the U.S. Senate who will face off against Democrats in November, what’s striking is how conventional many of them actually look. Just like the current Congress, most are lawyers and some have established political careers. Business executives and entrepreneurs, they’re not:"

    so, despit ...[text shortened]... e Tea Party candidates are actually NOT likely to change the way things are done in Washington?[/b]
    Who knows for sure? I don't. Only time will tell.
  6. 10 Oct '10 00:30
    Originally posted by utherpendragon
    Who knows for sure? I don't. Only time will tell.
    All I know is that we do this dance pretty much every election cycle. A bevy of candidates declares that they are Outsiders who will Change the way things are Done in Washington. Lots of corny slogans and classless ads fill the airwaves. Voters full of Anger and-or Hope cast their votes. But it soon becomes clear that these Outsiders are no different from the people that were kicked out.

    So along comes a new bevy of candidates who declare that they are Outsiders who will Change the way things are Done in Washington.

    Can't we at least change the dance? Let's have an election cycle where everyone just admits that they're Insiders who love Washington and not much will change. At least then, we'd know we were electing people willing to tell the truth. Maybe then we'd actually see real changes.
  7. 10 Oct '10 00:36
    One thing I'm covinced of, members of congress love their jobs. Once on the inside, their motivation becomes only to hang around as long as possible.
  8. 10 Oct '10 02:25
    Originally posted by badmoon
    One thing I'm covinced of, members of congress love their jobs. Once on the inside, their motivation becomes only to hang around as long as possible.
    Which is why they need term limits.
  9. 10 Oct '10 02:41
    Originally posted by TerrierJack
    I hear talk on this forum of the 'Tea Party' but I hear very little about Tea Party candidates in the Main Stream Media. Why is this? Does anyone have a list of candidates that I can research before voting?
    the Main Stream Media needs boogeyman. they don't need to be giving free advertising to candidates. better to keep them anonymous.
  10. 11 Oct '10 01:33
    Originally posted by whodey
    Which is why they need term limits.
    Who supports term limits? I remember talk about that in the past but it must have come form the mouths of liars because nothing ever came of it. Does anyone support it now?
  11. 11 Oct '10 01:36
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    the Main Stream Media needs boogeyman. they don't need to be giving free advertising to candidates. better to keep them anonymous.
    Actually I've heard a great deal in the MSM about those listed but hardly anything at all about the Nevada candidate running as a member of the Tea Party. All those listed were Republicans and whodey told me they were all liars. Why would I be interested in liars? Where are the real Tea Party candidates?
  12. 11 Oct '10 18:27 / 1 edit
    Actually it's not a political party with candidates. Surely you know that?

    I nkow, don't call you Surely.