Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
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    2120
    26 Sep '17 20:461 edit
    First of all, some Saudi Arabian women already have been driving motor
    vehicles, such as when traveling abroad or in remote areas of Saudi Arabia,
    where there's practically no enforcement of that law.

    I predicted that women would get the right to drive in Saudi Arabia before very long.
    It was a matter of timing, waiting to placate some conservative religious men.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/26/saudi-arabias-king-issues-order-allowing-women-to-drive

    "Saudi Arabia's king issues order allowing women to drive:
    King Salman ordered the reform in a royal decree delivered on Tuesday night,
    requesting that drivers licences be issued to women who wanted them."

    "Saudi Arabia had been the last country in the world in which women were banned from
    driving – a fact that was frequently used by critics as proof that female citizens of the
    kingdom were among the world’s most repressed.

    The most recent campaign to allow women drivers started in Saudi Arabia around 10 years ago,
    and reached a peak in 2013, when several women who had sat behind the wheel on the country’s roads were briefly arrested by police."

    "Earlier this month, a Saudi cleric was *banned from preaching* after
    saying that women should not be allowed to drive because their brains
    shrink to quarter the size of a man’s when they go shopping."

    Should that Saudi cleric have the right to preach that sexist nonsense?
  2. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    26 Sep '17 20:57
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/23/saudi-cleric-saad-al-hijri-banned-woman-driving-cars-quarter-brain

    "Saudi cleric banned for saying women's brains 'a quarter the size' of men's.
    Saad al-Hijri suspended from all religious activity for saying women should not drive
    because their brains shrink after shopping."

    "Saad al-Hijri, head of fatwas (legal opinions) in Saudi Arabia’s Assir governorate, was
    suspended from all religious activity after advising against allowing women to drive in a
    speech that contained comments “diminishing human value”,"

    "The comments sparked outrage on social media, which is hugely popular in the kingdom.
    Twitter users shared the video, many criticising it and making jokes about his remarks, under
    the Arabic hashtag “Al-Hijri-women-quarter-brain”. The hashtag was used 119,000 times in just 24 hours.
    Some users posted pictures of Saudi female scientists and academics in response and
    questioned Hijri’s own intellectual capacities."
  3. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    26 Sep '17 21:01
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/jun/12/i-felt-like-one-of-my-fathers-songbirds-let-out-of-its-cage-driving-as-a-woman-in-saudi-Arabia

    "‘I felt like one of my father’s songbirds, let out of its cage’: driving as a woman in Saudi Arabia"
    --Manal al-Sharif

    "In 2011, as the Arab spring brewed, I began a campaign to allow women to drive in Saudi Arabia,
    mobilising them via Twitter and Facebook. I thought that if someone posted a video of a
    woman driving, it might “normalise” the experience and show Saudi citizens there was
    nothing dangerous about it. I also wanted to prove that many of us already knew how to
    drive – that we had licences and even cars. And I wanted to prove that the Saudi authorities
    would not stop a female driver."
  4. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    26 Sep '17 21:05
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/02/saudi-prince-reforms-society-rigid-youth-restless

    "Saudi society is rigid, its youth restless. The prince’s reforms need to succeed .
    The kingdom’s vast privatisation programme is as significant for its social consequences
    as it is for the riches on offer to investment bankers."

    "An absolute monarchy with a bloated, inefficient public sector, a huge government payroll
    and a resistance to change was never going to be an easy target. Add to that a mindset
    of entitlement among many Saudi young people and low productivity, and the challenges
    seem close to insurmountable. Central to the young prince’s plan is unlocking wealth and
    giving its citizens a buy-in. As sweeteners, he has also thrown in cultural reforms, such as
    opening cinemas, promoting concerts and other enhancements to social life that many Saudis crave."

    "More than 60% of the Saudi population is aged under 30 and among that demographic
    are large numbers of disenfranchised youngsters dissatisfied with the current social
    contract, which is bound up in rigidly conservative rules governing social interactions.
    Entertainment and fraternisation are mostly outlawed. Jobs are few, and often menial.
    There are fears that in the absence of credible alternatives, extremist groups may provide a lure."
  5. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
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    26 Sep '17 21:12
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/02/saudi-prince-reforms-society-rigid-youth-restless

    "Saudi society is rigid, its youth restless. The prince’s reforms need to succeed .
    The kingdom’s vast privatisation programme is as significant for its social consequences
    as it is for the riches on offer to investment bankers."

    "An absolute monarchy w ...[text shortened]... re are fears that in the absence of credible alternatives, extremist groups may provide a lure."
    And what are they going to do when oil no longer is the mainstay of civilization, that job going to renewables? Will there be a new Jihad and a renewed ISIS like organization?
  6. Stargazing
    Joined
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    26 Sep '17 21:17
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/02/saudi-prince-reforms-society-rigid-youth-restless

    "Saudi society is rigid, its youth restless. The prince’s reforms need to succeed .
    The kingdom’s vast privatisation programme is as significant for its social consequences
    as it is for the riches on offer to investment bankers."

    "An absolute monarchy w ...[text shortened]... re are fears that in the absence of credible alternatives, extremist groups may provide a lure."
    Four "Guardian" links. Just pointing it out πŸ˜΅πŸ˜‰
  7. Joined
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    281587
    27 Sep '17 01:27
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    First of all, some Saudi Arabian women already have been driving motor
    vehicles, such as when traveling abroad or in remote areas of Saudi Arabia,
    where there's practically no enforcement of that law.

    I predicted that women would get the right to drive in Saudi Arabia before very long.
    It was a matter of timing, waiting to placate some conservative ...[text shortened]... en they go shopping."

    Should that Saudi cleric have the right to preach that sexist nonsense?
    I think you should I've there. You can enlighten the women. And get stoned to death. Ain't talking pot either.πŸ˜›
  8. Standard membershavixmir
    Guppy poo
    Sewers of Holland
    Joined
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    27 Sep '17 04:40
    There's a Dutch saying: "vrouw achter het stuur, bloed aan de muur."

    Which literally translates as: "woman behind the steering wheel, blood on the wall."

    I don't think women should drive cars.*
    But, to be honest, I don't think men under 35 or over 52 should be allowed on the roads either.

    Traffic jams solved!


    * except for my wife when I'm drunk.
  9. Standard membershavixmir
    Guppy poo
    Sewers of Holland
    Joined
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    27 Sep '17 04:41
    Originally posted by @kquinn909
    I think you should I've there. You can enlighten the women. And get stoned to death. Ain't talking pot either.πŸ˜›
    You certainly sound like you smoke pot though.
  10. Behind the scenes
    Joined
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    27 Sep '17 05:02
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    First of all, some Saudi Arabian women already have been driving motor
    vehicles, such as when traveling abroad or in remote areas of Saudi Arabia,
    where there's practically no enforcement of that law.

    I predicted that women would get the right to drive in Saudi Arabia before very long.
    It was a matter of timing, waiting to placate some conservative ...[text shortened]... en they go shopping."

    Should that Saudi cleric have the right to preach that sexist nonsense?
    Should that Saudi cleric have the right to preach that sexist nonsense?


    If you're speaking of his legal right, that would depend on the country he is a citizen of, and the laws in that country. If you're speaking of his moral or ethical right, that opens up a number of questions: Should a person have the right to insult another? What constitutes an insult? Is saying something stupid and abrasive morally wrong? What constitutes stupid and abrasive? etc. I think several large volumes could be devoted to this.
  11. Joined
    02 Jan '06
    Moves
    10087
    27 Sep '17 11:441 edit
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    First of all, some Saudi Arabian women already have been driving motor
    vehicles, such as when traveling abroad or in remote areas of Saudi Arabia,
    where there's practically no enforcement of that law.

    I predicted that women would get the right to drive in Saudi Arabia before very long.
    It was a matter of timing, waiting to placate some conservative ...[text shortened]... en they go shopping."

    Should that Saudi cleric have the right to preach that sexist nonsense?
    So if they get pulled over for speeding do they get stoned?

    The hard part will be driving with a giant hijab covering the car.
  12. Subscriberjoe shmo
    Strange Egg
    podunk, PA
    Joined
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    7733
    27 Sep '17 12:45
    Driving with a Hijab? How are they going to safely drive with such a narrow field of view?
  13. Joined
    02 Jan '06
    Moves
    10087
    27 Sep '17 14:122 edits
    Originally posted by @joe-shmo
    Driving with a Hijab? How are they going to safely drive with such a narrow field of view?
    Cut a little slit for their eyes on the windshield like they do for their head.

    The only question will be, can they choose a different color than black?

    Na, the misogynist Muslims will probably stick to black to make it that much more hot for their women.
  14. Joined
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    281587
    27 Sep '17 15:26
    Originally posted by @shavixmir
    You certainly sound like you smoke pot though.
    A puff at nite after a hard days work to help my appetite. You? Alright. Gotta go help build a hospital and pay taxes for the welfare bums/commies.
  15. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
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    52855
    27 Sep '17 16:29
    Originally posted by @kquinn909
    I think you should I've there. You can enlighten the women. And get stoned to death. Ain't talking pot either.πŸ˜›
    My parents and brother did exactly that. Brother came home in a big hurry with jihadists on his heelπŸ™‚ Parents came home at end of contract.
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