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  1. 21 Jun '09 22:23 / 3 edits
    I just read that world hunger has hit the one billion mark. That's right that means 1 in 6 people in the world are now going hungry.

    Of course, I am sure every once cares to some degree, some more than others, but what should be done about it if anything?

    Soaring prices of staples, such as rice, triggored riots in the developing world last year. In fact, at least 30 riots were recorded last year. Most notable, soaring food prices led to deadly riots in Haiti and the overthrow of the Prime Minister. As we can see, the crisis has both political and humanitarian implications. In short, the political stability across the globe is gaining ground.

    Edit: Sorry, don't have the link with me, I just read it on Yahoo news the other day. I'm sure you can find it if interested.
  2. Standard member yo its me
    watch the acid...
    21 Jun '09 22:29
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just read that world hunger has hit the one billion mark. That's right that means 1 in 6 people in the world are now going hungry.

    Of course, I am sure every once cares to some degree, some more than others, but what should be done about it if anything?

    Edit: Sorry, don't have the link with me, I just read it on Yahoo news the other day. I'm sure you can find it if intereted.
    That is an obseen amount of people. Isn't one in 5 obeese too?
  3. 21 Jun '09 22:37 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by yo its me
    That is an obseen amount of people. Isn't one in 5 obeese too?
    There you go. I figure if you take the one in five obese people on the globe you could probably take their respecitve meals and slash the one in 6 number going hungry by at least half. Brilliant!!
  4. 21 Jun '09 22:43
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just read that world hunger has hit the one billion mark. That's right that means 1 in 6 people in the world are now going hungry.

    Of course, I am sure every once cares to some degree, some more than others, but what should be done about it if anything?

    Soaring prices of staples, such as rice, triggored riots in the developing world last year. In fa ...[text shortened]... with me, I just read it on Yahoo news the other day. I'm sure you can find it if interested.
    Short run shortages are tragic and it takes both market solutions for the long-run and government action in the short run to prevent people starving to death. I am for improving access to food during price spike, catastrophes, and famines caused by dramatic forces of nature and agricultural diseases/blights on food supplies of local communities.

    In the long-run, even with a continually growing China and often-growing India, the inventory levels and price expectations that cause the spice trigger market solutions.

    As price goes up, more food is grown, more investment is done to improve crop yields, and more innovation time is spent on feeding the hungry. Further as nations of even a billion people grow economically, more of them can make enough to avoid starving.
    It has been happening throughout human history.


    The percentage of people starving this year is lower than 100 years ago, and the next hundred years it will be even lower. Furthermore, population growth rates have leveled off in most of the world, including China. There is increasing obesity in China and Mexico, and very low starvation rates. In many very poor countries with high starvation rates like in India and Africa, there is a need for growth and investment so their countries can grow to.
  5. 21 Jun '09 22:49
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    Short run shortages are tragic and it takes both market solutions for the long-run and government action in the short run to prevent people starving to death. I am for improving access to food during price spike, catastrophes, and famines caused by dramatic forces of nature and agricultural diseases/blights on food supplies of local communities.

    In t ...[text shortened]... e in India and Africa, there is a need for growth and investment so their countries can grow to.
    Here is a breakdown of the people going hungry.


    "The world's most populous region, Asia and the Pacific, has the largest number of hungry people -- 642 million, up 10.5% from last year. Sub-Saharan Africa registers 265 million, an 11.8% increase. Even the developed world, undernourished is a growing concern, with 15 million in all and a 15.4% increase, the sharpest rise around the world".
  6. Standard member yo its me
    watch the acid...
    21 Jun '09 23:02
    Some satistics;
    http://www.wfp.org/hunger/stats
    "25,000 people (adults and children) die every day from hunger and related causes. Lack of Vitamin A kills a million infants a year..."

    Taking food away from the obeese would not help. I wonder, if, to a certian degree eating all that's in the house is an illogical way to not waste food? There is a project and I hope it gets the backing it needs, to stop world poverty and hunger by 2015;

    http://www.endpoverty2015.org/about
    http://www.un.org/millennium/declaration/ares552e.htm
    Some very hopeful things have been agreed to-12. We resolve therefore to create an environment – at the national and global levels alike – which is conducive to development and to the elimination of poverty I'm not sure how doable they really are.
  7. 21 Jun '09 23:05 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    Here is a breakdown of the people going hungry.


    "The world's most populous region, Asia and the Pacific, has the largest number of hungry people -- 642 million, up 10.5% from last year. Sub-Saharan Africa registers 265 million, an 11.8% increase. Even the developed world, undernourished is a growing concern, with 15 million in all and a 15.4% increase, the sharpest rise around the world".
    Right. India and China (where there are a billion people each, but where percentage of starvation is dropping) and Africa (where there are even poorer people and without growth).

    Asia is the largest continent, so you would expect to find the most starving and the most non-starving numbers of people.

    There is no real news or surprise here, just "hey, let's take this group of billions of people and see if there's more starving people there than in the groupings of millions of people..." duh, of course there are more absolute numbers to be expected from a larger sample size. you also have in a larger sample size more well-fed people and more happy people, so what?

    Question, are the rates going down or up in the Asia/Pacific region?
    Answer: down.


    Africa needs to work on basic rule of law and market principles and institutions.
  8. 21 Jun '09 23:36 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    Right. India and China (where there are a billion people each, but where percentage of starvation is dropping) and Africa (where there are even poorer people and without growth).

    Asia is the largest continent, so you would expect to find the most starving and the most non-starving numbers of people.

    There is no real news or surprise here, just "hey down.


    Africa needs to work on basic rule of law and market principles and institutions.
    I wonder if President Obama's proposed sanctions on North Korea will add to the numbers and the desperation of the people at large? All I can say for the people of Hawaii and/or Alaska, duck and cover!!
  9. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    22 Jun '09 01:50
    Originally posted by whodey
    I just read that world hunger has hit the one billion mark. That's right that means 1 in 6 people in the world are now going hungry.

    Of course, I am sure every once cares to some degree, some more than others, but what should be done about it if anything?.
    The world needs enforced vegetarianism. Hey all that livestock not being raised will probably decrease greenhouse gas emissions by a third. It will also reduce the demand for potable water worldwide.

    Coming to a mall near you soon. The rise of the veggo fascist!
  10. 22 Jun '09 03:03
    Originally posted by kmax87
    The world needs enforced vegetarianism. Hey all that livestock not being raised will probably decrease greenhouse gas emissions by a third. It will also reduce the demand for potable water worldwide.

    Coming to a mall near you soon. The rise of the veggo fascist!
    Won't PEDA be pleased!!
  11. 22 Jun '09 07:04
    I am Zambian, and I would estimate that at least half the people I knew growing up were undernourished. Even now when I visit home, I immediately notice the number of people that look unusually skinny compared to those I see in South Africa.
    There are a number of reasons why Zambia is such a poor nation:
    1. Mismanagement.
    2. Being a landlocked country in the center of the continent means imports cost a lot more and exports pay less.
    3. Not many good money making opportunities. Our only real export is copper, and a little tourism.
    4. The culture is not particularly conducive to gaining wealth. This includes among other things the large family sizes. There has been some progress on family planning, but there is still a lot of social pressure to have lots of children as soon as possible.
  12. 22 Jun '09 08:24
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I am Zambian, and I would estimate that at least half the people I knew growing up were undernourished. Even now when I visit home, I immediately notice the number of people that look unusually skinny compared to those I see in South Africa.
    There are a number of reasons why Zambia is such a poor nation:
    1. Mismanagement.
    2. Being a landlocked country ...[text shortened]... nning, but there is still a lot of social pressure to have lots of children as soon as possible.
    It is a sad state of affairs, but a familiar one for many former Communist models, as Zambia used to follow Soviet examples in economic policies since independence. As a result, after decades of time to progress, average incomes and life expectancies are below those from independence times!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zambia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Zambia
    http://www.heritage.org/Index/Country/Zambia

    Besides the market reforms that have already been taken to change this long-term pattern of under-performance, governments have been tasked with pushing for more reforms than what their local politics have allowed due to protests from unions and government workers. As we see in many developing countries, the overspending of the government has obvious and immediate effects on the nation's economy, but a lot of people grow to depend on government jobs/funding:

    "Zambia's total foreign debt exceeded $6 billion when the country qualified for Highly Indebted Poor Country Initiative (HIPC) debt relief in 2000, contingent upon meeting certain performance criteria. Initially, Zambia hoped to reach the HIPC completion point, and benefit from substantial debt forgiveness, in late 2003. In January 2003, the Zambian government informed the IMF and World Bank that it wished to renegotiate some of the agreed performance criteria calling for privatisation of the Zambia National Commercial Bank and the national telephone and electricity utilities. Although agreements were reached on these issues, subsequent overspending on civil service wages delayed Zambia's final HIPC debt forgiveness from late 2003 to early 2005, at the earliest. In an effort to reach HIPC completion in 2004, the government drafted an austerity budget for 2004, freezing civil service salaries and increasing a number of taxes. The labour movement and other components of civil society have objected to the sacrifices called for in the budget, and, in some cases, the role of the international financial institutions in demanding austerity."


    Aside from market reforms, Zambia needs to save some of its benefits from those times like the previous 2 years when copper prices are high, like Chile does with Copper and Norway does with oil.
  13. 22 Jun '09 08:50 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I am Zambian, and I would estimate that at least half the people I knew growing up were undernourished. Even now when I visit home, I immediately notice the number of people that look unusually skinny compared to those I see in South Africa.
    There are a number of reasons why Zambia is such a poor nation:
    1. Mismanagement.
    2. Being a landlocked country ...[text shortened]... nning, but there is still a lot of social pressure to have lots of children as soon as possible.
    I'd like to suggest that if Zambia is to grow faster like some other more successful African countries, it will need to replace professionals being killed off by AIDS, and we do not know which children will be the talented ones that find new sources of wealth for the country, but people are an investment in the Nation's future. In the meantime while the new generation of leaders developes, Zambia may want to look at the more successful policies of neighboring countries in dealing with aids, such as Uganda's “abstinence, be faithful, and condoms” program.
  14. 22 Jun '09 10:10
    Originally posted by eljefejesus
    It is a sad state of affairs, but a familiar one for many former Communist models, as Zambia used to follow Soviet examples in economic policies since independence. As a result, after decades of time to progress, average incomes and life expectancies are below those from independence times!
    Zambia was not so much communist but more socialist. However, I doubt that that was the basic cause of our economic woes.

    Besides the market reforms that have already been taken to change this long-term pattern of under-performance, governments have been tasked with pushing for more reforms than what their local politics have allowed due to protests from unions and government workers.
    We keep getting told what to do by the IMF and other such organizations, but there is little evidence that following their programs actually helps.

    Aside from market reforms, Zambia needs to save some of its benefits from those times like the previous 2 years when copper prices are high, like Chile does with Copper and Norway does with oil.
    We did dramatically benefit from the higher copper prices, and we do mismanage that resource.

    Regarding foreign debt that you mentioned earlier, part of the problem is the international loan sharks who keep pushing money at us. (World bank, IMF etc.).
    A few years ago I discovered that Zambia was getting a massive loan to fund one of its national parks. Though I fully support the idea of funding national parks, at some point we have to admit that we simply cannot afford to do so. Borrowing money for such purposes is a bad bad idea as we should have learnt the first time - with that 6 billion debt you mentioned whose repayments was costing most of our GDP. But if the world bank offers money (whatever the terms) and a politician knows he is getting a cut, who is going to say no?
  15. 22 Jun '09 10:13
    Originally posted by kmax87
    The world needs enforced vegetarianism. Hey all that livestock not being raised will probably decrease greenhouse gas emissions by a third. It will also reduce the demand for potable water worldwide.

    Coming to a mall near you soon. The rise of the veggo fascist!
    …The world needs enforced vegetarianism.
    ..…


    Yes -that is what I have been saying some time ago.
    It would have to be enforced by international law to forcibly make almost everyone not eat meat and with the only exemptions being sustainable hunting of wild animals and also meat from farm animals that graze on land so arid or unproductive for food crops that it just wouldn’t be practical to grow food crops there.