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Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    16 Mar '10 06:23 / 1 edit
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ynews/ynews_ts1253

    The fundamentalist conservatives in Texas have gone off the deep end.
  2. 16 Mar '10 07:07 / 1 edit
    Why are politicians on these kind of advisory boards? And why are people who distrust science on these kind of advisory boards?

    I wonder what they mean by "Great Society programs such as Title IX—which provides for equal gender access to educational resources—and affirmative action, intended to remedy historic workplace discrimination against African-Americans, are said to have created adverse “unintended consequences” in the curriculum’s preferred language."
  3. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    16 Mar '10 07:21
    - A reduced scope for Latino history and culture. A proposal
    to expand such material in recognition of Texas’ rapidly growing
    Hispanic population was defeated in last week’s meetings—provoking
    one board member, Mary Helen Berlanga, to storm out in protest.
    "They can just pretend this is a white America and Hispanics don't
    exist," she said of her conservative colleagues on the board. "They
    are rewriting history, not only of Texas but of the United States
    and the world."


    Sweet, I've said it before: in the U.S. the Hispanic population is today
    for the establishment what the black people were in the 1960s and
    before. But it won't last. In no time the country will be brunette, dark
    skinned, and speak Spanish. And then heads will roll. Cabrones.
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    16 Mar '10 07:21 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Why are politicians on these kind of advisory boards? And why are people who distrust science on these kind of advisory boards?

    I wonder what they mean by "Great Society programs such as Title IX—which provides for equal gender access to educational resources—and affirmative action, intended to remedy historic workplace discrimination against African ...[text shortened]... aid to have created adverse “unintended consequences” in the curriculum’s preferred language."
    Why are politicians on these kind of advisory boards?

    The Party always has a representative present to discourage betrayal of the State...oh wait wrong country.
  5. Standard member spruce112358
    Democracy Advocate
    16 Mar '10 08:32
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ynews/ynews_ts1253

    The fundamentalist conservatives in Texas have gone off the deep end.
    Jefferson certainly was not 'Christian enough' to be in the fundamentalist camp. Unitarians like to claim him for their religion, although apparently on the basis of his beliefs and not because he attended a Unitarian congregation -- I think those were mostly in New England at the time.

    Like Tom Paine who Teddy Roosevelt called a 'filthy little atheist' -- the Founding Fathers were NOT religious conservatives but men of the Enlightenment.

    The main difference with Unitarians at the time was the belief that Jesus was a man -- a respected teacher -- but human and not at all 'God' -- whatever that means. Very rational free-thinkers, the Unitarians.

    'Unitarian' is in opposition to 'Trinitarian' or 'Trinity' which is the rather odd (from a rational viewpoint) of Catholicism (Father, Son, Holy Spirit -- three yet one; one yet three). I suspect that the Trinity is in the best spirit of politicial compromise!

    Unitarians were among the first Protestants -- a very minor sect; they knew better than to draw attention to themselves over the ages.
  6. 16 Mar '10 17:43
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ynews/ynews_ts1253

    The fundamentalist conservatives in Texas have gone off the deep end.
    the only thing i see in there that's objectionable is trying to reform Phyllis Schafly, and i kind of think that is something the author of the article threw in as an example of what could happen, not something the school board proposed.

    berlanga's probably just grandstanding. i grew up in the same general area as her. you learn quite a bit about Hispanics going through the S. Texas education system. i don't know about the rest of the state.
  7. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    16 Mar '10 18:12 / 1 edit
    Quite aside from the underlying issue, of course Jefferson was not Christian enough to be anything.

    If anything, he was anti-Christian.

    http://www.nobeliefs.com/jefferson.htm

    And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerve in the brain of Jupiter. But may we hope that the dawn of reason and freedom of thought in these United States will do away with this artificial scaffolding, and restore to us the primitive and genuine doctrines of this most venerated reformer of human errors.

    Whether he's right or wrong, I can hardly blame a Christian for not looking at Jefferson as a religious role model.
  8. 16 Mar '10 18:20
    I'm sure that day will come in the U.S. Eventually. I am an optimist.
  9. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    16 Mar '10 18:25
    Originally posted by sh76
    Quite aside from the underlying issue, of course Jefferson was not Christian enough to be anything.

    If anything, he was anti-Christian.

    http://www.nobeliefs.com/jefferson.htm

    [i]And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Min ...[text shortened]... r wrong, I can hardly blame a Christian for not looking at Jefferson as a religious role model.
    You CAN blame them for rewriting the nation's history books to make it seem like Christianity is central to this country and it's founding!
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    16 Mar '10 18:27
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    the only thing i see in there that's objectionable is trying to reform Phyllis Schafly, and i kind of think that is something the author of the article threw in as an example of what could happen, not something the school board proposed.

    berlanga's probably just grandstanding. i grew up in the same general area as her. you learn quite a bit about Hispanics going through the S. Texas education system. i don't know about the rest of the state.
    How about the fact that European religious figures (Catholic philosopher St. Thomas Aquinas, Puritan theologian John Calvin and conservative British law scholar William Blackstoneare) being used as examples of what it is to be American instead of the Founding Fathers?
  11. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    16 Mar '10 18:37
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    You CAN blame them for rewriting the nation's history books to make it seem like Christianity is central to this country and it's founding!
    Well, yeah, that's probably true.
  12. 16 Mar '10 18:41
    Originally posted by sh76
    Well, yeah, that's probably true.
    In what sense is it true?
  13. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    16 Mar '10 19:42
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    In what sense is it true?
    In the sense that Christianity was probably not as central to the founding of the United States as some would have us believe.
  14. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    16 Mar '10 19:44 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    In what sense is it true?
    European theologians and lawyers are not more significant to American history than Founding Fathers, and claiming that strict Christian principles guided the founding of this nation is deceptive.
  15. 16 Mar '10 20:53
    Originally posted by sh76
    In the sense that Christianity was probably not as central to the founding of the United States as some would have us believe.
    Oh I misunderstood, I thought by "that" you meant christianity being central.