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  1. Standard member NicolaiS
    Cannabist
    30 Oct '04 23:44
    Can anybody tell me?
  2. 31 Oct '04 00:43
    Completely unique in the sense that only one computer on the ENTIRE internet can have that specific i.p. address. And there currently are 255^4 total addresses. (I think that number is correct, it is close either way) IPV6 will offer even more though.

    Note: This doesnt include all the LAN-only ip addresses in use; computers using NAT, etc.
  3. Standard member NicolaiS
    Cannabist
    31 Oct '04 12:02
    Thanks
  4. 08 Nov '04 23:20
    Sorry, may be too late to be helpful...

    While it's true that only one computer can have a given IP address on the public internet, the same address may be handed out to different computers at different times. I think my internet service provider gives my router a fixed internet address, but if they didn't, that address could change each time I switched it on.

    Also, if you are on an IP-based local area network (any home or office network, for instance), your computer will have an address on that network which is only unique among computers on the same side of the same router. For instance, the computer I'm using now has been given the address 192.168.1.13 by my router. The router is at address 192.168.1.1 as far as my computers are concerned, but it has a different address on the public internet. Tomorrow, if I turn this computer on before my son turns on the laptop he uses, mine might be 192.168.1.10 and his might be 192.168.1.13. There are thousands of other small networks with computers at each of these addresses.
  5. 15 Sep '05 12:02
  6. 15 Sep '05 14:45
    Roland is right in that you can get x.x.x.x at one time, shut your machine off and someone else can get it.

    Something totally "unique" is your MAC address - a hardware address that your network card carries. It's a few layers "deeper" than the IP address, and really not _that_ unique; in that I can fake them easily.

    But, while you are online, you are the only person with that IP address; sans local networks. (192.168.. / 10.0./)
  7. 16 Nov '05 21:23
    Originally posted by Morren
    Something totally "unique" is your MAC address - a hardware address that your network card carries. It's a few layers "deeper" than the IP address, and really not _that_ unique; in that I can fake them easily.
    How do you fake a mac address... the reason i ask is because i limit the computers who can access my wireless router/modem by the mac addresses of the two computers in my house - i thought that was secure against someone jumping onto my network from outside.
    So how does one fake a mac address and could someone find out the mac addresses in use in my network without first getting access to the router?
    Thanks for any advice
    Mike
  8. 17 Nov '05 14:57
    Originally posted by geckos
    How do you fake a mac address... the reason i ask is because i limit the computers who can access my wireless router/modem by the mac addresses of the two computers in my house - i thought that was secure against someone jumping onto my network from outside.
    So how does one fake a mac address and could someone find out the mac addresses in use in my network without first getting access to the router?
    Thanks for any advice
    Mike
    You have to know which ones you want to "pretend" to be and some hardware drivers allow you to change it... either on a packet by packet basis, or in the hardware.

    (For instance, rabbit3200 microprocessors allow you to change them.)

    (Of course that means *nothing* in terms of your wifi network. )
  9. 06 Sep '06 14:47
    Originally posted by tmetzler
    Completely unique in the sense that only one computer on the ENTIRE internet can have that specific i.p. address. And there currently are 255^4 total addresses. (I think that number is correct, it is close either way) IPV6 will offer even more though.

    Note: This doesnt include all the LAN-only ip addresses in use; computers using NAT, etc.
    Yeh. Close. It's 250( 256^ 3 ) since there are five numbers that the first field cannot have (0,117,127,179,255).
  10. Standard member coentje
    Plop!
    07 Sep '06 04:56 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by evildictaitor
    Yeh. Close. It's 250( 256^ 3 ) since there are five numbers that the first field cannot have (0,117,127,179,255).
    you really should start checking the dates on the last post of a thread. If it is over a year ago there is no need to reply anymore because all questions have probably been answered but i am sure that no one is really interested anymore.


    edit: seem like you have been doing the same thing a year ago. Do you have some sort of dead thread fetish?
  11. 15 Sep '06 07:51
    2 ^ 32 ip address, about 4 billion,


    RFC 1918 reserved address for private use
    (this address are not routed on the internet)
    10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255
    172.16.0.0-172.31.0.0
    192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255.255

    each dot seperates 8 bits,

    your global IP address is unique, internal ip addresses may overlapped

    for someone to discover your mac address he needs physical access to your computer, go to cmd.exe and type "ipconfig /all" you will get your mac address, 16 hex numbers(0-F),
    another way is being connected to your local network, ping the computer, and type "arp -a" in a linux box, and it might give the appropiate ip address mapped to a MAC address.

    filtering with MAC address is super safe.