General Forum

General Forum

  1. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Apr '13 13:283 edits
    “Vortex

    Hey, I’ve got a strong hunch that most all of us began getting sucked into this delightful hole during the earliest waking months of childhood. Though all creatures (including jungle members of the pyramidal food chain) crave contact and affection, the dominant social need appears to be frequent trips to nowhere in the easy harness of playful and/or serious, competitive games. Meaningful Conversation (even jesting and banter) learns to find its rightful place way back in the Social Transaction Line. Even as infants, loving family members would teach their new offspring cutesy baby talk introduction to word games. As toddlers, these same affectionate people bounced us on their knees while singing us “Patty Cake, Patty Cake Man” or teasing us into submission with Gentle Versions of “Got you Last; No you Didn’t; Did, too”.

    Gradually, the addiction becomes self supporting. No idea of the exact number but would bet One California Navel Orange that the Ratio of Red Hot Pawn Chess Players Only and Player/Forum Posters far exceeds that of Forum Specialists, per se. Yesterday, tried the still green premise out on Nursing Supervisor Ratched when she stopped for a cup of her Favorite Bigelow Black Tea during Morning Rounds. Her reaction, “Look, 409-B, don’t try playing any of your internet games on me as long as you’re here. If you ever pull this prank again, I’ll give you a few unmentionable cyber slaps you’ll never forget.” Oh my goodness, she’s just clocked in. Gotta run. Enjoy your day. [Vortex Lad]
  2. SubscriberPonderable
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    11 Apr '13 13:47
    vortex flow is one of my specialites. But I failed to find the hydrodynamic aspect in your post 🙁
  3. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Apr '13 14:423 edits
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    vortex flow is one of my specialites. But I failed to find the hydrodynamic aspect in your post 🙁
    "From a hydrological point of view, active caves are a series of connected conduits which drain water through an aquifer. Water tends to choose the easiest way through the system but different geological and morphological barriers act as flow restrictions Speleology."[International Journal of Speleology] If true (and it probably is), Agreement Within the Documented Body of Archived Data would Support the Coming of Age Premise that RHP Member Intellectual Energies Tend to Flow Towards "Only Chess Forum"; "General Forum' Alphabetic Word Game; and "Spirituality Forum" [Debate Topic] Thread Daily Posts and Chess Moves. Activity in All Other RHP Forum Threads Devoted to Sustained On-Topic Conversation [including many Interesting Opinionfests in Sports and Science Forums] amount to little more than an Intermittent Binary Trickle in Comparison.
    .
  4. Standard memberHandyAndy
    Non sum qualis eram
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    11 Apr '13 14:53
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    vortex flow is one of my specialites. But I failed to find the hydrodynamic aspect in your post 🙁
    Didn't you notice? It sucks.
  5. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Apr '13 18:243 edits
    "Vortex" Footnote: Late afternoon, after Ratched went home, Charge Nurse Vivian made an unscheduled visit to #409-B (after she had answered a New Patient's Questions about CNA Meal Time In-Room Feeding of Mechanical Soft, Special Dietary Foods next door). Apparently there was quite a Buzz about Ratched's Stern Rebuke in the One Flew Over / Staff Break Room. Vivian took exception in an aside with two Senior Assitants. Rowena, younger of the two, suggested a Routine Debriefing Session with Vortex Lad. An hour later in her Pink SUV, we achieved a kind of synthesis of the opposing views. Creature Requirements Ladder: 1) Air; 2) Safety; 3) Fluid Intake; 4) Edible Food; 5) Compatible Climate; 6) Contact within Their Species; 7) Acceptance and Affection; 9) Romance and Marriage, Family and Friends; 10) Competitive Events and Games; 10) Conversation About People, Places and Things; 11) Discussion of Events and Issues; 12) Spiritual Concepts and Ideas. Conclusion: Energies Flow at Various Rung Levels, Depending on Historic Development of the Species and Relative Maturity of its Members. ~Vivian & Vortex Lad
    .
  6. In your face
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    11 Apr '13 22:42
    Sucky, sucky.
  7. Wat?
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    12 Apr '13 01:37
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]“Vortex

    Hey, I’ve got a strong hunch that [/b]
    there's no place like home.

    The institution.

    -m.
  8. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    12 Apr '13 03:17
    Originally posted by Sicilian Sausage

    Sucky, sucky.
    Sicilian Sausage, some Urban Slang Usage may well raise eyebrows within
    the circles of polite society (like "The House of Mystery" in Oregon, USA).
  9. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    12 Apr '13 10:291 edit
    Originally posted by mikelom
    there's no place like home.

    The institution.
    -m.
    "Creature Requirements Ladder: 1) Air; 2) Safety; 3) Fluid Intake; 4) Edible Food; 5) Compatible Climate; 6) Contact within Their Species; 7) Acceptance and Affection; 9) Romance and Marriage, Family and Friends; 10) Competitive Events and Games; 10) Conversation About People, Places and Things; 11) Discussion of Events and Issues; 12) Spiritual Concepts and Ideas. Conclusion: Energies Flow at Various Rung Levels, Depending on Historic Development of the Species and Relative Maturity of its Members." ~Vivian & Vortex Lad

    Thanks, Mike. I'd forgotten The Creature Requirement of Hearth and Home. 2) Safety [Protection and Privacy within a Defensible Home, not at all unlike a Castled Position in Chess (0-0 or 0-0-0)]; 4) Edible Food [Hearth and Home to Furnish a Means of Cooking and Light; and an 'Institutional' Place/Room for Villagers and Townspeople to Meet and Greet] -VL.
  10. SubscriberSuzianne
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    14 Apr '13 21:50
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "Creature Requirements Ladder: 1) Air; 2) Safety; 3) Fluid Intake; 4) Edible Food; 5) Compatible Climate; 6) Contact within Their Species; 7) Acceptance and Affection; 9) Romance and Marriage, Family and Friends; 10) Competitive Events and Games; 10) Conversation About People, Places and Things; 11) Discussion of Events and Issues; 12) Spiritual Concept ...[text shortened]... ht; and an 'Institutional' Place/Room for Villagers and Townspeople to Meet and Greet] -VL.
    You are just becoming more and more inscrutable.

    Most days I just pass over your posts rather than sit and deconstruct them, and I wager most others do the same.

    Please, please remember one word above all others. Clarity.
  11. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    14 Apr '13 22:09
    ^
    Thumbs Up
  12. SubscriberPonderable
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    07 May '13 05:13
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "Creature Requirements Ladder: 1) Air; 2) Safety; 3) Fluid Intake; 4) Edible Food; 5) Compatible Climate; 6) Contact within Their Species; 7) Acceptance and Affection; 9) Romance and Marriage, Family and Friends; 10) Competitive Events and Games; 10) Conversation About People, Places and Things; 11) Discussion of Events and Issues; 12) Spiritual Concept ...[text shortened]... ht; and an 'Institutional' Place/Room for Villagers and Townspeople to Meet and Greet] -VL.
    Looks like an offspring of Maslow...

    And safety is such a weak concept here...the maslow pyramide is somewhat more intuitive and simpler and meets coquette's demand on clarity.
  13. SubscriberKewpie
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    07 May '13 07:231 edit
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    Looks like an offspring of Maslow...

    And safety is such a weak concept here...the maslow pyramide is somewhat more intuitive and simpler and meets coquette's demand on clarity.
    I'd have to agree. The Maslow concepts are straightforward and easily understandable. Why would you want to mess them up?

    Ponderable, in the German written language, apart from sentence commencement, is it not true that only nouns/names are capitalised?
  14. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    07 May '13 07:31
    Originally posted by Ponderable

    Looks like an offspring of Maslow...

    And safety is such a weak concept here...the maslow pyramide is somewhat more intuitive and simpler and meets coquette's [?] demand on clarity.
    "Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation". Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans' innate curiosity. His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, some of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow used the terms Physiological, Safety, Belongingness and Love, Esteem, Self-Actualization and Self-Transcendence needs to describe the pattern that human motivations generally move through." (1 of 2)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs
  15. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    07 May '13 08:132 edits
    “Maslow's pyramid of needs was first developed in the 1940s; a revised version of the pyramid puts parenting at the top.” If you have ever felt that your children are your life’s work, then you may in fact be recognizing a high-level psychological need. Caring for your children, feeding them, nurturing them, educating them and making sure they get off on the right foot in life – all of the things that make parenting successful – may actually be deep-rooted psychological urges that we fulfill as part of being human. This is according to a team of psychologists who have updated a cornerstone of modern psychology – Abraham Maslow’s pyramid of needs. Maslow’s pyramid describes human motivations from the most basic to the most advanced. But Maslow’s time-tested pyramid, first proposed in the 1940s, had begun to look a bit weathered and outdated.

    So a team of psychologists, including two from Arizona State University, recast the pyramid. In doing so, they have taken on one of psychology’s iconic symbols and have generated some controversy along the way. The revamp of Maslow’s pyramid reflects new findings and theory from fields such as neuroscience, developmental psychology and evolutionary psychology, said Douglas Kenrick, an ASU professor of psychology and lead author of the paper, “Renovating the pyramid of needs: Contemporary extensions built upon ancient foundations.” The paper was published in the May issue of Perspectives on Psychological Sciences. Despite being one of psychology’s most memorable images, Maslow’s pyramid hasn’t always been supported by empirical research, said Steven Neuberg, an ASU Foundation professor and co-author of the paper. “Within the psychological sciences, the pyramid was increasingly viewed as quaint and old-fashioned, and badly in need of updating,” Neuberg added. “It was based on some great ideas, several of which are worth preserving,” Kenrick said. “But it missed out on some very basic facts about human nature, facts which weren’t well understood in Maslow’s time, but were established by later research and theory at the interface of psychology, biology and anthropology.”

    Maslow developed the pyramid of needs to represent a hierarchy of human motives, with those at the bottom taking precedence over those higher up. At the base of Maslow’s pyramid are physiological needs – hunger, thirst and sexual desire. According to Maslow, if you are starving and craving food that will trump all other goals. But if you are satisfied on one level, you move to the next. So, once you are well fed, you worry about safety. Once you are safe, you worry about affection and esteem and so forth. Perhaps most famously, at the top of Maslow’s pyramid sat the need for self-actualization – the desire to fulfill one’s own unique creative potential. The research team – which included Vladas Griskevicius of the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and Mark Schaller of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver – restructured the famous pyramid after observing how psychological processes radically change in response to evolutionarily fundamental motives, such as self-protection, mating or status concerns.

    The bottom four levels of the new pyramid are highly compatible with Maslow’s, but big changes are at the top. Perhaps the most controversial modification is that self-actualization no longer appears on the pyramid at all. At the top of the new pyramid are three evolutionarily critical motives that Maslow overlooked – mate acquisition, mate retention and parenting. The researchers state in the article that while self-actualization is interesting and important, it isn’t an evolutionarily fundamental need. Instead, many of the activities that Maslow labeled as self-actualizing (artistic creativity, for example) reflect more biologically basic drives to gain status, which in turn serves the goal of attracting mates. “Among human aspirations that are most biologically fundamental are those that ultimately facilitate reproduction of our genes in our children’s children,” Kenrick said. “For that reason, parenting is paramount.”

    The researchers are not saying that artists or poets are consciously thinking about increasing their reproductive success when they feel the inspiration to paint or write. “Reproductive goals are ultimate causes,” Kenrick added, “like the desire of birds to migrate because it helps them survive and reproduce. But at a proximate (or immediate psychological) level, the bird migrates because its brain registers that the length of day is changing. In our minds, we humans create simply because it feels good to us; we’re not aware of its ultimate function.” “You could argue that a peacock’s display is as beautiful as anything any human artist has ever produced,” Kenrick said. “Yet it has a clear biological function – to attract a mate. We suspect that self actualization is also simply an expression of the more evolutionarily fundamental need to reproduce.” But, Kenrick adds, for humans reproduction is not just about sex and producing children. It’s also about raising those children to the age at which they can reproduce as well. Consequently, parenting sits atop the revamped pyramid.

    There are other distinctions as well. For Maslow, once a need was met, it disappeared as the individual moved on to the next level. In the reworked pyramid, needs overlap one another and co-exist, instead of completely replacing each other. For example, certain environmental cues can make them come back. If you are walking down the street thinking about love, art or the meaning of life, you will revert quickly to the self-protection level if you see an ominous-looking gang of young men headed your way. The new pyramid already has generated some controversy within the field.

    The published article was accompanied by four commentaries. While the commentaries agreed with the basic evolutionary premise of the new pyramid, they take issue with some of the specific details, including the removal of self-actualization and the prominence of parenting in the new pyramid. “The pyramid of needs is a wonderful idea of Maslow’s,” Kenrick said. “He just got some of it wrong. Now people are talking about it again, which will help us get it right.” (2 of 2)

    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs)

    Note: Thank you, Ponderable, for once again breathing life into a sleeping topic for which there was (and continues to be) much more to discover and learn. How and When you seem to know Where to Probe Remains a Mystery.

    Opinion: Maslow's pyramid elevated our inner need for "self-actualization – the desire to fulfill one’s own unique creative potential". This early insight makes total sense: Fulfilling Our Emotional, Intellectual and Spiritual Potential. (gb)
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