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General Forum

  1. Joined
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    21 Dec '13 01:50
    I read a book written by a fellow who has the form of autism known as Asperger's, the title being 'Look Me in the Eye.' (Asperger's folks don't like to maintain eye contact for long.) That has got me looking at some websites on Asperger's. Here is a site with a long list of characteristics of Asperger's.

    http://www.autism-world.com/index.php/2007/09/13/list-of-aspergers-syndrome-characteristics/

    I would think this condition might be a plus for chess players. Specifically, the ability to seize on some particular topic (e.g. chess) and really focus on it could lead to good results.

    Getting personal, do you see many of your own traits in this list?
  2. Standard memberlemon lime
    ookookachu
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    21 Dec '13 03:13
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    I read a book written by a fellow who has the form of autism known as Asperger's, the title being 'Look Me in the Eye.' (Asperger's folks don't like to maintain eye contact for long.) That has got me looking at some websites on Asperger's. Here is a site with a long list of characteristics of Asperger's.

    http://www.autism-world.com/index.php/ ...[text shortened]... ould lead to good results.

    Getting personal, do you see many of your own traits in this list?
    I have a very mild case of aspergers. Not enough to stop me from getting anything done, but it's bad enough that I can become fixated on one and only one thing for waaay too long. So I would say yes, focus is a good thing, but being too focused is not so good. Imagine focusing on something happening in one corner of the chess board to the exclusion of everything else, and you'll have a pretty good idea of the problem people with aspergers have dealing with their own lives on a day to day basis.

    Playing chess has been good therapy for me, because it forces my mind to become more flexible. I'm able to shift focus from one thing to another pretty much at will now... in other words, I have more control over my own thoughts. I couldn't always do this, but I learned to do it after I got tired of losing one game after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after another after after ... I lost a lot of games.



    There's nothing wrong with me wrong with me wrong me with me with me with me with me with me me me me....
  3. Joined
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    21 Dec '13 13:35
    Originally posted by lemon lime
    I have a very mild case of aspergers. Not enough to stop me from getting anything done, but it's bad enough that I can become fixated on one and only one thing for waaay too long. So I would say yes, focus is a good thing, but being too focused is not so good. Imagine focusing on something happening in one corner of the chess board to the ex ...[text shortened]... othing wrong with me wrong with me wrong me with me with me with me with me with me me me me....
    Someone tap that phonograph please. I think the stylus is stuck.
  4. Standard memberlemon lime
    ookookachu
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    22 Dec '13 00:45
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    Someone tap that phonograph please. I think the stylus is stuck.
    It's not so bad. From my standpoint it seems like a very watered down and manageable version of autism. And there is no terrible stigma attached to it. As far as inherent mental conditions go, it's mostly talked about as though it's a somewhat interesting condition. The only downside is the name... it sounds like something you won't see on the menu at McDonalds or Booger King.

    I understand the bit about eye contact for people with severe autism. It's too intense for them. A lot of personal information is transmitted by the eyes, but for autistics it's just too much information to take in all at once. Sometimes it is for me too, but I'll either avoid looking at someones eyes or I might actually find my self staring at someones eyes for too long. When it comes to eye contact it can go either way... either I want to look or I want to avoid looking.
  5. Joined
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    22 Dec '13 03:191 edit
    Originally posted by lemon lime
    I understand the bit about eye contact for people with severe autism. It's too intense for them.
    That's one of the items I have to check 'Yes.'

    My sister says my handwriting looks like a fourth-grader's, and in fact the most negative report card comments from my elementary school teachers were for handwriting. That is another 'Yes.'

    The nonfiction on my home bookshelf outnumbers the fiction by 10:1, and there is a website that says Apergery people prefer to read nonfiction.

    I hate talking in front of a crowd, but I don't know if that is relevant.
  6. Standard memberlemon lime
    ookookachu
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    22 Dec '13 08:11
    Originally posted by Paul Dirac II
    That's one of the items I have to check 'Yes.'

    My sister says my handwriting looks like a fourth-grader's, and in fact the most negative report card comments from my elementary school teachers were for handwriting. That is another 'Yes.'

    The nonfiction on my home bookshelf outnumbers the fiction by 10:1, and there is a website that says Apergery ...[text shortened]... to read nonfiction.

    I hate talking in front of a crowd, but I don't know if that is relevant.
    I hate talking in front of a crowd, but I don't know if that is relevant.

    It can be relevant for the same reason. Any situation with too much information can be overwhelming, but what constitutes too much information (too much stimuli) depends on your level of sensitivity. Apprehension over talking in front of a crowd is a common phobia, almost everyone has to learn how to deal with that if it's something they need (or want) to do. For some reason it's easier for me to speak before a group of people than it is to simply be in a crowd, where people are talking to one another. It almost always seems to come across as unintelligible chaos, and it's affect on me can range from mild irritation to feeling very disturbed... Reveal Hidden Content
    yeah yeah, I know... there's a joke in there somewhere
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    22 Dec '13 12:01
    The worst are bloody average people (*with their "knowvledge" from popular magazines), people f ree of asparagus, autosomething and any other syndrome, but with the capability to exploit others' weaknesses.
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