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  1. 03 Aug '09 20:59 / 1 edit
    I bought this book some time ago, but just today i picked it up and to my horror, he starts with end game principles, immediately the book left my hand as if it were a leprous finger from a recently deceased person. why should i learn endgame principles i thought, is it really necessary, will it bring me any joy or is it just one of those areas of chess that we must learn if we are to improve. It will be painful i thought, so dry that the trees shall be bribing the dogs, a veritable desert region! a cactus shadow loomed across the room and a lone coyote howled in the distance! has greenpawn learned any endgame principles I thought, mmm, he never really talks about them if he has, hes more interested in the cut and thrust of the middle game. Perhaps i can ignore it, just the same, i don't really like pawns that much anyhow, they just seem to get in the way of my pieces, should be sacrificed or gambited away at the first opportunity, doubled or tripled just to watch them squirm, the idea of trading down my pieces to reach a favourable endgame fills me with horror, is that really chess? perhaps its chess on a different level, a more subtle and sophisticated level?

    i dunno, maybe i should lock myself in a room for several days, and try to assimilate end game principles, and awaken like the rising sun, dawning a new day of technical virtuosity. bah humbug, its just not me, i will always be a hacker, laying unsound traps, making unsound sacrifices, chasing kings during unsound attacks, encouraging my opponents counter play by one move plans!
  2. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    03 Aug '09 21:21
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I bought this book some time ago, but just today i picked it up and to my horror, he starts with end game principles, immediately the book left my hand as if it were a leprous finger from a recently deceased person. why should i learn endgame principles i thought, is it really necessary, will it bring me any joy or is it just one of those areas of c ...[text shortened]... chasing kings during unsound attacks, encouraging my opponents counter play by one move plans!
    Boris Spassky was once quoted as saying: "Studying endgames is like quitting smoking, it's a smart idea, but not enjoyable" Even GM's get bored with endgames, but they know it helps win games, so they do it.

    ...yes there are two paths you can go by, but in the long run, there's still time to change the road you're on.
    - Led Zepplin
  3. 03 Aug '09 22:04
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I bought this book some time ago, but just today i picked it up and to my horror, he starts with end game principles, immediately the book left my hand as if it were a leprous finger from a recently deceased person. why should i learn endgame principles i thought, is it really necessary, will it bring me any joy or is it just one of those areas of c ...[text shortened]... chasing kings during unsound attacks, encouraging my opponents counter play by one move plans!
    Just read the book backwards, everything will be fine.
  4. 03 Aug '09 22:49
    Lol, both are wonderful suggestions, yes it seems ol Capa has a section on the Ruy, the French, Queens Gambit declined right at the end of the book, what's it doing there, yep i gonna read it backwards and maybe even upside down!
  5. Standard member Eric LeFavour
    The guy
    03 Aug '09 23:04
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I bought this book some time ago, but just today i picked it up and to my horror, he starts with end game principles, immediately the book left my hand as if it were a leprous finger from a recently deceased person. why should i learn endgame principles i thought, is it really necessary, will it bring me any joy or is it just one of those areas of c ...[text shortened]... chasing kings during unsound attacks, encouraging my opponents counter play by one move plans!
    Capablanca, GMs, phooey, what do they know? Stick to what is working for you Robbie. Endgames are for sissys. Do not change anything and stay the course. It should not be long, and you will not have improved anything at all.
    Just hassling you my friend. You asked me to reflect on Simple Chess by Stean when I got a chance. I have to tell you Robbie, I stink so bad that unless my opponent is having a yard sale on chess pieces. I do not stand a chance of acquiring any. LOL The book is ok. I do not have a deep understanding of the game, but the book seems to be close to my level. I really have to study it sometimes. It is not a quick reader. I have been notating PGNs a lot to view the material. I do think that helps and it goes into detail on some GM games (mostlye Fischer so far). Using the game to demonstrate proper usage of the chapters topic. Weak pawns, open files, etc.... Puts good ideas in my head and helps to warn about potential dangers. I am a hands on guy. I have to botch it up a few times before I get it right. LOL
    On another note. What a brilliantly descriptive narrative! From our good friend..... Uncle Robbie. In my mind, I saw the whole thing.
  6. 03 Aug '09 23:14
    Originally posted by Eric LeFavour
    Capablanca, GMs, phooey, what do they know? Stick to what is working for you Robbie. Endgames are for sissys. Do not change anything and stay the course. It should not be long, and you will not have improved anything at all.
    Just hassling you my friend. You asked me to reflect on Simple Chess by Stean when I got a chance. I have to te ...[text shortened]... narrative! From our good friend..... Uncle Robbie. In my mind, I saw the whole thing.
    Lol, thank you for the encouragement my friend, it is a long and hard upward struggle, no question about it, one step forward and two backwards is the chess path, but with each and every step, a little more of the summit is envisioned and one day, we shall find ourselves enjoying a panoramic view of the immortal game!
  7. 03 Aug '09 23:23
    I really dont know what it is about chess that makes us players strive to be better. Almost a compulsion to put it mildly. I don't understand it. What is it about chess!

    Back to the topic. I have the ebook but as you probably know, its pretty hard to read from a computer screen. But I skimmed through it and it looked alright. I think I like the part where he annotates some games. Perhaps robbie, when you're done you can post a little review.

    But hey, you're already 1600+. What are you reading Chess FUNDAMENTALS for. That s for people like me. But I guess the annotated games would be good for you.
  8. 03 Aug '09 23:51 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Goshen
    I really dont know what it is about chess that makes us players strive to be better. Almost a compulsion to put it mildly. I don't understand it. What is it about chess!

    Back to the topic. I have the ebook but as you probably know, its pretty hard to read from a computer screen. But I skimmed through it and it looked alright. I think I like the part where ENTALS for. That s for people like me. But I guess the annotated games would be good for you.
    Lol, sure my friend if i can get past the last five chapters! every chess player must reassess their play, even Kasparov, who dominated chess for almost twenty years was his own most critical opponent, thus we reassess our play. As our understanding grows, we get a kind of vague outline as in a hazy mirror of what we like and feel comfortable with, and what we do not like. thus as Macpo correctly states, we try to develop a style of play. but until that point we must try to learn the basics and fundamentals, first tactically (this essentially means trying to create undefended pieces, squares etc and also positionally with outposts, files weak squares etc etc

    the best thing that has helped me improve is making a tactical inventory. this simply means getting a piece of paper and writing down my opponents undefended pieces and pawns and also those pieces and pawns which are attacked once and defended only once ans seeing if i can attack them both at once. if you do this with diligence you will easily reach 1600, no problem. also when looking at your own camp, notice your own pieces that are undefended or defended only once and it will save you from much grief at the hands of those tricky tacticians!
  9. 03 Aug '09 23:55
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I bought this book some time ago, but just today i picked it up and to my horror, he starts with end game principles, immediately the book left my hand as if it were a leprous finger from a recently deceased person. why should i learn endgame principles i thought, is it really necessary, will it bring me any joy or is it just one of those areas of c ...[text shortened]... chasing kings during unsound attacks, encouraging my opponents counter play by one move plans!
    Why are you reading chessbooks?Judging by your forum prose you should be writing one!
  10. 04 Aug '09 00:05
    Originally posted by Winston Smith
    Why are you reading chessbooks?Judging by your forum prose you should be writing one!
    Lol, awe shucks, (blushes) if i thought that it was possible i may give it a try, but i am a measly chess chess player and my grasp of English grammar is rather scant as well. If i can get better, perhaps i may try one day, who can tell. But once again i really thank you for the encouragement.
  11. 04 Aug '09 00:07
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    f at the hands of those tricky tacticians![/b]
    Yes, alas tactics is a big issue at this level. I will try to put your advice into practice. It sounds very methodical. Perhaps one can train the brain to do this automatically with time.
  12. 04 Aug '09 00:52
    OK, Robbie, skip the endgame section if you want, but you'll be missing out on the infamous "Capablanca made a boner" example. (Example 8)

    I think Example 8 is correct in the UK editions, but there is a minor mistake in some U.S. editions. If interested, you can read more in Edward Winter's article below. Scroll down to entry 4786 titled "A pawn ending mystery."

    http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/winter29.html
  13. 04 Aug '09 08:55
    Originally posted by Goshen
    Yes, alas tactics is a big issue at this level. I will try to put your advice into practice. It sounds very methodical. Perhaps one can train the brain to do this automatically with time.
    yes my friend it is methodical, but what will happen is exactly as you have described it, your eye will cast its gaze over the chess board and it will automatically notice these placement anomalies, and not only that, you will look for ways to create these type of situations, captures that leave a piece undefended etc etc etc.

    the important thing is that we do it. for in the age of computer chess, how many of us have skimmed through a game clicking away on the mouse, we are like water skiers only touching the surface when we really should be like divers exploring the depths.
  14. 04 Aug '09 08:58
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    OK, Robbie, skip the endgame section if you want, but you'll be missing out on the infamous "Capablanca made a boner" example. (Example 8)

    I think Example 8 is correct in the UK editions, but there is a minor mistake in some U.S. editions. If interested, you can read more in Edward Winter's article below. Scroll down to entry 4786 titled "A pawn ending mystery."

    http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/winter29.html
    Gulp!, i have McKay version, manufactured in he United States of America, game 8, mmmm, that would be J.Mieses v Capa, Berlin 1913, centre game. will check it out, but i need to prepare my mind before attempting the endgame stuff.
  15. 04 Aug '09 10:28 / 1 edit
    Hi Robbie.

    You can actually skip the endgane stuff if you have faith in your
    basic endgame knowledge.

    Capa starts with the endgame because he does not want to have to
    show the reader how to win each endgame situation that crops up
    in his notes to the main games.

    Just enjoy the games and the light notes. Don't think of it as a task
    that one must do.

    Look forward to playing over the games as you would look forward to
    hearing a nice piece of music. Only Chess is better.

    You are recreating in your bedroom games that were played nearly
    100 years ago by wonderful chess players.

    You have in front of you the exact position that they had. You can
    see what they were thinking, plotting and avoiding.

    Let the game suck you in. You are peeking at Chess history.

    Sometimes you can smell the cigar smoke and hear the click of the wooden
    pieces on the wooden board as Capa makes a move.

    Play over each game a few times. It's like looking at a work of art.
    Everytime you look you see something different.