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  1. 13 Nov '16 06:51 / 5 edits
    Have you noticed that Carlsen resembles JF Kennedy?

    Okay, here's the story of Game Two.

    First I took the place in the photo reporters pit, with my Serbian monthly bus ID and cheapest Nikon camera existed. The security gorillas looked at me awkwardly but they did not say anything and let me in.

    Pic No 1
    https://i.imgsafe.org/805f88bf35.jpg

    Then we were ordered to leave two idle quasiintelligent men pretending to do something smart, but I managed to disguise myself as a walking philodendron and take a position behind Carlsen's back.

    Karjakin sent me this look:::
    https://i.imgsafe.org/805fcdb638.jpg

    Anyways, it was another boring draw::



    Pic of the venue:::
    https://i.imgsafe.org/80cebcde6f.jpg
  2. 13 Nov '16 07:10
    Vandervelde has already started the link and added the game.

    Good. As you will see I am not too fond of this game either.

    Blog Post 333
  3. 13 Nov '16 07:19
    Hi Vandervelde

    I've just read your notes, you seem to have the players mixed up.
    Karjakin was White, Carlsen was Black.

    Never mind. The game is just awful but you always get someone
    coming along and saying they found it interesting. I bet Robbie liked it.
  4. 13 Nov '16 07:34
    Okay, the only part of comment I would like to change now is, that it was Karjakin then who wanted to avoid Marshall's attack, which Carlsen used this summer to test young Chinese wunderkind (*and make a safe draw). Inspired by Carlsen's play in that game, I even played Marshall's attack on RHP and Gameknot twice or trice, it is actually annoying (*annoying for White) and funny way to make a draw.
  5. 13 Nov '16 07:51
    Hi Vandervelde ,

    I'm not sure Karjakin avoided Carlsen's Marshall, I think he delayed it.

    He's just seeing if Carlsen is going to go that way and has a corker TN ready for him.
    We will know round about game 8 or 9 if Karjakin goes mainline will Carlsen play it?

    That's two games gone and Karjakin has played himself into the match.
    He won't mind the bad press the games are getting, he is the underdog it's
    up to the champ to make things happen and Carlsen won't take Karjakin on
    in a hand to brawl unless he is sure.

    There is no doubt Carlsen rates Karjakin highly. Remember he was only player
    who tipped Karjakin to win the 2016 candidates. Carlsen never mentioned anyone
    else, just Karjakin.
  6. 13 Nov '16 15:42 / 3 edits
    I dispute the assertion that these games were boring, they are strategically rich, not every game can have fireworks. It was pointed out that Calrsen played the Berlin numerous times in his last world championship match, you can bet that Karjakin was prepared for it, thus the deviation. Magnus got his own back when asked about these mysterious rook moves, ...Rc8 and Karjakins Rb1 stating that there is usually an idea behind the moves and we who were following the game were also a little bemused when they appeared on the board. Rd1 instead of Rb1 was the computers choice if my memory serves me correct but in retrospect they are simply anticipating what will happen in the future. Karjakins b4 was also not a computer move but from a human point makes absolute sense. There was some tension in the game, no Berlins and everything to play for. Judith Polgars commentary is excellent, chess24's sucked and don't even try to get a rational consensus on chessbomb, they are Trump trolls.

    Chess at that level is about applying just a little constant pressure until ones opponents position ruptures or they are able to stabilise.
  7. 13 Nov '16 17:29
    Hi Vandervelde,

    I told you Robbie would like it.

    Hi Robbie.

    Any game where the first check comes on move 32 is not RHP fodder.

    But to show I can slip into 'position mode' when I want to.

    On another site some lad suggested that here:


    the move 23.c3.

    He was met with:

    Analysis by Stockfish 160716 64:


    23...Bf8 24.Ng3 Nbd7 25.Ba3 Bxa3 26.Rxa3 Ra8 27.Rxa8 Rxa8 28.Nf5 Kf8 29.b4 Ra3
    30.Re3 c5 31.Nd6 cxb4 32.cxb4 Ra4 33.Nxb5 Rxb4 34.Nd6 g6 35.Kf1 Ke7 36.Nc8+ Ke8
    37.Nd6+ Kf8 38.Rd3 Rb1+ 39.Ke2 Rb2+ 40.Rd2 Rb4 41.Ke3 Ke7 42.Nc8+ Ke8 43.Nd6+
    Kf8 44.Rc2 Ke7 = (-0.17) Depth: 31/48 00:00:26 27723kN

    and nothing else. I replied.

    You cannot just plug in a computer and hope it's vomit
    makes it clear to the lad what maybe wrong with 23. c3 here.


    On the surface there is nothing wrong with 23.c3 but it is not a
    killer move. It gains a tempo which in this position means nothing.

    The good guys (and these two are not too bad) give double thought to every pawn move.

    The likes of me and you ruin our positions with thoughtless pawn moves
    and then wonder why we lose when we bump into one of the good guys.

    These positions are all about not accepting responsibility.

    Look at the position again.



    Black has the d-file. Big Deal, what is he going to with it. He cannot get into White's position.

    However, when the c2-pawn goes to c3 the square d3 needs
    looking after and suddenly so does the b3 pawn (responsibility).

    An annoying twat like Carlsen will lick his lips and be thinking of Nd7-c5
    eyeing d3 and if White plays b3-b4 to stop Nc5 then the b6 Knight hops
    onto c4. (not to mention with pawns on c3 and b4 the b2 Bishop is useless
    and needs go to c1 to get back into game which in turn interrupts the connection of the Rooks.)

    All these little things matter, especially if you face an annoying
    twat like Carlsen. He is a genius at exploiting these little things.

    Of course you cannot sit back in awe and watch him dance
    all over you, you have to do things yourself. But what?

    All you have done with 23.c3 is given yourself the responsibility of holding
    weakened squares and have forced yourself to go ultra active against a
    solid position from a position that is not quite geared up to create counter play.

    Carlsen played 22...Bf8-b4 tempting 23.c3 and then he goes back to f8 again.

    That's how annoying he is. Fortunately Karjakin is not easily annoyed and kept the c2 pawn on c2.

    Todays lesson is keep your hands off the middle game pawns unless you can find three
    good reasons for moving one. And when you do...move a piece instead. If you are
    wrong then you can move it back again. You cannot do that with a pawn.
  8. 13 Nov '16 18:57
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi Vandervelde,

    I told you Robbie would like it.

    Hi Robbie.

    Any game where the first check comes on move 32 is not RHP fodder.

    But to show I can slip into 'position mode' when I want to.

    On another site some lad suggested that here:

    [fen]3rr1k1/5pp1/1np2n1p/1p2p3/1b2P3/1P3N1P/1BP1NPP1/R3R1K1 w - - 2 23[/fen]
    the move 23.c3.
    ...[text shortened]... ad. If you are
    wrong then you can move it back again. You cannot do that with a pawn.
    c3 deadens the Queens bishop and should be rejected me thinks, it turns whites greatest asset into a giant doubled pawn.

    Yes I agree, its a different style of chess altogether, these guys like you say are playing for minute almost imperceptible margins, its all about the improvement of their position. Engine slaves need to free themselves, chessbomb is full of them all slavishly freaking out at .2 of a pawn difference, they are well annoying.
  9. Subscriber 64squaresofpain On Vacation
    The drunk knight
    13 Nov '16 19:00
    Originally posted by greenpawn34

    Todays lesson is keep your hands off the middle game pawns unless you can find three
    good reasons for moving one. And when you do...move a piece instead. If you are
    wrong then you can move it back again. You cannot do that with a pawn.[/center][/b]
    Exactly, thanks GP.

    Simple but highly instructive notes like this can improve anyone's game if taken on board.
    GM Van Kampen even admitted a recent loss was due to a careless pawn push,
    and he even used this position (or somewhere around there) as an example during the stream.

    Based on how the first 2 games have gone, I wouldn't be surprised if all 12 games are drawn heading into tiebreak.
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    13 Nov '16 23:55
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi Vandervelde

    I've just read your notes, you seem to have the players mixed up.
    Karjakin was White, Carlsen was Black.

    Never mind. The game is just awful but you always get someone
    coming along and saying they found it interesting. I bet Robbie liked it.
    I have to admit that I enjoyed the game. It was a fencing match, fighting for squares.

    I thought Karjakin's approach for the first game of the match made sense. It struck me as consistent with Dvoretsky's comments about Carlsen's strengths and weaknesses in his 3-part interview on the Chessbase website.
  11. 14 Nov '16 02:22
    I struggle to understand 8 a3. Why not 8 c3? It preserves the LSB, prepares d4 and doesn't waste time with the Q rook. Is a knight on c3 worth all the drawbacks of 8 a3?
  12. 14 Nov '16 10:33
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    I have to admit that I enjoyed the game. It was a fencing match, fighting for squares.

    I thought Karjakin's approach for the first game of the match made sense. It struck me as consistent with Dvoretsky's comments about Carlsen's strengths and weaknesses in his 3-part interview on the Chessbase website.
    Hi Paul, where can I find this article?
  13. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    14 Nov '16 11:13
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    Hi Paul, where can I find this article?
    Ah, so you can be better prepared the next time you play MC?
  14. 14 Nov '16 12:18
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Ah, so you can be better prepared the next time you play MC?
    Yes thats it! nah I want to hear what Dvortesky has to say because its difficult for a patzer like me to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses so that it resembles even in a small way reality.

    From what I can discern Magnus games follow a kind of formula, With white he hardly gets any opening advantage. He plays mainly to avoid his opponents preparation by employing sidelines that lead very often to equal but not necessarily drawish positions. He likes balanced positions with little or no danger to himself where he can play on endlessly and generally increase the pressure incrementally until his opponents position cracks. One measly inaccuracy is all that it takes.
  15. 14 Nov '16 17:31
    Hi Robbie,

    You have it about right - you do not need the Dvoretsky's article.
    Of course if his style does not gel or more likely not in the mood, it can go wrong.

    I think I'm correct in saying he lost more games in 2015 in that
    one year than any other previous reigning champion lost in a year.

    He can hit bad runs of form. Stavanger.2015 P.9 W2 D3. L4.