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  1. Joined
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    02 Jun '19 15:294 edits
    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-05-radio-wave-therapy-effective-liver-cancer.html

    At first, when I read this above article, I was very skeptical of their claim that radio waves alone could be effectively used to treat cancer as radio waves, unlike X-rays, have no significant ionizing effect so I found it difficult to believe this would work.
    But, I think this is very unlikely to be a hoax because, if you read it carefully, they say the have "shown" it to work and they describe a specific experiment for it that can be readily replicated in other labs to check the validly of the claimed results and therefore if it was a hoax then that hoax would soon be easily blown and then they would be done for scientific fraud and disgraced and punished accordingly and they would surely know it and thus I think they surely wouldn't be that STUPID as to try and pull off such a flimsy hoax!

    They also explained an apparently plausible biological mechanism of how this radio-wave therapy could actually work, which further increases my confidence that this is no hoax. It really surprises me that radio-waves alone could credibly ever be used to cure cancer.

    I hope this would lead to cures for many types of cancers but, given the appalling long history of many proposed cancer treatments seeming very hopeful at first only to be found to be mostly ineffective, what do you think are the chances that this one will?
  2. Subscribersonhouse
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    02 Jun '19 16:16
    @humy said
    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-05-radio-wave-therapy-effective-liver-cancer.html

    At first, when I read this above article, I was very skeptical of their claim that radio waves alone could be effectively used to treat cancer as radio waves, unlike X-rays, have no significant ionizing effect so I found it difficult to believe this would work.
    But, I think this is very unl ...[text shortened]... rst only to be found to be mostly ineffective, what do you think are the chances that this one will?
    Isn't it just the result of ohmic heating? An RF heat source applied to a specific area, namely the tumor? The only thing I see there is it would have to be done like the Cliniac, where xrays are moved around in such a way as to limit the affects on the surrounding tissue but the focus is always on the tumor. That said, it would be wavelength dependent. For instance, if the tumor was 1 cm across, then you would hope they would use 1 cm radiation to make the beam the minimum width to do the job and that requires significant engineering in terms of antenna science to make the beam as narrow as possible. So if the tumor was 2 cm wide then 2 cm wavelength should be used and so forth. It seems to me the only thing going for an RF beam is radiative heating and so you are basically boiling the tumor to death.
  3. SubscriberPonderable
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    02 Jun '19 16:271 edit
    If you read the link in the original post a few facts are mentioned:

    * The therapy is already approved in Europe, the approval with the FDA is in course.
    * There is a compnay (by chance in the vicinity of where I live) in Germany making and marketing the devices.
    * It is non-thermal intensity
    * The researchers mentioned in the article found a mechanism about how the mechanism of the therapy works (the waves are adapted to the Calciumchannels in the cell, which serve as antennae and are hindered to take in the Calcium, the tumor thus suffers from malnutrition.
    * You need a biopsy and a tuning of the wavelength to be successful. So MD's are still needed to administer the procedure.
  4. Subscribersonhouse
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    02 Jun '19 18:04
    @ponderable said
    If you read the link in the original post a few facts are mentioned:

    * The therapy is already approved in Europe, the approval with the FDA is in course.
    * There is a compnay (by chance in the vicinity of where I live) in Germany making and marketing the devices.
    * It is non-thermal intensity
    * The researchers mentioned in the article found a mechanism about how the ...[text shortened]... d a tuning of the wavelength to be successful. So MD's are still needed to administer the procedure.
    How accurate does the wavelength have to be? Is that wavelength the same in human A as in human B? And how much power are we talking about? Also, is the damage due to just heating one specific molecule, does that molecule break apart or some such?
  5. Joined
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    02 Jun '19 19:025 edits
    @sonhouse said
    How accurate does the wavelength have to be? Is that wavelength the same in human A as in human B? And how much power are we talking about? Also, is the damage due to just heating one specific molecule, does that molecule break apart or some such?
    If you read the link you will get the answers to some albeit not all those quations.
    The link said;

    "the radio frequency delivered was at low and safe levels, ... It was actually lower than those generated by holding a cell phone close to the ear."

    And, although I'm not sure about this, I don't think it is about the 'heating' of a molecule.
    The link said;

    "...a specific calcium channel, Cav3.2, was acting like an antenna for the radio signals we sent out, which allowed calcium to penetrate the HCC cell membrane and go into the cell, triggering HCC growth arrest," Pasche said.
    ...
    Our team found it was the influx of calcium that stopped the growth of HCC cells and shrunk, and in some cases eliminated, the tumors. This effect was the same even if the cancer had metastasized to other parts of the body."


    The wavelength doesn't depend on the human but the type of cancer.

    The link said;

    "The frequencies used are specific to the patient's type of cancer as identified through tumor biopsies or blood work,
    ...
    Pasche and Barbault have discovered radio frequencies for 15 different types of cancer, "

    It does sounds strange to me this talk about having a "frequency" for a cancer; like some typical bit of nonsense said in one of those silly third rate science fiction films that make no sense. But I think it does make sense.
  6. Subscribersonhouse
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    02 Jun '19 22:54
    @humy said
    If you read the link you will get the answers to some albeit not all those quations.
    The link said;

    "the radio frequency delivered was at low and safe levels, ... It was actually lower than those generated by holding a cell phone close to the ear."

    And, although I'm not sure about this, I don't think it is about the 'heating' of a molecule.
    The link said;

    "...a speci ...[text shortened]... of those silly third rate science fiction films that make no sense. But I think it does make sense.
    Well it must be like the spectroscopic analysis of stars showing lines equating to iron, calcium and such. So each isotope would have a wavelength associated with it that would cause specific kinds of behavior, maybe starting say, a calcium ion inside a molecule to vibrate, I guess that would be like heating an individual atom in a molecule, something like that. If it can't ionize an atom then it sounds like the only thing left is heating a specific atom, calcium in this case. It mentions 15 frequencies. I would love to see exactly what those frequencies are and what band, like 10-12 Ghz? 20-30 Ghz? or would it be more like 9.6432 Ghz is one frequency V 9.743 Ghz as the second frequency?
  7. SubscriberPonderable
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    03 Jun '19 08:23
    @sonhouse said
    Well it must be like the spectroscopic analysis of stars showing lines equating to iron, calcium and such. So each isotope would have a wavelength associated with it that would cause specific kinds of behavior, maybe starting say, a calcium ion inside a molecule to vibrate, I guess that would be like heating an individual atom in a molecule, something like that. If it can't ...[text shortened]... 20-30 Ghz? or would it be more like 9.6432 Ghz is one frequency V 9.743 Ghz as the second frequency?
    This is the Website of the Company:

    https://www.therabionic.com/therapy-with-the-therabionic-p1-medical-device/

    the Point (if I understood correctly) is the antenna effect. So the Calcium is forming Queues in the Clacium channel, those Queues acn act as antennae. And they are specific to Cancer cells. So that is where the frequency is aimed at.

    In fact in the link that I posted are some scientific papers quoted. I might read them if Need be.
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