1. Devonshire
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    15 Apr '18 21:51
    Let’s revist this topic for the sake of some of the newcomers in here... who seem to be keen to avoid it. SecondSon for example.

    Here’s the question guys:

    How do you personally decide what is, and what isn’t, literal in the bible?


    PS: An upvote for anyone finding my last thread on this topic and linking it for reference 🙂
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    15 Apr '18 21:55
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    Let’s revist this topic for the sake of some of the newcomers in here... who seem to be keen to avoid it. SecondSon for example.

    Here’s the question guys:

    [b]How do you personally decide what is, and what isn’t, literal in the bible?



    PS: An upvote for anyone finding my last thread on this topic and linking it for reference 🙂[/b]
    Yes, the “up votes” are so very important.
  3. Devonshire
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    15 Apr '18 21:59
    Originally posted by @romans1009
    Yes, the “up votes” are so very important.
    Romans1009, would you like to discuss how you decide what is literal in the Bible? 🙂
  4. Joined
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    15 Apr '18 22:39
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    Let’s revist this topic for the sake of some of the newcomers in here... who seem to be keen to avoid it. SecondSon for example.

    Here’s the question guys:

    [b]How do you personally decide what is, and what isn’t, literal in the bible?



    PS: An upvote for anyone finding my last thread on this topic and linking it for reference 🙂[/b]
    It seems to me that if one sees no justification or need to rephrase a Bible passage using an introductory phrase like “in other words...”, then it is to be taken literally, as is.
  5. Devonshire
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    15 Apr '18 22:42
    Originally posted by @js357
    It seems to me that if one sees no justification or need to rephrase a Bible passage using an introductory phrase like “in other words...”, then it is to be taken literally, as is.
    Do you include, for example, all the parables of Jesus? Are they literal?
  6. Standard memberRajk999
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    15 Apr '18 22:451 edit
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    Do you include, for example, all the parables of Jesus? Are they literal?
    I would say Yes. A parable is a story with both an earthly and a spiritual meaning. The earthly one is true and literal, as well as the spiritual one.
  7. Devonshire
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    15 Apr '18 22:501 edit
    Originally posted by @rajk999
    I would say Yes. A parable is a story with both an earthly and a spiritual meaning. The earthly one is true and literal, as well as the spiritual one.
    Do you believe there was a real, actual lost coin, a real lost sheep, an actual buried pearl, some actual wise and foolish builders? Etc...
  8. Standard memberRajk999
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    15 Apr '18 22:52
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    Do you believe there was a real, actual lost coin, a real lost sheep, an actual buried pearl, some actual wise and foolish builders? Etc...
    They are all real-life events to which people can relate.
    coins get lost, so do sheep, pearls and treasure gets buried.
    The point is the earthly meaning sets the stage for the spiritual one.
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    15 Apr '18 22:59
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    Do you include, for example, all the parables of Jesus? Are they literal?
    Do you see a justification or need to rephrase, say, the parable of the talents? If you do, then I suggest that there is no obligation for you to take it literally.

    It’s interesting that this parable, and possibly others, includes an “in other words” of its own. It is:

    “For to everyone who has will more be given, and he will have an abundance. But from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away.”

    The rephrasing may indicate that there is no obligation to take the story of the talents literally, although it doesn’t imply it shouldn’t be.
  10. Devonshire
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    15 Apr '18 23:01
    Originally posted by @rajk999
    They are all real-life events to which people can relate.
    coins get lost, so do sheep, pearls and treasure gets buried.
    The point is the earthly meaning sets the stage for the spiritual one.
    That’s not what I’m asking. I am asking if the parables are literal...or are they parabolic.

    Ok how about Daniel’s dreams, were the things he saw literal?
  11. Devonshire
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    15 Apr '18 23:031 edit
    Originally posted by @js357
    Do you see a justification or need to rephrase, say, the parable of the talents? If you do, then I suggest that there is no obligation for you to take it literally.

    It’s interesting that this parable, and possibly others, includes an “in other words” of its own. It is:

    “For to everyone who has will more be given, and he will have an abundance. But fro ...[text shortened]... bligation to take the story of the talents literally, although it doesn’t imply it shouldn’t be.
    I agree with your observation that there is textual and contextual evidence that while they may be considered parabolic examples of life relevant experiences, they are not accounts of real events.
  12. Devonshire
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    15 Apr '18 23:04
    Let’s not miss what I’m asking here which is how does one decide what is real or what isn’t.
  13. Standard memberSecondSon
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    15 Apr '18 23:34
    Originally posted by @divegeester
    Let’s not miss what I’m asking here which is how does one decide what is real or what isn’t.
    God decides, then one agrees with God.

    Or one doesn't, then that one fails to learn the truth.
  14. Standard memberRajk999
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    15 Apr '18 23:51
    Originally posted by @secondson
    God decides, then one agrees with God.

    Or one doesn't, then that one fails to learn the truth.
    Translated :
    The pastor decides. Then if one agrees with the pastor its like agreeing with God.
    Or one doesn't, then that one fails to learn the truth
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    16 Apr '18 00:06
    Originally posted by @rajk999
    Translated :
    The pastor decides. Then if one agrees with the pastor its like agreeing with God.
    Or one doesn't, then that one fails to learn the truth
    Wrong. God’s Holy Spirit Who indwells people who believe in Christ and His Resurrection and who have accepted Christ into their hearts leads people to the truth.

    You don’t believe in Christ’s deity or that God’s Holy Spirit indwells believers. You’ll never learn the truth or know the power of God until you do.
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