1. Standard memberavalanchethecat
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    11 May '10 18:01
    Given the dearth of evidence supporting any of the various flavours of religion available, what makes believers choose one sort over another?
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    11 May '10 18:20
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    Given the dearth of evidence supporting any of the various flavours of religion available, what makes believers choose one sort over another?
    I think it would have to be relavence to their lives.
  3. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
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    11 May '10 23:36
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    Given the dearth of evidence supporting any of the various flavours of religion available, what makes believers choose one sort over another?
    I reckon when people are at their lowest ,(and often dumbest), that whatever religon is proffered up to them they will accept.
    I've seen this with Christianity, Moslem, Hindu.
    Notably I haven't seen it with Bhuddists. The Bhuddists I know all made their choice when they were in a place of clarity, not out of fear that they would end up in Hell or whatever.
  4. Cape Town
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    12 May '10 06:111 edit
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    Given the dearth of evidence supporting any of the various flavours of religion available, what makes believers choose one sort over another?
    The number one reason for choosing a given belief, as I am sure we all know, is because our parents believed it.
    Number two is probably nearly identical in that someone we respect believes it.
  5. Cape Town
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    12 May '10 06:141 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    I think it would have to be relavence to their lives.
    I find that unlikely. I do not think anyone tries out religions to check for relevance. I think that people make whatever religion they have chosen, relevant or not by choice.
    Also relevance tends to be used as justification after the fact.
  6. Cape Town
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    12 May '10 06:16
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Notably I haven't seen it with Bhuddists. The Bhuddists I know all made their choice when they were in a place of clarity, not out of fear that they would end up in Hell or whatever.
    Have you met Buddhists from a predominantly Buddhist area?
  7. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
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    12 May '10 06:23
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Have you met Buddhists from a predominantly Buddhist area?
    I've met Bhuddists predominantly from my area,ie- south-east Queensland, Northern New South Wales and a couple from Melbourne (Australia). I have only met three ordained monks.I found their stories interesting and noteably different from the Christians I've met. (Of course not all Christians are the same)
  8. Cape Town
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    12 May '10 07:031 edit
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    I've met Bhuddists predominantly from my area,ie- south-east Queensland, Northern New South Wales and a couple from Melbourne (Australia). I have only met three ordained monks.I found their stories interesting and noteably different from the Christians I've met. (Of course not all Christians are the same)
    I come from a predominantly Christian country and the vast majority are Christian because their parents were Christian. A few generations back of course it was different - they were converted by European missionaries.
    I did meet one person who claimed to be Buddhist, but I suspect his version was rather different from what you are talking about. He claimed that if he chanted something all night it would bring him money, or solve some of his other problems.
    The few Hindus or Muslims I have met in Zambia also had parents who were members of the same religion. There is only one exception I can think of, a woman who married a Muslim and so converted to Islam (from Christianity).
    The same applies here in Cape Town. All Muslims, Hindus or Christians I know are the same religion as their parents.

    It is a slightly different story when it comes to the various Christian denominations. People do often maintain the denomination of their parents but there is some amount of movement, especially due to marriage. Also youth often change denomination - I think largely due to the influence of friends.
  9. Standard memberkaroly aczel
    the Devil himself
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    12 May '10 07:19
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    I come from a predominantly Christian country and the vast majority are Christian because their parents were Christian. A few generations back of course it was different - they were converted by European missionaries.
    I did meet one person who claimed to be Buddhist, but I suspect his version was rather different from what you are talking about. He claim ...[text shortened]... arriage. Also youth often change denomination - I think largely due to the influence of friends.
    Yes I agree with you. Most people vote the same as their parents and share the same faith as their parents.
    I find it interesting when people choose a religon based on what they think and not what their parents or peers think. Their journeys (emotional,spiritual) , are often revealing (about human nature in general) and highlight the fact that we do indeed have choices that are available to all people. Making choices for oneself is important-even if those choices are the same as your parents.

    I often wonder why religous differences have caused so much trouble in the past. I mean you can treat your wife like a thing and put your kids down and exploit workers and kill animals, develop nuclear weapons, join the army and a host of other harmful behaviours but if you think differently to the masses then you can be treated like you are the devil himself- even though your thoughts dont even affect anyone. You see why I say society in general is schizophrenic (divided against itself).
    Groups of people are often very stupid and the shortest distance between two points is a commitee😛
  10. Cape Town
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    12 May '10 15:14
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    I often wonder why religous differences have caused so much trouble in the past.
    It is hardly "in the past". It is a very present problem.
    In general humans (and most other species too) have evolved a tendency to "stick with the group". This manifests itself in numerous ways. It is hardly as simply as I put it though.
    Racism is a similar phenomena.
    Generally when people have a natural tendency to distrust or dislike outsiders or members not in their group. When a society or religions plays on this effect it can be enhanced to an large degree hence racism, tribalism, religious wars, the dislike or hatred of foreigners and many other similar problems.
    Religion is an especially bad perpetrator of this problem as religion itself evolved by taking advantage of this effect ie a religion which discourages its members from having other beliefs or even associating with those of other beliefs is more successful.
  11. Standard memberfinnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
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    14 May '10 01:12
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    I reckon when people are at their lowest ,(and often dumbest), that whatever religon is proffered up to them they will accept.
    I've seen this with Christianity, Moslem, Hindu.
    Notably I haven't seen it with Bhuddists. The Bhuddists I know all made their choice when they were in a place of clarity, not out of fear that they would end up in Hell or whatever.
    One story about the Buddha deals with this. A tribe North of his region was influenced by many different people advocating various religions. They thought he was wise and sent an emissary to ask for his advice. He said they should consider what they already believed - what is good, what is moral, what is desirable. He said that it was very likely their judgment was sound. If they found a religion that was consistent with their beliefs, then maybe that would be suitable for them.
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    14 May '10 03:00
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    Given the dearth of evidence supporting any of the various flavours of religion available, what makes believers choose one sort over another?
    The Truth. 😉
  13. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    14 May '10 10:02
    Originally posted by avalanchethecat
    Given the dearth of evidence supporting any of the various flavours of religion available, what makes believers choose one sort over another?
    Christianity is not a religion. It is a vertical relationship, in which God has done and continues to do the work. All man made religions are counterfeits... ritualistic/belief systems in which man by man's effort seeks to work for and gain the approval of God. Rejection of absolute truth creates a vacuum (mataiotes) in the soul, which eventually either sucks in some substitute or lurches into atheistic denial. A perceived problem with Christianity is the overarching genius simplicity of God's grace plan and the irrelevance of human IQ. Some reject Christ because their intellects are offended. Some because the gift seems too simple.
  14. Standard memberkaroly aczel
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    14 May '10 10:08
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    Christianity is not a religion. It is a vertical relationship, in which God has done and continues to do the work. All man made religions are counterfeits... ritualistic/belief systems in which man by man's effort seeks to work for and gain the approval of God. Rejection of absolute truth creates a vacuum (mataiotes) in the soul, which eventually either ...[text shortened]... e reject Christ because their intellects are offended. Some because the gift seems too simple.
    Some because they've found something more tangible.
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    14 May '10 11:20
    Originally posted by karoly aczel
    Some because they've found something more tangible.
    There's nothing more tangible than truth.

    Most of what people believe is just in their head.

    Do you think the resurrection is too intangible to be true? Think again.
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