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  1. 03 Mar '10 03:04
    Jason Whitlock, race-baiting the Super Bowl

    Peter Heck 3/1/2010 OneNewsNow.com

    The old adage says that religion and politics don't mix. Someone needs to tell FOX Sports writer Jason Whitlock that sports and politics don't either. In his February 17 column dedicated to ranking the top ten quarterbacks of all-time, Whitlock made one of the most ridiculous, outrageous, and boneheaded statements any sports reporter has made in a very long time.

    Whitlock was describing the game-clinching play of Super Bowl XLIV when Saints defensive back Tracy Porter jumped a route being run by Colts wide receiver Reggie Wayne, intercepted quarterback Peyton Manning's pass, and galloped down the field for a touchdown, securing the Saints win. For Indiana folks like me, it was heartbreaking. For the folks of New Orleans...ecstasy.

    But Whitlock managed to drive a political wedge into what should have otherwise been left as a thrilling moment of sports history by writing, "A black defensive back outsmarted a beloved white quarterback. I know. That's a truth many of you can't handle. It makes you uncomfortable."

    Yes, I'm serious...he really did write that. Whitlock didn't bother to enlighten anyone what it was about Porter's skin pigmentation that led to his decisive advantage over Manning. Perhaps that little nugget of wisdom will come in a future column.

    Now, for the purposes of full disclosure, I readily admit that I am a Peyton Manning sycophant. I would defend him and his body of work on the football field any day, against anybody. I would not be the source to come to for objective analysis of where he ranks on the list of all-time great quarterbacks. But this has nothing to do with defending Manning or his legacy. It doesn't even have anything to do with football. Rather, it has everything to do with our society having the courage to look race-baiters in the face, rebuke them, and then quit giving them a platform from which they can continue to fan the very flames of discord that they claim to abhor. They don't despise racism; they thrive on it. And in cases like Whitlock, they apparently make their living from it.

    Leading into his buffoonish remark, Whitlock wrote that he was making his column, "all about the elephant in the room" – that elephant being the fact that a black player outsmarted a white one. Apparently Whitlock saw himself as courageous for being willing to discuss what no one else would. Maybe it didn't dawn on him that the reason no one else was bringing it up was because it was such a stupid thing to say.

    How would Whitlock react if a white sports writer had written a column to address the "elephant in the room" regarding the Saints go-ahead touchdown that had occurred just moments before Porter's interception – a play that was just as pivotal in determining the game's outcome? If that writer correctly pointed out that the play was called by a white coach (Shawn Payton) against a black coach (Jim Caldwell), was executed by a white quarterback (Drew Brees) throwing to a white tight end (Jeremy Shockey) over a black defender (Jacob Lacey), and concluded that it was time we paid attention to those facts, would that be acceptable?

    You see, rational people just don't think this way anymore. Most of us aren't obsessed with race. Dare I say it – most of us don't really care about race. A lot of black Indianapolis Colts fans were devastated when the black Porter picked off the white Manning. Conversely, a lot of white New Orleans Saints fans were elated when it happened. That's as it should be, isn't it? Wouldn't that have been a better elephant to write about, if one was determined to bring race up at all? Isn't that living up to the words of Dr. King when he spoke of judging someone based on the content of their character (or in this case, their athletic play) rather than the color of their skin?

    Why does that elude people like Jason Whitlock? And how does he think that his racially driven remarks will help us reach that mountaintop of brotherhood? Perhaps it's because Whitlock isn't nearly as interested in standing atop that mountain as he is in drawing attention to himself and his work?

    It is a sad, sorry, and small man who looks at a great play like Tracy Porter made and who thinks the significant storyline is the color of his skin. So let's just address the real elephant in the room, shall we? As long as such men – men like Jason Whitlock – are setting the discussion agenda, we're never going to reach a colorblind society. They simply won't allow it.
  2. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    04 Mar '10 15:00 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Jason Whitlock, race-baiting the Super Bowl

    Peter Heck 3/1/2010 OneNewsNow.com

    The old adage says that religion and politics don't mix. Someone needs to tell FOX Sports writer Jason Whitlock that sports and politics don't either. In his February 17 column dedicated to ranking the top ten quarterbacks of all-time, Whitlock made one of the most going to reach a colorblind society. They simply won't allow it.
    This is not the first time Jason Whitless has done this sort of thing. He's a racist goon; simple as that. Why even pay attention to him?
  3. Subscriber shortcircuit
    The Energizer
    04 Mar '10 22:07 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    Jason Whitlock, race-baiting the Super Bowl

    Peter Heck 3/1/2010 OneNewsNow.com

    The old adage says that religion and politics don't mix. Someone needs to tell FOX Sports writer Jason Whitlock that sports and politics don't either. In his February 17 column dedicated to ranking the top ten quarterbacks of all-time, Whitlock made one of the most going to reach a colorblind society. They simply won't allow it.
    Jason didn't really understand the play. You see, the white QB threw a perfect pass to precisely where the play was designed. However, his black receiver ran a poor route, allowing the black defensive back to make a play.

    Now, my statement is made in jest, but is just as viable an argument as what the numbnuts Jason Whitlock wrote. The only thing worse than his writing techniques is the quality of the knowledge about the subject matter he writes about.

    When all else fails, pull the race card. What a crutch and a crock!!
  4. 04 Mar '10 23:34 / 2 edits
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jason_Whitlock


    On April 11, 2007, Jason wrote a column in the Kansas City Star, in which he weighed in on the Don Imus/Rutgers Women's Basketball controversy. He expressed his belief that while Imus's comments were deplorable, the real focus for the black community should be to minimize the negative impact of pop culture elements such as gangsta rap. Jason expressed a mainly negative opinion of the actions taken against Imus by the Rev. Jesse Jackson and the Rev. Al Sharpton, saying "It’s an opportunity for [Rutgers coach Vivian Stringer], Jackson and Sharpton to step on victim platforms and elevate themselves and their agenda."[3] His comments were also featured on several television networks, including CNN, where he was featured alongside Sharpton and accused Jackson and Sharpton of "exploiting these young people, making [...] the problems much bigger than what they should be."[4]

    I guess now it was time for Mr. Whitlock to elevate himself by stepping onto that same platform.
  5. 05 Mar '10 00:43
    Originally posted by sh76
    This is not the first time Jason Whitless has done this sort of thing. He's a racist goon; simple as that. Why even pay attention to him?
    If we simply passively stand by then the race mongers become emboldened. If we are to ever attain a post-racial society the race mongers should be called out and openly deplored.
  6. 05 Mar '10 00:53 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by scacchipazzo
    If we simply passively stand by then the race mongers become emboldened. If we are to ever attain a post-racial society the race mongers should be called out and openly deplored.
    well guys- untill the mid 80s the NFL had no black QB as owners and coaches throught they did not have the mental capabilities to be a QB.

    This issue has never gona away from US soicety and US sports. It took till the last 90s and early 2000 for the NFL to have its 1st black coach- so Jason Whitlock is just a throw-back to the old days
  7. 05 Mar '10 12:40
    Originally posted by spurs73
    well guys- untill the mid 80s the NFL had no black QB as owners and coaches throught they did not have the mental capabilities to be a QB.

    This issue has never gona away from US soicety and US sports. It took till the last 90s and early 2000 for the NFL to have its 1st black coach- so Jason Whitlock is just a throw-back to the old days
    because of past wrongs are we to castigate those of us who never felt the way the NFL owners did? Where does it all stop? Because of past racism reverse racism is somehow OK? The whole point of calling out the Whitlocks of the world is precisely attempting to single out those who would keep the flames of prejudice ardently burning. As you say "the issue" has never gone away from US society and/or sports. And it shall never go away as long as we allow idiots to call a brilliant play evidence of the superior IQ of one race over another. Throwback indeed! Reverse the picture and any publisher allowing such garbage onto their pages would have had his magazine shut down in a nanosecond.
  8. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    05 Mar '10 14:35
    Originally posted by spurs73
    well guys- untill the mid 80s the NFL had no black QB as owners and coaches throught they did not have the mental capabilities to be a QB.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_Williams_(American_football)
  9. 05 Mar '10 19:11 / 1 edit
    Indeed Doug Williams entered the NFL in 1978!
  10. 07 Mar '10 00:29
    Originally posted by spurs73
    well guys- untill the mid 80s the NFL had no black QB as owners and coaches throught they did not have the mental capabilities to be a QB.

    This issue has never gona away from US soicety and US sports. It took till the last 90s and early 2000 for the NFL to have its 1st black coach- so Jason Whitlock is just a throw-back to the old days
    There are plenty of racial issues that still need to be addressed before we ever reach a truly "post-racial society". But there's no way that Whitlock's approach is ever going to resolve any of these issues.

    A general rule of thumb for blacks speaking about race. Pretend a white person was making the comment. If it makes it look like you're wearing a sheet over your head, don't make the comment.
  11. 07 Mar '10 03:42
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    There are plenty of racial issues that still need to be addressed before we ever reach a truly "post-racial society". But there's no way that Whitlock's approach is ever going to resolve any of these issues.

    A general rule of thumb for blacks speaking about race. Pretend a white person was making the comment. If it makes it look like you're wearing a sheet over your head, don't make the comment.
    Couldn't have said it better myself! Good post, melanerpes.