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Debates Forum

  1. 13 Mar '10 02:57 / 2 edits
    http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/03/11/2010-03-11_assault_on_salt_an_insult_chefs.html

    If New York Assemblyman Felix Ortiz has his way, salt will be banned from use in New York restaurants or be faced with a $1,000 fine. According to Ortiz, the salt content in food today is causing health problems, primarily by promoting hypertension. Therefore, banning salt should help aleviate such health risks. As for New York restaurant owners, they are livid. After all, fine dining is part of what attracts tourists to the Big Apple and they argue would take a bite out of the old apple.

    So what do you New York boys have to say for yourselves? Well sh76 and No1? What exacly is in the water supply in New York that causes people to act this way?

    All I can say is, "No salt for you"!!
  2. 13 Mar '10 18:22
    Originally posted by whodey
    What exacly is in the water supply in New York that causes people to act this way?
    Maybe there's too much salt in the water!
  3. Standard member joneschr
    Some guy
    13 Mar '10 18:28
    Why don't we outlaw everything but nutri-paste. Everyone will be healthy, !yay!
  4. 13 Mar '10 19:43
    What tourist goes to New York for "fine dining"?!

    Anyway, it's a ridiculous idea that won't become law either way.
  5. 13 Mar '10 20:01 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    What tourist goes to New York for "fine dining"?!

    Anyway, it's a ridiculous idea that won't become law either way.
    Why not? If too much salt is "bad" for our health, then why not outlaw it especially in an era when we are all paying for each others health care costs?
  6. 13 Mar '10 20:20
    Originally posted by whodey
    Why not? If too much salt is "bad" for our health, then why not outlaw it especially in an era when we are all paying for each others health care costs?
    Do you think someone in favour of legalizing all drugs would be in favour of banning salt?

    Salt is not that bad, and as a last resort it can be taxed. However there are other things higher on the priority list. Let's start by introducing a 300% tax for alternative medicine.
  7. 14 Mar '10 00:01
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Do you think someone in favour of legalizing all drugs would be in favour of banning salt?

    Salt is not that bad, and as a last resort it can be taxed. However there are other things higher on the priority list. Let's start by introducing a 300% tax for alternative medicine.
    But if salt is "bad" for us, as well as drugs, shouldn't Big Brother protect us from them? Isn't it the duty of Big Brother to provide us with health insurance and see to it that we are protected from things that may cause ill health? After all, they provide speeding limits to lower deaths on the road, so why not lower salt limits?
  8. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    14 Mar '10 00:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    Isn't it the duty of Big Brother to provide us with health insurance and see to it that we are protected from things that may cause ill health?
    Perhaps "Big Brother" has a duty, if democratically mandated to do so, to make access to some kind of decent health care available to all. Maybe the speed limits are to stop irresponsible Driver A killing responsible Driver B. Maybe drug addiction causes violent crime and "Big Brother" is mandated to protect law abiding citizens from violent crime.

    But no. In whodey's world view, access to health care for the poor is forcing people to be healthy; in whodey's world view, speed limits place restrictions on the rights of drivers to kill themselves; and whodey's world view, "drugs" are illegal to protect the people who are addicted to them.
  9. 14 Mar '10 00:30
    Originally posted by FMF
    Perhaps "Big Brother" has a duty, if democratically mandated to do so, to make access to some kind of decent health care available to all. Maybe the speed limits are to stop irresponsible Driver A killing responsible Driver B. Maybe drug addiction causes violent crime and "Big Brother" is mandated to protect law abiding citizens from violent crime.

    But no. I ...[text shortened]... hodey's world view, "drugs" are illegal to protect the people who are addicted to them.
    My, my are we feeling a bit testy today? I am only exploring the limits of what people desire the Nanny state to control us. As for drugs, you could argue that legalizing it might help reduce violent crime. However, what if this increased usage? Clearly more people would then become negatively effected as well as drive up health care costs.

    How would you feel about a ban on smoking? I mean, second hand smoke clearly harms people and those who do it in private are driving up health care costs just like those who are taking in too much salt.
  10. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    14 Mar '10 00:34
    Originally posted by whodey
    My, my are we feeling a bit testy today?
    What are you going on about? I simply reponded to your post.
  11. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    14 Mar '10 01:21
    Originally posted by whodey
    Well sh76 and No1? What exacly is in the water supply in New York that causes people to act this way?
    Maybe there's too much salt in the water.
  12. 14 Mar '10 10:19
    Originally posted by sh76
    Maybe there's too much salt in the water.
    Hey! I made that joke myself about nine posts higher up the thread.
  13. 14 Mar '10 10:22
    Originally posted by whodey
    But if salt is "bad" for us, as well as drugs, shouldn't Big Brother protect us from them? Isn't it the duty of Big Brother to provide us with health insurance and see to it that we are protected from things that may cause ill health? After all, they provide speeding limits to lower deaths on the road, so why not lower salt limits?
    If salt is indeed bad, then it should be taxed to discourage people from consuming too much, and to help cover the cost of salt overconsumption. But as I said, there are other things which are more important and more hazardous for human health than salt.
  14. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    14 Mar '10 10:41
    Perhaps there's an excess of salt in the drinking water.
  15. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    14 Mar '10 12:22
    Originally posted by FMF
    Perhaps there's an excess of salt in the drinking water.
    sounds like some are getting high on their own supply......