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  1. 06 Mar '04 19:49
    Hi - here's an idea. I've regretted so many times clicking on the dreaded MOVE button only to see the instant I click on it to see I've made a blunder. What do you think if you had a second warning saying ARE YOU REALLY SURE ? which you had to click on before the move was accepted ? You might think this goes against the Chess rules of once you release a piece on a real board set up then it's final. But it woud give you a moment to review the move from a different angle and maybe you would see something staringly obvious you hadn't seen before.
  2. Standard member Phlabibit
    Mystic Meg
    06 Mar '04 20:19

    In OTB chess you shouldn't even touch a piece. If you touch it you must move it if at all legal.

    In correspondence chess you send a letter. If you put it in a mail box chances are the letter is good as sent. If you seal the envelope you can always open it. Don't drop that letter in the box unless you are sure about your move.

    So here at RHP if you hit that move button, the move is made. Think a little more before you hit that button, not after you hit it! This extra screen would slow down MAP players, and even players like me who don't hit the move button until they are ready.

    I'll admit I have made a move and wished I didn't, but that is my problem, not the sites.

    P-
  3. Standard member eyeqpc
    Robbo
    06 Mar '04 20:27
    Originally posted by Phlabibit

    In OTB chess you shouldn't even touch a piece. If you touch it you must move it if at all legal.

    In correspondence chess you send a letter. If you put it in a mail box chances are the letter is good as sent. If you seal the envelope you can always open it. Don't drop that letter in the box unless you are sure about your move.

    So here at RHP i ...[text shortened]... 'll admit I have made a move and wished I didn't, but that is my problem, not the sites.

    P-
    I whole heartedly agree.

    I play a lot of OTB games in tournament and league situations and there is definitely no 2nd chance there.
    I have been the victim of clicking on the move button then realising at the last minute that I made a mistake, especially when I have had a drink. But hey chess wouldn't be chess without that little bit of mistake making.

    -Robbo
  4. Standard member Otis
    Lucky Patzer
    06 Mar '04 20:30
    Pretty soon you'll find your self noticing your blunders once you've already clicked the yes your sure button.
  5. 06 Mar '04 22:27
    Thanks for that. I'll have to ask my mate kyngi, my neuroscientist friend, what it is in the brain that causes this to happen. It's the cannot see the wood for the trees scenario.
  6. 07 Mar '04 19:31
    Originally posted by pinehilluk
    Thanks for that. I'll have to ask my mate kyngi, my neuroscientist friend, what it is in the brain that causes this to happen. It's the cannot see the wood for the trees scenario.
    Brain processes that occur when you hit move: (This is totally conjectural btw!)

    Just before you hit move, you've made a decision to stick with one particular move, which means that all of the possibilities have been inhibited (a task performed by the frontal lobes, specifically dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Since this is the case, the only thing in your mind is the actual move you're going to make. As soon as you press the move button, the need to inhibit competing information goes away, and other possibilities instantly flood back into your mind. In some cases you made the right move, (and there were few competing possibilities in the first place) and so then you would not experience the'oh sh*&!' phenomenon. If you had a lot of competing possibilities (and you were thinking about other stuff as well - which interferes with frontal lobe inhibition processes) you might not be so lucky, and realise that you've just made a screw up... Hope this helps!
  7. 07 Mar '04 20:47
    Thanks for the input Joe - brill - I just need to work out what my brain diversion tactic is now. If only there was something else to click on before the MOVE button !
  8. 07 Mar '04 21:12
    Originally posted by pinehilluk
    Thanks for the input Joe - brill - I just need to work out what my brain diversion tactic is now. If only there was something else to click on before the MOVE button !
    Click on the 'analyze board' button and make the move there - no harm done if its wrong and your brain becomes uninhibited!

  9. 07 Mar '04 21:50
    Originally posted by colleman
    Click on the 'analyze board' button and make the move there - no harm done if its wrong and your brain becomes uninhibited!

    Of course you could also just move at random, removing any vested interest in what happens after you press move, problem solved!

  10. 09 Mar '04 22:46
    Well said, kyngi. I hadn't the expertise to put it in such specific anatomical terms, but I have always seen that phenomenon as "zooming in" and "zooming out" -- as I get closer to choosing a move, I select decision-tree branches at finer and finer levels, until I am "zoomed in" all the way to a few twigs and leaves. As soon as I click "move", I immediately zoom out, and there it is again -- the whole tree -- and I suddenly get another chance to look at its coarsest features. Most of the time I haven't missed anything here, but if I have, it has been completely ignored while I progressively "zoomed in", and now it's too late.

    I find that this effect is noticeable in almost any process that involves careful decision-making followed by an irrevocable (or inconveniently revocable) choice...

    Malcolm
  11. 12 Mar '04 01:39
    haven't read thru the entire thread here, so don't know if this was mentioned. if you notice it in time, you can click on the stop button on your browser and the move will not be sent thru. i've done this once before.
  12. Standard member Phlabibit
    Mystic Meg
    12 Mar '04 03:17
    Originally posted by astronomr5
    haven't read thru the entire thread here, so don't know if this was mentioned. if you notice it in time, you can click on the stop button on your browser and the move will not be sent thru. i've done this once before.
    Give it a try again.... it will not work. One of the updates at RHP saved the move, so if the connection quits the server still knows you moved.

    I had done that before, but it works no more.

    P-
  13. 12 Mar '04 03:28
    what about an undo request of an opponent like at yahoo live chess?
  14. 12 Mar '04 06:13
    Considering how cranky people get over getting timed out, I think it's just as well that you can't request a do-over from your opponent-- it would probably lead to a lot of griping and hard feelings.

    Also, in Yahoo chess it's a lot easier to make a fingerslip move than in RHP.
  15. 12 Mar '04 17:28
    I do agree however, that since you can take "as much time as needed" to make your move, if you use the analyse board, you should be able to see all angles and options....thing is to take the time to try all the options you want to look at and as such, the second chance button istn' needed. and true, you will eventually be clicking it by habit without thinking too.