1. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    28 Aug '20 14:16

    A wee bit long (had logging on issues with B.T. so kept adding bits on)
    Also semi-serious, not your usual fare for the less experienced players
    because I had to use a few OTB games. The reason for this is I have
    discovered an opening trap that (too date!) no one on RHP has fallen into.

    It all revolves White here playing 8.d4 to avoid the Marshall Gambit.


    ..and can Black play 8...Nxd4.

    It’s a trap first mentioned in the books around about the early 60’s.
    as time passed it was discovered it was not a trap! but playable.

    Of course this sets up the Noah’s Trap of which there are 100’s of RHP examples
    but the line we are interested in is the variation. 8....Nxd4 9.Bxf7+ and 10.Nxe5.

    It is also a minor tribute to Leonard Barden and although he seems to
    be the first to wrongly identify this as a trap, giving 8...Nxd4 a ‘?’ I
    for one am not throwing stones.(I’ve lived all my life in a glass house.)

    8...Nxd4 is on the path of the blunder which comes on move 10.


    Does Black move the d4 Knight to c6 or e6 or does Black play 10....Rf8.

    Another sub-variation in the same line was at one time thought to be good
    for Black (again the books said so) but this too was later found to be wanting.

    The game A Holmsten - J. Kiltti, Turku, Finland 1996 is worth a browse.

    Blog Post 463
  2. Joined
    01 Nov '01
    Moves
    133131
    29 Aug '20 21:03
    Hmmmm, so after 19 years on the site I've been found and in a Greenpawn blog.
  3. Joined
    27 Apr '20
    Moves
    357
    30 Aug '20 07:111 edit
    LoL hopefully you made good moves and not blunders.

    Edit: I just looked. You blundered. 😞
  4. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    30 Aug '20 12:091 edit
    Hi dcpk,

    I'll scan your games for something I may use (one you won). You never know
    it may kick off a whole blog like flicking through Leonard Barden's book did.

    There is another minor error in Leonard's book (page 72) This is a genuine nit-pick.

    Here White to play, Leonard says 18.Re1 wins the Queen.


    18...Qf5/Qg4/Qc6 all fail to a Knight Fork on either f6 or e7. However....

  5. Standard memberDeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    Quarantined World
    Joined
    27 Oct '04
    Moves
    87048
    31 Aug '20 17:37
    @greenpawn34 said
    Hi dcpk,

    I'll scan your games for something I may use (one you won). You never know
    it may kick off a whole blog like flicking through Leonard Barden's book did.

    There is another minor error in Leonard's book (page 72) This is a genuine nit-pick.

    Here White to play, Leonard says 18.Re1 wins the Queen.

    [fen]1rb2rk1/2pp1p1p/p3qp2/3N4/p1N5/8/P1PQ1PPP/R5 ...[text shortened]... 9.Nxf6+ as taking the Queen gets mated.} 19. Rxe6 Rb1+ 20. Re1 Rexe1+ 21. Qxe1 Rxe1 [/pgn]
    Hi greenpawn34,

    I'm trying to connect the above position with the lines given in your excellent blog and can't, white has somehow managed to lose his b-pawn and black's captured on the a-file with his b-pawn, creating the saving trap. I'm curious as to what the preceding game moves are?

    The last few blogs have been useful to me, my long term habit has been to play the Spanish at every opportunity, but recently I've been playing the Scotch Gambit. I want to investigate the mainline Scotch as well as the Italian, I seem to have to defend it a lot in 10 minute games on LiChess. In any case, Anti-Marshalls are of interest as I only knew about allowing it, h3 and a4. I'll try that out.

    There's a move in reply to 12. Qe4 to avoid Noah's ark, 12. ... Nc7 that seems to do well for black. It should be mentioned that that's based on what's in my database and 13. c3 and not 13. c4 seems to be the way to go for white. Here's a white win from a game played in Cuba in 1992:

  6. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
    Moves
    35797
    01 Sep '20 10:111 edit
    Hi DeepThought

    This is the game Leonard uses.

    Karoly Honfi vs Gyula Kluger, Hungary 1959

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