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  1. 21 Jan '08 06:04
    My God, I don't think I realized how intense game one of 2006's World Championship match between Kramnik and Topalov was. It was played in the Open Catalan in a pretty uncommon variation (7...Bxd2+). Here's the game with comments for anyone who didn't realize how fantastic it was the first time around (like me) and is interested in checking it out:

    [Event "WCh Elista"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2006.09.23"]
    [Round "1"]
    [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"]
    [Black "Topalov, Veselin"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "E04"]
    [WhiteElo "2743"]
    [BlackElo "2813"]
    [Annotator "Valeri Lilov"]
    [PlyCount "149"]
    [EventDate "2006.09.23"]

    {Hello dear chess friends! Today begins the first game of the world
    championship match between the two world champions till this moment, Vladimir
    Kramnik and Veselin Topalov. The game starts in 15:00 (GMT+03:00 Russian Time).
    For you directly live will annotate the chess master Valeri Lilov.} 1. d4 {
    Logically. Kramnik tries to receive a technical maneveuring positions of his
    type.} Nf6 {Interesting. What opening will choose Veselin ? Benoni or ?} 2. c4
    e6 {The Nimzo-Indian Defence. I suppose that Veselin will choose some more
    aggressive opening like Benoni or King's Indian} 3. Nf3 d5 4. g3 {Catalan} dxc4
    5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 a5 {It's one of the main lines of the Catalan. Now white's
    main continuations are 7.Qc2 and 7.0-0} 7. Qc2 Bxd2+ {A rarely move.} ({
    Most commonly played is} 7... Nc6) 8. Qxd2 {
    A modern continuation in the last years} ({It's possible and} 8. Nbxd2 b5 9. a4
    c6 10. b3 cxb3 11. Nxb3 {with a mutual chances for the both sides.}) 8... c6 9.
    a4 b5 ({In the game Grischuk - Moiseenko, Russia 2006 was} 9... b5 10. axb5
    cxb5 11. Qg5 O-O 12. Qxb5 Na6 13. Qxc4 Nb4 {
    and black gets some compensation for the pawn.}) 10. axb5 cxb5 11. Qg5 O-O {
    Kramnik follows the game of Grischuk} (11... O-O 12. Qxb5 Na6 13. Qxc4 Nb4 14.
    Qb3 Bb7 (14... e5 $6 {It was the move played by Moiseenko}) 15. O-O Rb8 $44)
    12. Qxb5 Ba6 $146 {It is a novelty of Topalov. Interesting probably it's
    Topalov's preparation. Let's try to look further.} (12... Ba6 13. Qxa5 Bb7 14.
    Qxd8 Rxa1 15. Qxf8+ Kxf8 16. O-O Ra2 17. Ne5 Ba6 (17... Bxg2 18. Kxg2 Rxb2 19.
    e3 (19. Nxc4 Rxe2) 19... Rb4 20. Rc1) 18. Rc1 Rxb2 19. Nc3 Nbd7 20. Nxd7+ Nxd7
    21. e3 Nb6 {
    It's a verry passive position for white so I don't like it. Let's back}) 13.
    Qa4 {Kramnik declines the pawn's sacrifice and chooses the positional move. He
    feels that inside the variation there's a preparation trap.} (13. Qa4 Qb6 14.
    O-O (14. Nbd2 Bb5 15. Qc2 Nc6 $15)) 13... Qb6 (13... Qb6 14. O-O Nc6 (14...
    Qxb2 $2 15. Nbd2 Qb4 16. Ne5 Nd5 17. Qxa5 $16) 15. Nc3 Qxb2 16. Rfc1 Qb6 17. e3
    Nd5 18. Nd2 Ncb4 (18... Ndb4 19. Na2 $1) 19. Qxa5 Qxa5 20. Rxa5 Rfc8 $11) 14.
    O-O (14. O-O Bb5 15. Qa3 Nc6 16. Nc3 Nd5 17. Rfc1 Rfb8 18. e3) 14... Qxb2 $6 {
    I don't agree with the Kramnik's decision to take on b2. Because after that
    the pawn on c4 will be lost and the pawn on a5 will become a strong weakness.}
    15. Nbd2 (15. Nbd2 Qb4 (15... Rc8 16. Rfb1 Qc3 17. Ra3 $18) 16. Ne5 Ra7 17.
    Nexc4 Nd5 $5 {/\ ?xa4 & Nc3}) 15... Bb5 {also I don't agree with this one move
    of Veselin I think more interesting was 15...Qb4} (15... Bb5 16. Nxc4 Bxa4 17.
    Nxb2 Bb5 18. Ne5 Nd5 19. Nec4 Nc6 20. e3 Rfb8 21. Rfc1 a4 (21... Ndb4 22. Nd6)
    22. Na3 Na5 23. Nxb5 Nb3 24. Nc7 a3 {
    This one variation is really verry interesting} 25. Nc4 Nxc1 26. Nxa8 a2 27.
    Be4 Rxa8 $17) 16. Nxc4 Bxa4 17. Nxb2 Bb5 18. Ne5 (18. Ne5 Nd5 19. Nbd3 (19. Na4
    $5 f6 20. Nc5 $5 fxe5 21. Nxe6 Bc6 22. Nxf8 Kxf8 23. dxe5 Nb4 24. Rfc1 $16 {
    and in this position I think the rooks are better than the knights.}) 19... a4
    20. Rfc1 Na6 21. e4 Ne7 (21... Ndb4 22. Bf1 $1) 22. Nf4 Rfd8 23. d5 $5 {
    a verry powerful idea.} exd5 24. Nxd5 Nxd5 25. exd5 Kf8 26. f4 $14 Rac8 27. Nc6
    Rd6 28. Kf2 Nb8 29. Nd4 Rxc1 30. Rxc1 Bd7 31. Nc6 $14) 18... Ra7 (18... Ra7 19.
    Nbc4 Nd5 (19... Rc7 20. Nd6 $1 Bxe2 21. Rfe1 Rc2 22. Rxa5 $16) (19... a4 20.
    Rfb1 Bxc4 21. Nxc4 Nd5 22. Kf1 $14 {
    In this endagme white have a small but verry estabilish edvantage.}) 20. Rfc1
    f6 $140 (20... a4 21. e4 $16 {/\ 22.Nd6}) 21. Bh3 $1 fxe5 (21... Re7 22. Nd3
    Nc6 23. e3 Rd8 24. Nc5) 22. Bxe6+ Kh8 23. Bxd5 exd4 24. Rcb1 Ba6 25. Kf1 Re8
    26. Nd6) 19. Bf3 {Again Kramnik chooses the positional continuation instead of
    19.Nbc4. Probably he plans to double the rooks on a-file. I think that the
    black's position is very heavy here.} (19. Bf3 Nbd7 20. Nxd7 Nxd7 (20... Bxd7
    21. Ra3) 21. Rfb1 {/\ 22.Nd1}) 19... Nbd7 (19... Nbd7 20. Nxd7 Nxd7 (20... Bxd7
    21. Ra3 {
    I simply cannot see a way how black will protect their's a-pawn for the future.
    } g5 22. e3 Rb8 23. Nd3 g4 24. Be2 a4 25. Nc5 Bc6 26. Rfa1) (20... Rxd7 21.
    Rxa5 Rb8 22. Rb1 Rxd4 23. Nd3 $18) 21. Rfc1 $1 {
    So after Rc1 I think white gets a clear advantage.} (21. Ra3 Rc8) 21... Rb8 (
    21... e5 22. Nc4 exd4 (22... Bxc4 23. Rxc4 $16) 23. Nd6 Rb8 24. Rd1 $16) 22.
    Nc4 Bxc4 (22... a4 $2 23. Nd6) 23. Rxc4 Nb6 (23... e5 24. Bc6 Nb6 25. Rb1 exd4
    26. Rxd4 Kf8 27. Rd3 $14 {Clear but estabilish advantage for white.}) 24. Rc3 {
    I think here white have a clear advantage. So maybe it's the best variation
    for white}) 20. Nec4 (20. Nec4 Rb8 21. Rfc1 a4 22. e3) 20... Rb8 21. Rfb1 (21.
    Rfb1 Nd5 22. e3 a4 23. Rc1 (23. Na3 Nc3 24. Nxb5 Rxb5 25. Rc1 a3 26. Nc4 a2 $17
    ) 23... Kf8 24. Bd1 Ke7 25. Ra3 $140 Rc7) 21... g5 $5 {
    Now Topalov fights for the initiative} (21... g5 22. e3 (22. h3 Nd5 23. e4 Nc3
    24. Rc1 Bxc4 25. Rxc3) 22... g4 23. Bd1 a4 24. Rc1 h5) 22. e3 (22. e3 g4 23.
    Bd1 a4 24. Rc1 Kf8 (24... h5 $6 25. Na3 Be2 26. Bxe2 Rxb2 27. Nc4 Rb4 (27...
    Rxe2 28. Kf1 $18) 28. f3 Kf8 29. Kf2 Ke7 30. e4) 25. f3 (25. Na3 Be2 26. Bxe2
    Rxb2 27. Nc4 Rb4 28. f3 gxf3 29. Bxf3 Rc7 30. Be2 Nd5 $15) (25. Ra3 Rc7 $1)
    25... gxf3 26. Bxf3 Rc7 27. Na3 Rxc1+ 28. Rxc1 Be2 29. Bxe2 Rxb2 30. Rc2 Rb3
    31. Nc4 Nd5 {it's not good for white. Black gets very active here.}) 22... g4 (
    22... g4 23. Bd1 a4 24. Rc1 Kf8 25. Nd6 a3 26. Nxb5 Rxb5 27. Na4 e5 $1 28. Rxa3
    Rb4 29. dxe5 Nxe5 30. Rca1 Ne4 31. Bc2 f5 {
    and black has more than enough compensation for the pawn.}) 23. Bd1 (23. Bd1
    Bc6 24. Rc1 Bd5 25. Nd3 Kf8 26. Kf1 $14) 23... Bc6 (23... Bc6 24. Rc1 Bd5 25.
    Nd3 h5 26. Kf1 Ne4 27. Ke1 Ndf6 {
    The black's knights cannot help anything of the queen's side a5 pawn.} 28. Nce5
    Kf8 29. Ra4 $14) 24. Rc1 (24. Rc1 Be4 25. Na4 Bd5 (25... Kf8 26. Nc3) 26. Nc5
    Nxc5 27. dxc5 Kf8 28. Nb6 Bc6 29. Ba4 {
    and I think Kramnik have a better endgame here}) 24... Be4 25. Na4 (25. Na4 {
    /\ Nc3 xa5} Rb4 26. Nd6 Bf3 27. Bxf3 gxf3 28. h3 h5 29. Nc8 Ra6 30. Ne7+ Kf8
    31. Nc6 Rb3 32. Rc5 $13) 25... Rb4 {Topalov never gets back!} (25... Rb4 26.
    Nd6 (26. Nd2 Bd5 27. f3 e5 $1) (26. Nc3 Rxc4 27. Nxe4 Rxc1 28. Nxf6+ Nxf6 29.
    Rxc1 a4 30. Ra1 a3 31. Kf1 h5 32. Bb3 Ne4 33. Ke2 Kg7 34. Bc2 {...}) 26... Bf3
    27. Bxf3 gxf3 28. Nc5 (28. Ra3 Ra6 29. Nc4 Rc6) 28... a4 29. Nd3 (29. Ra3 Nxc5
    30. dxc5 Rc7 31. h3 Nd7 $15) 29... Rb3 30. Ne1 a3 31. Nxf3 a2 $1 {
    and for the pawn black gets a very strong passed a-pawn.}) 26. Nd6 (26. Nc3 $5
    Rxc4 27. Nxe4 Rxc1 28. Nxf6+ Nxf6 29. Rxc1 a4 30. Ra1 a3 31. Kf1 h5 32. Ke2 Ne4
    33. Bc2 Ng5 $1 34. Ra2 Kf8 (34... Nf3 35. h4) 35. Kd3 Nh3 36. Bb3 Ke7 $11)
    26... Bf3 27. Bxf3 gxf3 28. Nc8 (28. Nc8 Ra6 (28... Ra8 29. Ne7+ Kf8 30. Nc6
    Rb3 31. Nc5 $1 {If now black's rook was on a6 there will be no such a move.}
    Nxc5 32. dxc5 $14 {white have a strong passed c-pawn}) 29. Ne7+ Kf8 30. Nc6 Rb3
    31. h3 (31. Nc5 $2 Nxc5 32. Rxc5 Ne4 33. Rc2 f6 $17) 31... Ne4) 28... Ra8 29.
    Ne7+ (29. Ne7+ Kf8 30. Nc6 Rb3 31. Nc5 Nxc5 32. dxc5 Rb2 33. Ne5 (33. Rxa5 Rxa5
    34. Nxa5 Ne4 35. c6 Nxf2 36. c7 Nh3+ 37. Kh1 Rg2 $4 (37... Nf2+ 38. Kg1 Nh3+
    $11) 38. Rf1 $4 (38. c8=Q+ Kg7 39. Qc2 Nf2+ 40. Qxf2 Rxf2 41. e4 $18) 38...
    Rg1+ 39. Rxg1 Nf2 33... Ne4 34. Nxf3 Nxf2 35. Ne5 Nh3+ $11) 29... Kg7 30. Nc6
    Rb3 31. Nc5 Rb5 32. h3 Nxc5 33. Rxc5 Rb2 34. Rg5+ Kh6 35. Rgxa5 Rxa5 36. Nxa5
    Ne4 37. Rf1 (37. Rf1 Ng5 38. Kh2 Ne4 39. Kg1 Ng5 40. Kh2 Ne4 41. Kg1 $11 Nd2
    42. Re1 Ne4 43. Rf1 $11) 37... Nd2 38. Rc1 Ne4 39. Rf1 f6 40. Nc6 Nd2 41. Rd1 (
    41. Rd1 Ne4 42. Nd8 $4 Rxf2 43. Rd3 Rg2+ 44. Kf1 Re2 45. Kg1 Nxg3 46. Nf7+ Kh5
    $19) 41... Ne4 42. Rf1 (42. Rf1 Kg6 43. Nd8 e5 44. Nc6 Kf5 45. Na5 h5 46. Nc4
    Ra2 47. h4 exd4 48. exd4 Ke6 49. Ne3 f5 {Still there are some chances for Topi
    to fight for win, but soon or late maybe3 it will happen draw.}) 42... Kg6 $17
    {Topalov says: No Draw! Play On! :-) Now as I see it's obvious that black has
    an advantage. There are many aspects: The passive rook on f1, who probably
    will never go up. The knight only gives to black the possibility to be
    captured. So that's why Veselin will play for a win.} (42... Kg6 43. Nd8 (43.
    Ne7+ Kg5 44. Nc6 h5 $1 45. Nd8 e5 (45... Kf5 {Probably this position is
    drawish, but white should be very accurately here. There are some chances, a
    little chanes but it's a something.}) 46. Nc6 (46. dxe5 fxe5 47. Nc6 Kf6 48.
    Na5 Ng5 49. Kh2 Rc2 50. Nb3 Ne4 51. Kg1 Ke6 52. Na5 (52. Nc1 $4 Nxf2 53. Rxf2
    Rxc1+ 54. Rf1 Rxf1+ 55. Kxf1 e4) 52... Kd6 53. Nb3 Kd5 54. Na5 Kc5 55. Nb7+ Kb6
    56. Nd8 Ng5 57. Kh2 Rd2 58. h4 Ne4 59. Nf7 Nxf2 60. Kg1 Nh3+ 61. Kh1 e4 62. Ng5
    Nxg5 63. hxg5 Rd5 64. Kg1 Rxg5 65. Kf2 Kc6 66. Rd1 Rd5 67. Rh1 Rd2+ 68. Ke1
    Re2+ 69. Kf1 Rxe3 70. Rxh5 Kd6 71. Ra5 Re2 $19) 46... Kf5 47. dxe5 fxe5 48.
    Ne7+ Ke6 49. Nc6 Kd6 50. Na5 Rc2 $17) 43... e5 (43... Ng5 44. Kh2 h5 45. h4 Ne4
    46. Nxe6 Nxf2 47. Nf4+ Kf5 48. Kg1 Ne4 49. Rxf3 Kg4 50. Nd3 $8 $11 {Shipov})
    44. Nc6 Kf5) 43. Nd8 Rb6 (43... e5) 44. Rc1 h5 (44... h5 45. Nc6 Rb2 46. Rf1
    Kf7 47. Na5 Rc2 48. Nb3 e5 49. dxe5 (49. Nc1 Ke6 50. dxe5 fxe5 51. Nd3 Rd2 52.
    Ne1 Ng5 53. Kh2 e4 $19) 49... fxe5 50. Na5 Ke6 51. Nb3 Kd5 52. Na5 Kc5 53. Nb7+
    Kb6 54. Nd8 Ng5) 45. Ra1 {-/+/-+} (45. Ra1 e5 $17) 45... h4 $6 {
    Veselin plays in a Kasparov's Style!} (45... e5) (45... h4 $6 46. g4 ({If now}
    46. gxh4 Kh5 ...
  2. 21 Jan '08 06:06
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    My God, I don't think I realized how intense game one of 2006's World Championship match between Kramnik and Topalov was. It was played in the Open Catalan in a pretty uncommon variation (7...Bxd2+). Here's the game with comments for anyone who didn't realize how fantastic it was the first time around (like me) and is interested in checking it out:

    [E ...[text shortened]... 46. g4 ({If now}
    46. gxh4 Kh5 ...
    Ha...part two....

    $19) 46... e5 47. dxe5 fxe5 {/\ 48...Rb2}) 46. gxh4 (46. gxh4 Kh5
    47. Ra2 e5 (47... Kxh4 48. Kh2 Ng5 49. Ra4 Rb2 50. d5+ Kh5 51. Nxe6 Rxf2+ 52.
    Kh1 Rf1+ 53. Kh2 Rf2+ $11) 48. dxe5 fxe5 (48... Rb8 49. Nc6 Rg8+ 50. Kh1 Rg2
    51. exf6 Kg6 52. Ne5+ $18) 49. Nf7 Rg6+ 50. Kh1 Rg2 51. Nxe5 Nxf2+ 52. Rxf2
    Rxf2 53. Kg1 Rg2+ 54. Kf1 $11 {and black cannot protect their f-pawn.}) 46...
    Kh5 47. Ra2 $1 (47. Ra2 Kxh4 48. Kh2 Ng5 49. Ra4 $1 {
    A very powerful and only move for saving.} Ne4 50. Ra7 $1 Rb2 (50... Nxf2 51.
    Rh7+ Kg5 52. Kg3) 51. Rh7+ Kg5 52. Nxe6+ Kf5 53. Nf4 Nxf2 (53... Rxf2+ 54. Kg1
    Ra2 55. Rh5+ Ng5 56. h4 Kg4 57. hxg5 Ra1+ 58. Kf2 Ra2+ 59. Kg1 (59. Ke1 $2 fxg5
    $17) 59... Ra1+ $11) 54. Kg1 (54. Kg3 Nh1+) 54... Nh1 $5 55. Kxh1 Rb1+ 56. Kh2
    f2 57. Ne2 Kg6 58. Ng3 Kxh7 59. Kg2 Rb2 60. Ne4 Kg6 61. Nxf2 f5 62. Kf3 $11 Rd2
    ) 47... Kxh4 48. Kh2 (48. Kh2 Ng5 49. Ra4 Rb2 50. d5+ Kh5 51. Nxe6 Rxf2+ 52.
    Kh1 Rd2 (52... Nxh3 53. Nf4+) 53. Nxg5 Rd1+ 54. Kh2 f2 55. Rf4 f1=Q 56. Rxf1
    Rxf1 57. Ne6 Rd1 58. Kg3 {and black must to look for draw.}) 48... Kh5 (48...
    Kh5 49. Rc2 {
    I think the game coming to draw. Veselin should not to give up the h-pawn.})
    49. Rc2 {I think the end of the game is too close. Let's back and find what
    must play black instead of h4.} Kh6 50. Ra2 Kg6 {
    It's a tricky manoeuvre or what ?} 51. Rc2 {White make a fortress.} Kf5 (51...
    Kf5 52. Nc6 (52. d5 e5 53. Nc6 Rb7 54. h4 Rg7 55. Kh3 {
    and now there is no Rg2 because of the mate threat Ne7!} Rh7 56. Rb2 Nc3 57.
    Rd2 Ne2 (57... Rg7 58. d6 Ke6 59. Nb8 Rg8 60. d7 Rd8 61. Kg4) 58. d6 Ng1+ 59.
    Kh2 Ne2 60. Ne7+ Kg4 61. Ng6 Rd7 62. Nf8 Rg7 63. d7 Kxh4 64. d8=Q Rg2+ 65. Kh1
    Rg1+ 66. Kh2 Rg2+ $11) 52... Rb7 53. d5 $1 e5 54. h4 Kg6 (54... Kg4 55. Rc4) (
    54... Rg7 55. Kh3 Rg2 56. Ne7 (54... Rd7 55. Kh3 Kg6 56. Kg4) 55. Kh3 Kh5 56.
    Rc4 $1 Nxf2+ 57. Kg3 Nd1 58. Kxf3 Rb3 59. Re4 Rd3 60. Nb4 Rd2 61. Rc4 $11) 52.
    Ra2 Rb5 53. Nc6 (53. Nc6 Rb7 54. d5 (54. Ra5+ Kg6 55. Ra2 Kh5 56. Ra5+ Kh4 57.
    Ra2 Rg7 $19) 54... e5 55. h4 Rg7 56. Kh3 $11 {and again the mate threat of e7!}
    ) 53... Rb7 54. Ra5+ $2 {It was a time for Kramnik to mistake. It's very
    difficult to stay aalive and to defend without to do any mistakes at the whole
    game.} (54. d5 $142) 54... Kg6 55. Ra2 Kh5 (55... Kh5 56. d5 e5 (56... Rg7 $2
    57. dxe6 Rg2+ 58. Kh1 Kg6 59. Nd8 $3 {and now wins white!!}) 57. Ra4 $1 Nxf2
    58. Kg3 e4 59. Kxf2 Rb2+ 60. Ke1 (60. Kg3 Rg2+ 61. Kf4 f2 $19) 60... Rb1+ 61.
    Kf2 Rb2+ $11) 56. d5 $1 e5 57. Ra4 f5 $4 {What Topalov do ?} (57... Nxf2 58.
    Kg3 e4 59. Kxf2 Rb2+ 60. Kf1 (60. Kg3 Rg2+ 61. Kf4 f2 62. Ra1 Rg1 $19) 60...
    Rb1+ 61. Kf2 Rb2+ $11) 58. Nxe5 $18 Rb2 (58... Rb2 59. Nd3 Rc2 60. Rd4 Rc7 (
    60... Nd6 61. Kg3 $18) 61. d6 Rd7 62. Rd5 Rxd6 63. Rxf5+ Kh6 64. Ne5 $18) 59.
    Nd3 (59. Rxe4 $5 fxe4 60. Kg3 Rb5 61. Kf4 Rxd5 62. Kxe4 Ra5 63. Nd3 $1 Kh4 64.
    Nf4 $18) 59... Rb7 60. Rd4 Rb6 61. d6 (61. d6 Nxd6 62. Kg3 Ne4+ 63. Kxf3 Ng5+
    64. Kg3 $18) 61... Nxd6 62. Kg3 Ne4+ 63. Kxf3 Kg5 (63... Kg5 64. h4+ Kxh4 65.
    Nc5 $1 $18) 64. h4+ $1 {
    A final and elegant end! Very dramatically! I think Topalov must resign here.}
    Kf6 65. Rd5 {Topalov continues the agony...} Nc3 66. Rd8 Rb1 67. Rf8+ Ke6 68.
    Nf4+ (68. Nf4+ Ke5 69. Re8+ Kf6 70. h5 $18) 68... Ke5 69. Re8+ Kf6 70. Nh5+ Kg6
    71. Ng3 Rb2 {The further game doesn't need of annotations.} 72. h5+ Kf7 (72...
    Kf7 73. h6 $1) 73. Re5 Nd1 74. Ne2 Kf6 75. Rd5 {It's over. A very dramaticaly
    game. Topalov show a very good fighting abilities, but Kramnik was like a
    stone, and at the end the tense moment was a decisive. Veselin made a critical
    mistake and lose the game. Hope to see you and tomorrow!} 1-0
  3. 21 Jan '08 09:25
    what's a good way of quickly copying the PNG into something and seeing the moves as opposed to using my head?
    Any free software?

    Also who did the commenting for the game?
    "Hope to see you and tomorrow"
    Is the person doubting whether they'll live to breathe another day?
  4. Subscriber RDM
    21 Jan '08 10:41
    Head ...
    Exploding ...
    Brain ...
    Sore ...
  5. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    21 Jan '08 10:45
    Originally posted by pijun
    what's a good way of quickly copying the PNG into something and seeing the moves as opposed to using my head?
    Any free software?

    Also who did the commenting for the game?
    "Hope to see you and tomorrow"
    Is the person doubting whether they'll live to breathe another day?
    Winboard is a quick way to do that. You just have to copy the text into the clipboard and then paste it.
  6. 21 Jan '08 13:00
    You can also look at the game here:

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1430918
  7. 21 Jan '08 15:00
    Originally posted by mtthw
    You can also look at the game here:

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1430918
    It says on chess games that Kramnik 'needs' to play 22.e3. Whys this?
  8. 21 Jan '08 15:27
    Originally posted by pijun
    what's a good way of quickly copying the PNG into something and seeing the moves as opposed to using my head?
    Any free software?

    Also who did the commenting for the game?
    "Hope to see you and tomorrow"
    Is the person doubting whether they'll live to breathe another day?
    You can copy and paste this on to any text format, notepad works well and is one of the basic text programs on your computer. Save the file with a .pgn extension and then open it using your chess program. I use Chess Base light and it's sufficiently strong for my purposes as well as being free.
  9. 21 Jan '08 22:31
    Originally posted by demonseed
    You can copy and paste this on to any text format, notepad works well and is one of the basic text programs on your computer. Save the file with a .pgn extension and then open it using your chess program. I use Chess Base light and it's sufficiently strong for my purposes as well as being free.
    you don't need to save it at all! You have to get it together as one thing in a place like notepad yes..but then you can just press CTRL-A and then CTRL-C and then go into chessbase light and open a new board and press CTRL-V the game will pop up in the final position and (if you have the notation pane open) so will the moves and annotations.