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  1. 03 May '08 00:52 / 1 edit
    I found this amazing game of the kings indian defence by David Bronstein and Borris Spassky, i think, check this out

    1.d4 Nf6
    2.c4 g3
    3.Nc3 Bg7
    4.e4 d6
    5.f3 0-0
    6.Be3 e5
    7.d5 Nh5
    8.Qd2 Qh4
    9.g3 Nxg3
    10.Qf2 Nxf1
    11.Qxh4 Nxe3
    12.Ke2 Nxc4
    13. Rc1 Na6

    black gets two pawns and two minor pieces for his queen, wonderfully creative play by Bronstein. If anyone knows of any kings Indian resources could they let me know - kind regards robert.
  2. 03 May '08 01:04
    Do you know what date this game was played? Even the year, cheers.
  3. 03 May '08 01:08
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    I found this amazing game of the kings indian defence by David Bronstein and Borris Spassky, i think, check this out

    1.d4 Nf6
    2.c4 g3
    3.Nc3 Bg7
    4.e4 d6
    5.f3 0-0
    6.Be3 e5
    7.d5 Nh5
    8.Qd2 Qh4
    9.g3 Nxg3
    10.Qf2 Nxf1
    11.Qxh4 Nxe3
    12.Ke2 Nxc4
    13. Rc1 Na6

    black gets two pawns and two minor pieces for his queen, wonderfully creative play by ...[text shortened]... If anyone knows of any kings Indian resources could they let me know - kind regards robert.
    This line has been played many times in the shredder opening database.
  4. Standard member Korch
    Chess Warrior
    03 May '08 01:48
    [Event "Amsterdam"]
    [Site "ct"]
    [Date "1956.??.??"]
    [EventDate "?"]
    [Round "?"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [White "Boris Spassky"]
    [Black "David Bronstein"]
    [ECO "E80"]
    [WhiteElo "?"]
    [BlackElo "?"]
    [PlyCount "95"]

    1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 e5 6. d5 Nh5
    7. Be3 Na6 8. Qd2 Qh4+ 9. g3 Nxg3 10. Qf2 Nxf1 11. Qxh4 Nxe3
    12. Kf2 Nxc4 13. b3 Nb6 14. Nge2 f5 15. Rhg1 O-O 16. Kg2 Bd7
    17. a4 Bf6 18. Qg3 Nb4 19. a5 Nc8 20. exf5 Bxf5 21. Ra4 Nd3
    22. Rc4 Nc5 23. Ne4 Na6 24. Nxf6+ Rxf6 25. f4 e4 26. Nc3 Ne7
    27. Re1 Raf8 28. b4 c6 29. Nxe4 Bxe4+ 30. Rcxe4 Nxd5 31. Re8
    Nac7 32. Rxf8+ Kxf8 33. Kh1 Rf5 34. Qh4 Nf6 35. Qf2 Nb5
    36. Qe2 Nd5 37. a6 bxa6 38. Qe8+ Kg7 39. Qxc6 Kh6 40. Qxa6
    Nxb4 41. Qb7 Nd3 42. Re7 Nxf4 43. Rxh7+ Kg5 44. Qe7+ Kg4
    45. Qe3 Kg5 46. h4+ Kg4 47. Kh2 Nh5 48. Rh6 1-0
  5. 03 May '08 02:25
    I'm sitting here reading "Chess: the Art of Logical Thinking" by Neil McDonald and flipping back and forth in the RHP forums when I stumbled on this thread. From page 174: "When the King's Indian was first developed in the 1950's by David Bronstein and others...."

    Damn, he developed one of the major defenses to d4? Was he really that good? I need to get a book of his games!
  6. Standard member Korch
    Chess Warrior
    03 May '08 08:33
    Originally posted by MontyMoose
    I'm sitting here reading "Chess: the Art of Logical Thinking" by Neil McDonald and flipping back and forth in the RHP forums when I stumbled on this thread. From page 174: "When the King's Indian was first developed in the 1950's by David Bronstein and others...."

    Damn, he developed one of the major defenses to d4? Was he really that good? I need to get a book of his games!
    In 1951 David Bronstein tied with Botvinnik in world championship match. He could win, but he was more artist than sportsman.
  7. 03 May '08 08:46
    Originally posted by Korch
    [Event "Amsterdam"]
    [Site "ct"]
    [Date "1956.??.??"]
    [EventDate "?"]
    [Round "?"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [White "Boris Spassky"]
    [Black "David Bronstein"]
    [ECO "E80"]
    [WhiteElo "?"]
    [BlackElo "?"]
    [PlyCount "95"]

    1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 e5 6. d5 Nh5
    7. Be3 Na6 8. Qd2 Qh4+ 9. g3 Nxg3 10. Qf2 Nxf1 11. Qxh4 Nxe3
    12. Kf2 Nxc4 13. b3 Nb6 ...[text shortened]... Rxh7+ Kg5 44. Qe7+ Kg4
    45. Qe3 Kg5 46. h4+ Kg4 47. Kh2 Nh5 48. Rh6 1-0
    oh man, its a pity spassky won after bronsteins, imho very artisic play, Kings Indian rules!
  8. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    03 May '08 21:39
    Originally posted by MontyMoose
    I'm sitting here reading "Chess: the Art of Logical Thinking" by Neil McDonald and flipping back and forth in the RHP forums when I stumbled on this thread. From page 174: "When the King's Indian was first developed in the 1950's by David Bronstein and others...."

    Damn, he developed one of the major defenses to d4? Was he really that good? I need to get a book of his games!
    Bronstein really was that good. And one thing I really admire on him is his creativity. Along with Kasparov he's in my top of chess.

    I don't have it but people say that "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" is a really good book.

    1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6 9.c3 Be7 10.Bc2 O-O 11.Qe2 f5 12.exf6 Bxf6 13.Nbd2 Bf5 14.Nxe4 Bxe4 15.Bxe4 dxe4 16.Qxe4 Qd7 17.Bf4 Rae8 18.Qc2 Bh4 19.Bg3 Bxg3 20.hxg3 Ne5 21.Nxe5 Rxe5 22.Rfe1 Rd5 23.Rad1 c5 24.a4 Rd8 25.Rxd5 Qxd5 26.axb5 axb5 27.Qe2 b4 28.cxb4 cxb4 29.Qg4 b3 30.Kh2 Qf7 31.Qg5 Rd7 32.f3 h6 33.Qe3 Rd8 34.g4 Kh8 35.Qb6 Rd2 36.Qb8+ Kh7 37.Re8 Qxf3 38.Rh8+ Kg6 39.Rxh6+ (see diagram) Bronstein: "Kortchnoi remained unruffled. He wrote down my move on his scoresheet and began carefully studying the position. I think it seemed incredible to him that White could sacrifice his last rook (I myself could not believe my eyes!). And only when he had convinced himself, did he stop the clocks. These are the variations: A) 39... Kf7 40.Qc7+ Kg8 41.Qc8+ Kf7 42.Qe6+ Kf8 43.Rh8 mate; B) 39... Kg5 40.Qe5+ Kxg4 41.Rg6+ Kh4 42.Qg5 mate; C) 39... gxh6 40.Qg8+ Kf6 41.Qf8+; D) 39... Kxh6 40.Qh8+ Kg6 41.Qh5+ Kf6 42.g5+!"[1] 1-0

    But to tell the truth the KID was developed in the 50's ith Bronstein and he others... That opening was long known for black but normally it was looked down because of the permanent weak d-pawn. What they did waht to show that black had a lot of dynamics to show for it and with this new knowledge the opening became available once again.

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1033870,
    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1034661, a real deep and sound rook sac...
    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1035015, kicking a Najdorf's guru butt on his playground.
    http://br.youtube.com/watch?v=WoUo9N4IKW4

    Sorry this great amount of information but I feel like i'm just making justice to a great player and on of my chess heroes.
  9. Standard member Chipotle
    Pawn Grubber
    04 May '08 00:43
    Originally posted by MontyMoose
    I'm sitting here reading "Chess: the Art of Logical Thinking" by Neil McDonald and flipping back and forth in the RHP forums when I stumbled on this thread. From page 174: "When the King's Indian was first developed in the 1950's by David Bronstein and others...."

    Damn, he developed one of the major defenses to d4? Was he really that good? I need to get a book of his games!
    Bronstein is one of my all time favorites, for both his play and the books he wrote. The ones I have:

    Zurich International Chess Tournament 1953. One of the all time greats, with excellent analysis that shows understanding rather than reams of computer generated analysis.

    Sorcerer's Apprentice. More focus on Bronstein, obviously. Again, nearly every game of his teaches something. I like the annotations more than the tactics section.

    200 Open Games. Like getting 200 Sunday paper chess columns, only written by the man.

    Bronstein on the King's Indian. Great book, though not the latest KID theory. He has two chapters explaining the purpose of each piece in the KID. Ken Neat did a great job pulling this book together with Bronstein.

    Much like Tal, Bronstein has a way of commenting on his thinking during a game, which gives great insight into what really goes on in a game at that level.
  10. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    04 May '08 00:58
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    But to tell the truth the KID was developed in the 50's ith Bronstein and he others... That opening was long known for black but normally it was looked down because of the permanent weak d-pawn. What they did waht to show that black had a lot of dynamics to show for it and with this new knowledge the opening became available once again.
    I meant to say that the KID wasn't developed in the 50's...
    But now that I think again, maybe in a sense one can say that it was indeed developed in the 50's: It was invented/discovered earlier but only with Bronstein, Geller and the others something was done out of it.



    PS: I think I was drunk when I wrote the first post... So many typos it even hurts to read.
  11. 04 May '08 00:59
    I loved seeing Yasser's video clip story again! I saw it when the Chessbase obit came out in 2006, but it was fun seeing it again. Yasser's a great storyteller!
  12. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    04 May '08 12:18
    Originally posted by Korch
    In 1951 David Bronstein tied with Botvinnik in world championship match. He could win, but he was more artist than sportsman.
    That and the fact that he was visited by the KGB the night before the final game...
  13. Standard member Korch
    Chess Warrior
    04 May '08 12:46 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by JonathanB of London
    That and the fact that he was visited by the KGB the night before the final game...
    Its not fact.

    The fact is that shortly before 23th game (there were 24 games in that match) Bronstein was invited by minister of State Security or MGB Viktor Abakumov to his box in theatre where that match was played. Before that game Bronstein was leading and after his loss result became even again. Bronstein could not win also last, 24th game.

    That was base of rumors that Bronstein was made to lose that match

    According to Bronstein himself Abakumov only introduced Bronstein his wife and wished good luck in match.

    And even after USSR collapsed Bronstein denied rumors about KGB making him lose that match.
  14. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    04 May '08 14:11 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Korch
    Its not fact.
    I purposefully didn't say Bronstein was made to lose beacuse I was aware that although he had acknowledged the meeting took place he had not revealed publicly (at least as far as I was aware) the contents of the meeting.

    As for what was said during this little chat I, of course, have no idea. Still, I think it reasonable to assume it didn't help the challenger's state of mind.


    My mistake about the timing - I'd recalled it was towards the end of the match and my mind obviously misremembered that as at the very end.
  15. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    04 May '08 14:17
    http://br.youtube.com/watch?v=WoUo9N4IKW4
    Great clip - thanks for that.

    I met Bronstein very briefly once. And I mean very briefly - it was a matter of seconds during a weekend tournament in Swansea in the early 1990s.

    A little while after we'd bumped into each other I looked up to see him standing near my board observing my game. Quite a gesture considering I was playing at a very low level compared to him (I was in the bottom or next to bottom section) and he had to walk some way from his table to mine (not to mention the fact that he'd obviously taken the trouble to find out where I was playing - something that hadn't even crossed my mind he would do.)

    Unfortunately I was in the middle of a more than usually turgid c3 sicilian at the time. I'm not sure he was convinced it was worth the trip.

    Not much of a story but its one of my more pleasing chess memories.