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  1. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    02 May '12 05:53
    "Attack always attack"- Adolf Anderssen
    “Only the player with the initiative has the right to attack.”- Wilhelm Steinitz



    Baswed on these quotes what could one expect??


    [Event "It London"]
    [Site "It London"]
    [Date "1866[/b.??.??"]
    [EventDate "?"]
    [Round "?"]]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [White "Adolf Anderssen"]
    [Black "Wilhelm Steinitz"]
    [ECO "C65"]
    [WhiteElo "?"]
    [BlackElo "?"]
    [PlyCount "86"]

  2. 02 May '12 13:42 / 1 edit
    I think the game fits both quotes well. Anderssen tried to attack from the off, whereas Steinitz defended as much as he needed to (and no more) and then launched his own typical King's Indian kingside hack.

    When to stop defending and start your counterattack is a very difficult thing to determine. When to stop attacking and play a defensive move or two is much easier to decide - Never! Once you start doing that your position goes downhill rapidly.

    I remember going through this game years ago and thinking that I would have played 35. Bh3+ in an instant, it seems so counter-intuitive to pass on the chance of bringing another piece into the attack.
  3. 03 May '12 13:37 / 1 edit
    One of my favourite games is an Anderssen game.
    One he is reported to have lost!

    It has been re-printed over and over again as Adolf Anderssen - Max Lange 1859.
    But Edward Winter has very good evidence to show that it was analysis between
    Anderssen and Lange from a game between Anderssen and Jean Dufrense round
    about 1851 the same time as Dufrense was losing the Evergreen Game.

    http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=7123

    Adolf Anderssen - Max Lange (analysis) from Adolf Anderssen - Jean Dufresne (1851?)

  4. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    03 May '12 14:12
    Definitely a Maximum effort 🙂
  5. 04 May '12 12:38
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    "Attack always attack"- Adolf Anderssen
    “Only the player with the initiative has the right to attack.”- Wilhelm Steinitz


    Baswed on these quotes what could one expect??
    Based on those quotes I would not have expected Anderssen to play d3 in the Spanish. What on earth is that, a cowardly reverse-Steinitz?

    Richard
  6. 05 May '12 00:27
    Hi SB.

    The Lopez was still finding it's feet back then, every game was writing a new
    page of theory. Round about 1870-1880 the strength of the opening was
    beginning to be realised.

    Up intil 1870 King's Gambits and Evans Gambits were far
    more common than a Lopez.

    The openings from the 1872 Steinitz - Zukertort match. 12 Games.

    Evans Gambit 3

    King's Gambit 3

    Giuoco Piano 2

    Ruy Lopez 2

    Dutch 2

    Steinitz Won 7 - 1 with 4 draws.

    I cannot recall a Kings Gambit or an Evans being played in a world title match
    since 1900. Karpov and Korchnoi produced a couple of Giuoco Pianos and there is
    possibly a Four Knights knocking about somehwere. (Lasker - Tarrasch?)
    But since 1900 1.e4 e5 has usually gone into a Lopez.
  7. 05 May '12 00:54
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi SB.

    The Lopez was still finding it's feet back then, every game was writing a new
    page of theory. Round about 1870-1880 the strength of the opening was
    beginning to be realised.

    Up intil 1870 King's Gambits and Evans Gambits were far
    more common than a Lopez.

    The openings from the 1872 Steinitz - Zukertort match. 12 Games.

    Evans Gambit ...[text shortened]... about somehwere. (Lasker - Tarrasch?)
    But since 1900 1.e4 e5 has usually gone into a Lopez.
    Kasparov Short had a Scotch or 2? Or were they non title games?