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  1. 02 Jan '17 18:21 / 1 edit
    From my little experience it seems to me that beginners usually play on the kingside looking for the checkmate. I do not think that is such a bad thing to do until you know better.

    So what should you do? Develop your knights, bishops, queen and rooks while at the same time keeping your king safe. Unless you have a reason, it is generally not good to move the pawns in front of your king. Your king supports all three pawns in front of him and the pawns control the four squares in front of them.


    Is there a name for that opening by white?

    In the picture above notice white's rooks are not developed but they are connected. Only three of black's pieces are ready to defend the kingside. Two of black's protective pawns are advanced creating further weaknesses around the black king. The attack is on and the overwhelming force that white can bring to the kingside with the speed of superior mobility.



    In short, develop your pieces not your pawns and get those pieces in position to attack your opponent's king and defend yours. Try to not get your pieces stuck behind your pawns.

    I'd love it if others presented similar instructive games on openings.
  2. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    02 Jan '17 20:15 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Eladar
    From my little experience it seems to me that beginners usually play on the kingside looking for the checkmate. I do not think that is such a bad thing to do until you know better.

    So what should you do? Develop your knights, bishops, queen and rooks while at the same time keeping your king safe. Unless you have a reason, it is generally not good to move ...[text shortened]... uck behind your pawns.

    I'd love it if others presented similar instructive games on openings.
    I did not care for 2...h6 in that game. The idea is probably to play ...Nf6 without having to worry about a Bg5 pin, but it's too soon to tell if that pin is even worth worrying about. [Maybe it just spends two moves to trade a black piece that's only moved once after ...Nf6 Bg5 Be7 BxN?! If so, Black should be happy with it...]

    2...d5 is one obvious, and better, move.
  3. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    02 Jan '17 20:23
    Another thing that jumps out at me when I look at your first diagram:



    ...is how much Black wishes his pawns were at g6 and h7, instead of g5 and h6. White would actually do better playing on the Queenside in such a structure, because Black's King position is harder to assail, and he's semi-committed to Queenside play with the c-pawn on c4.
  4. 02 Jan '17 20:33 / 1 edit
    How often is an a pawn or h pawn a good move on the second move?

    Better to develop pieces or move pawns that allow you to move pieces, or control the center of the board.

    How high of a level of player do you think it would take to realize that c4 commits to queenside play?
  5. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    02 Jan '17 21:17
    Originally posted by Eladar
    How high of a level of player do you think it would take to realize that c4 commits to queenside play?
    Probably higher than mine. 😛

    The "semi" is in there because I'm not sure I understand all the nuances / commitments accompanying c4 myself...
  6. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    24 Jan '17 03:56
    Hi,

    I recommend taking a look at the device of many c4 beginners. The Botvinnik system. Pawns at c4, d3, and e4. The idea works best when blacks Nf6 has been played with a pawn remaining on f7. The general idea is to push f4 with hopes of either f5, or a delayed d4. The kings night plays best from e2.

    If you're a hyper modern man you may enjoy learning Nimzovitch & Larsen's lines with g3. They play well against Caro-Kann and Slav like structures in my experience.

    These are all extremely sound and can certainly lead to devestating kingside assaults.

    -GIN