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  1. 17 Sep '12 22:26
    no, its against the rules
  2. 17 Sep '12 22:27
    Sadly, you can't. I wish you could, though. It'd be useful for getting out of check or mate.
  3. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    17 Sep '12 22:39
    It is a strange rule. If castling is for keeping the King safe, then why is the option removed when he needs it most?
  4. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    17 Sep '12 23:28
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    You may not castle into, out of, or across a check.
  5. 18 Sep '12 02:38
    No. Caslting out of check is forbidden.

    You can however do this. (watch Black's 12th move - once you see this
    idea you will never forget it.)

    Hoffmann - Petroff Warsaw, 1844

  6. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    18 Sep '12 11:41 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    No. Caslting out of check is forbidden.

    You can however do this. (watch Black's 12th move - once you see this
    idea you will never forget it.)

    Hoffmann - Petroff Warsaw, 1844

    [pgn]
    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 Ne4 7. Bd5 Nxf2
    8. Kxf2 dxc3+ 9. Kg3 cxb2 10. Bxb2 Ne7 11. Ng5 Nxd5 12. Nxf7
    {White is expecting 12....Kx ...[text shortened]... + 16. Kg4 Nxe6 17. Nxe6 Bxe6+ 18. Kg5 Rf5+ 19. Kg4 h5+ 20. Kh3 Rf3{Double Check and Mate}[/pgn]
    Very interesting game. These guys were good. Just letting the queen go so early in the game and seeing the mate so far in advance. Pretty spectacular! Thanks for sharing greenpawn34.

    BTW, Who was playing black?? Amazing chess player.
  7. 18 Sep '12 13:02
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    It is a strange rule. If castling is for keeping the King safe, then why is the option removed when he needs it most?
    That's exactly why it is forbidden, surely? Castling is a security move, preparing a safe haven for your king - so you can't use it when he's already under attack.

    Richard
  8. 18 Sep '12 13:22
    "BTW, Who was playing black?? Amazing chess player."

    Alexander Dmitrievich Petrov. Russian Chess Player/Author (1794-1867).
    (In the 'Oxford Chess Companion' he is named as Petroff.)

    He's the lad after whom the Petrov (or Petroff) Defence is named.
  9. 18 Sep '12 13:38
    Originally posted by KingDavid403
    ...and seeing the mate so far in advance...
    Yeah, seems very suspicious to me. Hmm..1844...I think the Atari 800 was available then.
  10. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    18 Sep '12 14:30
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    That's exactly why it is forbidden, surely? Castling is a security move, preparing a safe haven for your king - so you can't use it when he's already under attack.

    Richard
    If there are no pieces between the King and the Rook, the haven is already prepared.
  11. Subscriber thaughbaer
    Duckfinder General
    18 Sep '12 15:48
    Originally posted by MontyMoose
    Yeah, seems very suspicious to me. Hmm..1844...I think the Atari 800 was available then.
    Damn right. He's only rated 1660 on here User 687289. You can't get past me by faking your death 180 years ago.
  12. 18 Sep '12 16:28
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    It is a strange rule. If castling is for keeping the King safe, then why is the option removed when he needs it most?
    The option of moving pawns two squares at a time was introduced to avoid games starting e3,e6,e4,e5 - it was a short cut. However, the short cut wasn't intended to avoid situations where the pawn could be captured if it had to move one square at a time - hence the "en passant" rule.

    Similarly, castling was introduced to avoid players having to artificially castle by e.g. Ke2/Re1/Kf1/Kg1. But like the "pawns two squares" short cut, there was a desire to keep the spirit of the game when the king was under attack - i.e. speedup artificial castling but don't support a new quick escape method for the king. It was an attempt to be practical while minimising the impact on the original game.
  13. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    18 Sep '12 17:31
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    No. Caslting out of check is forbidden.

    You can however do this. (watch Black's 12th move - once you see this
    idea you will never forget it.)

    Hoffmann - Petroff Warsaw, 1844

    [pgn]
    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 Ne4 7. Bd5 Nxf2
    8. Kxf2 dxc3+ 9. Kg3 cxb2 10. Bxb2 Ne7 11. Ng5 Nxd5 12. Nxf7
    {White is expecting 12....Kx ...[text shortened]... + 16. Kg4 Nxe6 17. Nxe6 Bxe6+ 18. Kg5 Rf5+ 19. Kg4 h5+ 20. Kh3 Rf3{Double Check and Mate}[/pgn]
    You remind me much of a good friend of mine. You and he never cease to amaze me.
    Thanks again for posting pure chess gold.
  14. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    18 Sep '12 18:31
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    "BTW, Who was playing black?? Amazing chess player."

    Alexander Dmitrievich Petrov. Russian Chess Player/Author (1794-1867).
    (In the 'Oxford Chess Companion' he is named as Petroff.)

    He's the lad after whom the Petrov (or Petroff) Defence is named.
    Thanks again.
  15. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    18 Sep '12 18:38
    Originally posted by MontyMoose
    Yeah, seems very suspicious to me. Hmm..1844...I think the Atari 800 was available then.
    lol I also thought something along those lines. I'm sure this was a OTB game also. Pretty amazing chess play.