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  1. 13 Oct '09 20:45
    Imagine stacked, black rooks. The base, black rook is pinned to the black king by a white bishop. The free black rook moves next to the white king giving check. Can the white king take the attacking black rook because the supporting black rook is pinned to the black king?
  2. 13 Oct '09 20:47
    Originally posted by ParShooter
    Imagine stacked, black rooks. The base, black rook is pinned to the black king by a white bishop. The free black rook moves next to the white king giving check. Can the white king take the attacking black rook because the supporting black rook is pinned to the black king?
    Will the king enter check? Then no the king may not capture the rook.
  3. 13 Oct '09 20:55
    But, but, but... The supporting piece is pinned!

    That doesn't matter. A king can't move into check, even if the piece that would put the king in check is pinned.

    A pinned piece can even support a checkmate.
  4. 13 Oct '09 21:09
    Originally posted by Eladar
    But, but, but... The supporting piece is pinned!

    That doesn't matter. A king can't move into check, even if the piece that would put the king in check is pinned.

    A pinned piece can even support a checkmate.
    Thank you!
  5. 13 Oct '09 21:32
    Originally posted by Eladar
    But, but, but... The supporting piece is pinned!

    That doesn't matter. A king can't move into check, even if the piece that would put the king in check is pinned.

    A pinned piece can even support a checkmate.
    sometimes, if circumstances allow, a pinned piece can deliver checkmate...though I am sure those rarely occur
  6. 13 Oct '09 21:42
    Originally posted by c guy1
    sometimes, if circumstances allow, a pinned piece can deliver checkmate...though I am sure those rarely occur
    I think it was schakuhr who gave an amusing pin-pin-pin example a while ago.

    This question pops up more often on Internet message boards and I never understand what the hassle is about
  7. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    14 Oct '09 00:40
    Originally posted by ParShooter
    Imagine stacked, black rooks. The base, black rook is pinned to the black king by a white bishop. The free black rook moves next to the white king giving check. Can the white king take the attacking black rook because the supporting black rook is pinned to the black king?
    No - because the white king would die first.
  8. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    14 Oct '09 00:47
    Originally posted by c guy1
    sometimes, if circumstances allow, a pinned piece can deliver checkmate...though I am sure those rarely occur
    You can even mate with ALL of your pieces pinned.

  9. 14 Oct '09 14:00
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    You can even mate with ALL of your pieces pinned.

    [fen]2r5/2Q5/4p3/3k4/4b3/3R4/rBK3Bq/8 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    Can you come up with a plausible #2 too?
  10. 14 Oct '09 16:01
    The real answer to this question is to go to the FIDE website : -
    http://www.fide.com/component/handbook/?id=32&view=category
    Then click on E.I.01A Laws of Chess
    Then go to Article 3.9
    "The king is said to be 'in check' if it is attacked by one or more of the opponent's pieces, even if such pieces are constrained from moving to that square because they would then leave or place their own king in check. No piece can be moved that will either expose the king of the same colour to check or leave that king in check."
  11. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    14 Oct '09 21:06
    Originally posted by heinzkat
    Can you come up with a plausible #2 too?
    Plausible compositions are so bleh.
  12. 15 Oct '09 19:52
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    Plausible compositions are so bleh.
    But can you? I am sure there are some compositions, but most of the time the "pinned piece" just uncovers another piece's check(mate).