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  1. 20 Jul '17 16:29 / 1 edit
    How do you actually carry out candidate moves when you play? I had a guy tell me that I should identify all of my candidate moves, then decide which move would be the the best move to make.

    My mind doesn't work like that very well because as I think about new moves Itend to forget about old moves. Instead I seem to do best by seeing a move that I like, then try to find something wrong with it, then find other moves and compare it to my favorite move at the moment. If it looks better, I look for something wrong with it and if it comes out clean it becomes my new favorite move. Once I have exhausted my search I make the move.

    Of course thats when I am not just lazy and playing the first obvious move I see. Sometimes those are decent enough moves, sometimes they hurt.

    In any case, how do you work out your candidate moves?
  2. 20 Jul '17 19:39
    In famous book "Road to chess mastery" by Yudovich, Averbakh and Bondarevsky (all of them members of KGB by-the-way, but it's not important now) they introduced syntagma "tree of moves" in order to make their pupils to discipline their mind and spending of time.

    Player should determine reasonable number of moves in that tree (or candidate moves in Anglo-saxon translation), and then sharply and with determination and without regret analyze them ona by one, in order of priority (that is, by feeling which move looks strongest).

    It s final result of Soviet school of chess: don't be a slave of principles and habits, but analyze each position by its own!

    But this rule of move tree requires a minimum of calculation abilities. If you are forgetful and coward, and if you cannot see more than 2 moves in advance, you will lose confidence and you can mix moves from different candidates - typical oversight!
  3. 20 Jul '17 22:44
    Originally posted by @vandervelde
    In famous book "Road to chess mastery" by Yudovich, Averbakh and Bondarevsky (all of them members of KGB by-the-way, but it's not important now) they introduced syntagma "tree of moves" in order to make their pupils to discipline their mind and spending of time.

    Player should determine reasonable number of moves in that tree (or candidate moves in An ...[text shortened]... e, you will lose confidence and you can mix moves from different candidates - typical oversight!
    Is the tree supposed to be made of forced moves or with an assumption of what your opponent is going to probably play?

    I imagine that the better you get, the more reliable the logical play of the opponent.
  4. 21 Jul '17 01:06
    Ok, I think I get it now.

    Wow that's a lot of thought for each move.

    For each candidate move you calculate the reasonable replies going out even two or three moves this would take much mental work.
  5. 21 Jul '17 01:55 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by @eladar
    How do you actually carry out candidate moves when you play? I had a guy tell me that I should identify all of my candidate moves, then decide which move would be the the best move to make.

    My mind doesn't work like that very well because as I think about new moves Itend to forget about old moves. Instead I seem to do best by seeing a move that I like, th ...[text shortened]... ent enough moves, sometimes they hurt.

    In any case, how do you work out your candidate moves?
    In any case, how do you work out your candidate moves?


    JMHO - I write down what I think is the most promising of candidate moves and my analysis of each, but follow no more than 3 lines of play in a day, the same for the next day. With 7 days or more to make a move I usually pick a decent one, but never move in less than 5 days once in the middle or end game. Not a foolproof plan of course, but I've won a lot of games off the mistakes of others because they moved too fast.. In correspondence chess the tortoise will defeat the rabbit most of the time.
  6. 21 Jul '17 03:23
    Originally posted by @mchill
    In any case, how do you work out your candidate moves?


    JMHO - I write down what I think is the most promising of candidate moves and my analysis of each, but follow no more than 3 lines of play in a day, the same for the next day. With 7 days or more to make a move I usually pick a decent one, but never move in less than 5 days once in the middle or end ...[text shortened]... y moved too fast.. In correspondence chess the tortoise will defeat the rabbit most of the time.
    Do you do anything like this while playing over the board?
  7. 21 Jul '17 15:36
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Do you do anything like this while playing over the board?
    No. I can't see something like that working in an OTB format anyway.
  8. 21 Jul '17 16:34
    Originally posted by @mchill
    No. I can't see something like that working in an OTB format anyway.
    What do you do in OTB games?
  9. 21 Jul '17 22:56 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by @eladar
    What do you do in OTB games?
    I left the OTB scene back in the mid 90's. When I did play OTB, I'd calculate as best I could within the time control, make my move, and write it down like everyone else. My USCF rating was about 1600.
  10. 21 Jul '17 22:58
    Originally posted by @mchill
    I left the OTB scene back in the mid 90's. When I did play OTB, I'd calculate as best I could within the time control, make my move, and write it down like everyone else. My USCF rating was about 1600.
    Did you identify all your good possible moves first then calculate each one? Or did you calculate one then look for another?
  11. 21 Jul '17 23:10
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Did you identify all your good possible moves first then calculate each one? Or did you calculate one then look for another?
    Did you identify all your good possible moves first then calculate each one?

    Yes, that's how I did it, though sometimes I wasn't as disciplined about it as I should have been.