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  1. 27 Jul '10 23:32
    Why isn't it allowed?
  2. 28 Jul '10 00:09
    Originally posted by Zelnick
    Why isn't it allowed?
    Because it's against the rules.
  3. 28 Jul '10 00:12 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Zelnick
    Why isn't it allowed?
    The straightfoward answer is "that's the rules". But if you're wondering why the rule was chosen, it's probably because castiling was introduced (just like pawns moving two squares) to provide a short cut way of doing what many players did using multiple moves. i.e. prior to the ability to castle, players artificially castled by letting the rook out and then walking the king over to the side, using several moves to do so. Castling was seen as a pragmatic addition to the rules.

    However, such "short cut rules" should never provide new possibilities. If a king was in checkmate prior to the rule, then it should be checkmate with the new rule in place. But this would not always be the case if the king could castle out of check. Hence it's not allowed.



    Checkmate before and after the castling rule was introduced.
  4. 28 Jul '10 01:00
    Originally posted by Zelnick
    Why isn't it allowed?
    King: No king should have to walk so much.
    Jester: I know, let's save all this kludgy business with the king walking around the rook and invent this move. Lets call if going into the, uh, castle.

    ...later

    Jester: Hah! I castled out of mate!
    King: Oh no you didn't.

    Bonk!

    ...later

    Jester (to the court): Let it be known that in this castle, you can't castle out of mate, any more than I could castle out of that bonk!
  5. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    28 Jul '10 01:08
    There will always be new possibilities provided by a drastic rule change. Here's one example:



    White to move - who wins?
    a) Castling not allowed by rule
    b) Castling allowed by rule
  6. 28 Jul '10 01:16 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    There will always be new possibilities provided by a drastic rule change. Here's one example
    Here's another example:



    Checkmate prior to pawns being able to move two moves, but not afterwards.

    My choice of words was indeed incorrect. Maybe there was an attempt to minimise new possibilities?! Is that more accurate?!
  7. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    28 Jul '10 04:26
    Originally posted by Varenka
    Here's another example:

    [fen]8/8/8/7r/K6q/7r/1P5k/8[/fen]

    Checkmate prior to pawns being able to move two moves, but not afterwards.

    My choice of words was indeed incorrect. Maybe there was an attempt to minimise new possibilities?! Is that more accurate?!
    I think it was just to help get the King to safety as fast as possible. The Q and B had just had their powers greatly augmented and the game was going through a big period of change.
  8. 28 Jul '10 20:48
    Castling seems like such a complicated manouver
    that when one is under attack it becomes impossible to do since its just to difficult.

    Maybe like chewing bubblegum is only allowed between boxing rounds not during.

    Like castling isn`t allowed during a check.

    Varenka had nice ideas too.

    Who knows exactly what the rule committee exactly was thinking.
  9. 28 Jul '10 21:33
    Originally posted by National Master Dale


    Who knows exactly what the rule committee exactly was thinking.[/b]
    The present method of castling was introduced in the mid 16th century by a priest named Ruy Lopez not by a rule committee.
  10. 29 Jul '10 02:20
    All you need to know.

    The history of and birth of castling is right down the bottom of the piece.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castling

    I know it's Wikipedia but whoever wrote this knows
    a thing or two about caslting and it is very well researched.
  11. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    19 Aug '10 08:37
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    All you need to know.

    The history of and birth of castling is right down the bottom of the piece.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castling

    I know it's Wikipedia but whoever wrote this knows
    a thing or two about caslting and it is very well researched.
    Thyats a great link GP! The section "Notable Castlings" is very amusing.

    Prior to the Rule change did anyone attempt 'vertical' castling in a recorded game?