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  1. 11 Jul '11 14:07
    On another thread people were asking about playing
    e5 or c5 in the King's Indian.

    I replied the 'rule of thuimb' is to watch where the c1 Bishop goes.
    If it goes to to g5 then c5 is the centre buster.

    Rd3 of the Scottish saw Bg5 and Black hitting the centre with c5.
    White walks into an opening trap.

    R.Kynoch - H.Olsen



    I rememeber White from 30 years ago, he was always suspect
    to the odd opening trap. Twice, yes Twice he walked into this.

    I'm Black.



    Though to be fair he was a youngster then, also I think he leads
    in our OTB encounters over the years. (it may be level...I can recall 3 losses.)
  2. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    11 Jul '11 15:53
    hmm, I've always wondered about c5 lines in the leningrad, which are almost identical to your position, but it never occurred to me it might be connected to c1 bishop. thanks for bringing the thought up!
  3. 11 Jul '11 23:08
    Thanks greenpawn. I've gone over what you've posted three times today, I'm sure I'll look over it some more!
  4. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    12 Jul '11 00:47
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    On another thread people were asking about playing
    e5 or c5 in the King's Indian.

    I replied the 'rule of thuimb' is to watch where the c1 Bishop goes.
    If it goes to to g5 then c5 is the centre buster.

    Rd3 of the Scottish saw Bg5 and Black hitting the centre with c5.
    White walks into an opening trap.

    R.Kynoch - H.Olsen

    [pgn]

    1. d4 Nf6 2 ...[text shortened]... k he leads
    in our OTB encounters over the years. (it may be level...I can recall 3 losses.)
    This has been the way I play the KID- particulary the Averbakh variation, and also against the Saemisch after I read GM Joe Gallagher's book on the Saemisch King's Indian.

    I have always had a certain "Which came first, the chicken or the egg" thought about it, in that there are two ideas:

    1. White plays Bg5 to "xray" the black queen and pin the knight, and thus influence black to abandon ...e5 in favor of ...c5: or

    2. Black plays ...c5 to exploit the white bishop's abandonment of the queenside by pressuring d4 (with no bishop on e3 to reinforce it), and to free up the g7 bishop to pressure b2, which is weaker.

    My guess is that if you are writing a "White to play and win" book, you will go with the first statement, but if you are writing a "Black to play and win" book, you'll go with the second!