Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. Standard member chessisvanity
    THE BISHOP GOD
    22 Aug '07 18:09 / 1 edit
    I have a book..."Endgame Challenge" by john hall...

    (not nunns endgame challenge)

    in this book are endgame diagrams much like a regular tactics workbook but here there is no explanation or ideas explained...

    anyone think this is good or bad approach to endgames?
    The positions are not the "mate with two bishops.....etc etc....its more of the "opposition" type of positions...

    your opinion on this type of endgame diagram training would be nice.
  2. 22 Aug '07 18:56
    You already have the book... My thought is, "It caint hoit". Probably not the best way of learning endgame theory, but probably a good way to practice endgame tactics.

    BTW, for what it's worth, John Watson liked the idea of the book.

    http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_reviews_jw/jw_endgame_challenge_hall.html
  3. 22 Aug '07 22:42
    I like the idea. How many times have you played a game and had a master standing over your shoulder telling you that you have win or there’s a way to draw or whatever? Probably never, so the idea sounds OK. I think authors of tactical exercises should do the same thing. Slip in a few positions where there are no combinations or anything.
  4. 22 Aug '07 23:12
    Originally posted by masscat
    I think authors of tactical exercises should do the same thing. Slip in a few positions where there are no combinations or anything.
    Dan Heisman actually did that in the last chapter of his tactics book. It's a short chapter, only 15 problems, but when you look at a diagram in that chapter, there may or may not be a winning tactic.