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  1. 01 Sep '11 15:30 / 2 edits
    If I have a chess hero,it's Euwe.
    Been a while since I last saw some Euwe games,so I pulled an old book of the shelf.
    The very first game is already a forgotten treasure,brilliant and humorous.
    It's also not very well-known,I think.The 19 year old Euwe acts as sparring partner in a trainingmatch against Réti.
    After three losses Euwe punches back.Watch how he treats one of the founding fathers of the hypermodern school.
    Take your board and sit behind the white pieces.You're in for a treat.

    Euwe-Réti,Amsterdam 1920


    Variation 1


    Variation 2


    Variation 3


    Variation 4
  2. 01 Sep '11 18:31
    great post! thanks for the variations to play out online. the game was totally above my head, but the varaitions at least allow me now to see it in the distance...
  3. 01 Sep '11 18:40
    Originally posted by torten
    If I have a chess hero,it's Euwe.
    Been a while since I last saw some Euwe games,so I pulled an old book of the shelf.
    The very first game is already a forgotten treasure,brilliant and humorous.
    It's also not very well-known,I think.The 19 year old Euwe acts as sparring partner in a trainingmatch against Réti.
    After three losses Euwe punches back.Watch how ...[text shortened]... } 27. Bd6 Qf7 28. Re7+
    Nxe7 29. Rd7+ Ka8 30. Nxb6# {How pretty is that!?}[/pgn]
    Euwe huh? Liked the game. I actually beat Euwe once... at least sort of. I was playing guess the move in a game where he played Botvinik and I guessed all the moves except for a move order blurp where Botty played Re1 then Rc1 and I decided on Rc1 then Re1. It isn't very amazing since Euwe was old and didn't play very well in that game... I'll see if I can find it though.
  4. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    01 Sep '11 19:55
    Great post. I loved the position after 15 Rfe1 ... typical Reti position with everything attacking blacks centre from the wings. You would put money on Reti being white!
  5. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    01 Sep '11 23:00 / 1 edit
    Euwe was the Bobby Jones of chess. A credit to the game.
  6. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    02 Sep '11 12:03
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Great post. I loved the position after 15 Rfe1 ... typical Reti position with everything attacking blacks centre from the wings. You would put money on Reti being white!
    I thought exactly the same thing, even though my first direct experience with Reti was through his games in the King's Gambit before he made his own pathway in chess!
  7. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    02 Sep '11 13:03
    I worked in Thailand on microwave communications for a couple of years and I bought a two book set on chess by Euwe, Static and Dynamic chess. It was slow going, now I know why, because it was before algebraic notation but I waded through that book and I know it helped my understanding of the game.

    I would like to redo that series but with an algebraic version. I heard someone redid it in that notation.
  8. 02 Sep '11 13:24
    A strange coincidence in the Reti - Euwe match.
    We have just seen Euwe beat Reti's Queen with a two Rooks

    In two previous games from this match Reti played the double Rook sac twice.
    (That is saccing 4 Rooks) and won two superb games.

    Then came the above game.
    Euwe decided not to take Reti on in theorectical debates hence the 1.e4 c6 2.b3 opening.

    After this match and possibly influenced by the play of Euwe in this game.
    Reti changed his style. Four years later in New York 1924 he beat Capablanca
    with the stem game of the 'Hyper-moderns'.

    So you could say Euwe (along with Reti, Breyer, Tartakower and of course Nimzovitch)
    took chess in a new direction.

    You will see that Reti was a master tactician first, and hypermodern later.
    Some try to skip the master tactician bit and try to play like Reti without
    ever really understadning why they keep getting beat.

    They fall for two move tricks and miss the chance to go tactical when
    it favours them.

    The first double Rook sac is quite brilliant and well worth understanding.
    It was responsible for throwing Euwe's 9th move (Nxd4) into the opening theory dustbin.



    The second and we see Reti playing a Staunton Gambit.

  9. 02 Sep '11 14:08
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    A strange coincidence in the Reti - Euwe match.
    We have just seen Euwe beat Reti's Queen with a two Rooks

    In two previous games from this match Reti played the double Rook sac twice.
    (That is saccing 4 Rooks) and won two superb games.

    Then came the above game.
    Euwe decided not to take Reti on in theorectical debates hence the 1.e4 c6 2.b3 openin ...[text shortened]... gned here. One finish is.} 17... Kf7 18. Ng5+ Kg8 19. Ne7+ Kf8 20. Ng8+ Kxg8 21. Qc4+[/pgn]
    I was wondering about that game being of influence to Réti and thus help start the whole hypermodern school of thought.We'll never know but it's a nice thought.

    Cool additional info too.Didn't know any of that,my book's not about the match.
    No time now to look at the games you presented.But I'll be back
  10. 12 Sep '11 16:20
    Here's another instructive game by the great doctor.
    Fourth game in the match Euwe-Maroczy,Bad Aussee 1921 (6-6).
    In this game Euwe punishes Maroczy's lack of development.
    It's a good example of 'ignoring threats',an important concept imo.
    Whenever your opponent threatens something your first thought should be 'can I ignore it?'.Sticking to this very simple rule will enable you to find many nice tricks and win beautiful games.
    The notes are Euwe's.I'll show the things that never happened.



    Variation 1


    Variation 2


    Variation 3
  11. 12 Sep '11 17:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I would like to redo that series but with an algebraic version. I heard someone redid it in that notation.
    Yes, you're correct.