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  1. 10 Apr '14 07:06 / 2 edits
    Here is a game I played on chess.com. I have written annotations so that you can see my thoughts and hopefully give me some useful advice.

  2. 10 Apr '14 11:17
    Joined today. You are a very fast learner to be able to post an annotated game here.
  3. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    10 Apr '14 13:03
    Whites play is very indecisive. How many moves does that Kings knight make? I don't think it achieved anything with any of those moves..
  4. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    10 Apr '14 15:17
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    Joined today. You are a very fast learner to be able to post an annotated game here.
    I posted this in Thread 158633. Something told me it would be useful in other threads.
    I love posts like this. People make such a big stink about past accounts, as if they mattered. I also like the 'shrewd detective' tone that leads to the painfully obvious conclusion.
  5. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    10 Apr '14 15:25 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by iChopWoodForFree
    Here is a game I played on chess.com. I have written annotations so that you can see my thoughts and hopefully give me some useful advice.

    [pgn][Event "Bill216 vs. elonater"]
    [Site "Chess.com"]
    [Date "2014.04.09"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Bill216"]
    [Black "elonater"]
    [Result "*"]
    [WhiteElo "1531"]
    [BlackElo "1449"]
    [ECO "?"]

    1. c3 c5 2. d ...[text shortened]... n the resulting endgame.}
    35. fxe5 fxe5 36. Qxe5 Re8 37. Qf4+ Kg7 38. Qg3 Re5 39. Qxe5+ [/pgn]
    25...g6? and ...h5 is wrong. Look at what a headache your weakened Kingside became. Before that, you were cruising with a protected passed pawn (endgame insurance) on a5 and a great outpost for N's on d4, while white had that weak P on d3 to worry about - forever.

    Play your advantages with control; i.e., don't give the opponent counterplay. Be patient; slowly improve your position without giving him anything to hope for. (This is a lesson I need to learn also.)

    The Bishop can't even go to e6 unless black removes all defense from the square.

    Edit: and if you must move a Kside pawn, make it 24...h6! See? No hole on e6 then.
  6. 10 Apr '14 19:21
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    Joined today. You are a very fast learner to be able to post an annotated game here.
    On the contrary, Most chess websites have the option to post a PGN and I have used chessbase to make my annotations for quite some time. I have also known how to copy and paste since I was a child.
  7. 10 Apr '14 19:32 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    25...g6? and ...h5 is wrong. Look at what a headache your weakened Kingside became. Before that, you were cruising with a protected passed pawn (endgame insurance) on a5 and a great outpost for N's on d4, while white had that weak P on d3 to worry about - forever.

    Play your advantages with control; i.e., don't give the opponent counterplay. Be patient ...[text shortened]... he square.

    Edit: and if you must move a Kside pawn, make it 24...h6! See? No hole on e6 then.
    I had to play ...f6 to protect my e pawn.

    Maybe my wording was unclear but I wasn't afraid of white moving his bishop to e6, I wanted to move my knight there without him having the opportunity to trade it.

    I will take your advice into consideration, however I had thought about the possible weakness of the kingside during the game but that is the problem any time you gain space, if it isn't maintained it becomes weak squares, but isn't the weakness not very easy to target because of the closed center? Even so, it wasn't really a headache, his queen maneuver was just an easily defended threat.

    I know where my decisive mistakes were, even the ones white failed to capitalize on. My main concern is what should I have been aiming for coming out of the opening? I played ...d4 early on and I don't think that is correct along with my ...a5 move but these types of moves were results of not having any knowledge of the structure I was dealing with.

    If I were playing a better player, he would have played for f4 when I have no idea what I should be playing for, maybe the prevention of f4? but then I am just defending and relying on a mistake by white to win the game.
  8. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    11 Apr '14 01:07
    Originally posted by iChopWoodForFree
    Here is a game I played on chess.com. I have written annotations so that you can see my thoughts and hopefully give me some useful advice.

    [pgn][Event "Bill216 vs. elonater"]
    [Site "Chess.com"]
    [Date "2014.04.09"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Bill216"]
    [Black "elonater"]
    [Result "*"]
    [WhiteElo "1531"]
    [BlackElo "1449"]
    [ECO "?"]

    1. c3 c5 2. d ...[text shortened]... n the resulting endgame.}
    35. fxe5 fxe5 36. Qxe5 Re8 37. Qf4+ Kg7 38. Qg3 Re5 39. Qxe5+ [/pgn]
    Give up chess, start charging for wood chopping. You'll be much happier.
  9. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    11 Apr '14 05:12
    Originally posted by iChopWoodForFree
    I had to play ...f6 to protect my e pawn.
    Protect it from what? Nothing was attacking it.

    And asking people for advice, followed by telling them, "thanks, but I already know where my mistakes are" is strange behavior. Perhaps you don't really want to know where your mistakes were.

    It's easy to focus on the tactical part of the game, later on, where you see you had a better defensive move, and call that the 'mistake'. But why put yourself in a situation where you must find precise moves just to preserve your advantage at best, and avoid losing at worst?
  10. 11 Apr '14 06:36 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    Protect it from what? Nothing was attacking it.

    And asking people for advice, followed by telling them, "thanks, but I already know where my mistakes are" is strange behavior. Perhaps you don't really want to know where your mistakes were.

    It's easy to focus on the tactical part of the game, later on, where you see you had a better defensive move, ...[text shortened]... you must find precise moves just to preserve your advantage at best, and avoid losing at worst?
    The problem is you just say it's wrong and tell me my kingside was weakened and that it became a headache. Since it wasn't a headache and whites main threat against my kingside was easily defended I don't see how it is true since you don't explain anything. I'm not learning from such comments and since I analyze my own games to figure out my errors, the errors that change the tide of battle are fairly obvious in hindsight. Especially when one drops a pawn and then a rook like I did, I know what I should have done instead.

    Maybe if you can explain to me specifically why g6 - h5 was bad in this position and what my plan should have been instead, I would be more receptive to your advice.

    I'm not trying to pick a fight with you, I'm just more interested with what I should have done earlier in the game

    "Protect it from what? Nothing was attacking it."

    After 24...h6 25.Nf3 Re8 26.Qb2 I am forced to play 26...f6 after which white can maneuver his knight to f5 via h4 when my kingside really becomes a headache.

    "It's easy to focus on the tactical part of the game, later on, where you see you had a better defensive move, and call that the 'mistake'. But why put yourself in a situation where you must find precise moves just to preserve your advantage at best, and avoid losing at worst?"

    I didn't do that here. I didn't need to make precise moves, I simply blundered because my concentration was broken by my friends who were purposefully trying to get me to mess up so we could leave.

    I mean 34...Kf7 would cause me to scratch my head if I had seen someone else do it. On the other hand, 34...exf4 followed by ...Nf7-e5 is a fairly obvious maneuver and doesn't take precise calculation.
  11. 11 Apr '14 07:10 / 1 edit


    Vs




    I think not moving the pawns in front of the king is dogmatic. It is not always to one's detriment
  12. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    11 Apr '14 16:00
    Originally posted by iChopWoodForFree
    The problem is you just say it's wrong and tell me my kingside was weakened and that it became a headache. Since it wasn't a headache and whites main threat against my kingside was easily defended I don't see how it is true since you don't explain anything. I'm not learning from such comments and since I analyze my own games to figure out my errors, ...[text shortened]... ...exf4 followed by ...Nf7-e5 is a fairly obvious maneuver and doesn't take precise calculation.
    Sounds like you've got it all figured out. Keep doing what you're doing - I'm sure you'll get great results. 🙄
  13. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    12 Apr '14 04:10
    Originally posted by iChopWoodForFree
    [fen] 8/6k1/5pp1/7p/8/8/8/6K1[/fen]

    Vs


    [fen]6k1/5pp1/7p/8/8/8/8/6K1[/fen]

    I think not moving the pawns in front of the king is dogmatic. It is not always to one's detriment
    Win for black 😕
  14. 22 Apr '14 16:03
    I'm white, where did I go wrong here? That endgame looked drawish to me at first (maybe it wasn't?), but somehow I suddenly found myself in a lost position. That was followed by a classic RHP ending, as GP probably would say.

  15. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    22 Apr '14 18:01
    Originally posted by Fanakick
    I'm white, where did I go wrong here? That endgame looked drawish to me at first (maybe it wasn't?), but somehow I suddenly found myself in a lost position. That was followed by a classic RHP ending, as GP probably would say.

    [pgn][Event "Open invite"] [Site "http://www.redhotpawn.com"] [Date "2014.02.26"] [EndDate "2014.04.22"] [Round "?"] [White "Fanak ...[text shortened]... fxg4 63. Ke3f2 Ke6e5 64. Kf2g3 Ke5f5 65. Kg3f2 Kf5f4 66. Kf2g2 g3 67. Kg2h3 Kf4f3 1/2-1/2[/pgn]
    OK. First things first.

    When you are down a pawn in a Rook endgame, with the pawns all on the same side, NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER NEVER trade the Rooks. With Rooks, those positions are almost always drawn. With Kings, there are winning chances for the stronger side.

    2nd, in the opening, your e-pawn was never weak. It had the f-pawn to support it if needed. And Black had no chance of attacking it more times than you could defend it.

    In the Sicilian, white likes to have a pawn on f4 to enable e4-e5 or f4-f5 advances. That is one way to proceed.

    Your move, c4, is typical of a Maroczy bind, trying to stop black from playing a freeing d6-d5 advance. It's not a pointless move at all. You're trying to slowly suffocate black. (You don't need black to have weaknesses for that type of strategy.)