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  1. 22 Mar '09 21:42
    I wonder what was the greatest game ever played?
  2. 22 Mar '09 22:01
    Originally posted by Chandradi
    I wonder what was the greatest game ever played?
    different aspects appeal to different people.
  3. 22 Mar '09 22:43
    The Most Instructive is considered Morphy v The Allies in Paris 1858.
    it's certainly the most re-printed game of chess.

    The game I enjoy showing is Capablanca v Fonaroff 1918.

    It is very easy to explain the moves leading up the critical position.
    You can walk a student through this game move by move as you can
    with the Morphy game.

    Capa's 11 Qc3 hitting c7 vacating d4 so the Knight can hop from
    d4 onto f5 is very instructive.

    Then we reach here. Move 17, White to play.



    The Sacrifice 17.Rxd6 looks obvious but Black has an amazing resource
    with 18....Rd1. Capa must have have seen it and yet looked deeper.
    Most players would have stopped when they saw 18....Rd1.

    We are then treated to a beautiful and classic finish.



    A wonderful game, and it has a wonderful history.
    Again we turn to Mr Winter who takes over from here.

    http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/capablancafonaroff.html2409489334
  4. 23 Mar '09 01:43 / 1 edit
    Forgot to add that if you are using this game to teach a student then
    take time out to show the Tarrasch Trap.

    Here Fonarov played 7....exd4 instead of 7...0-0



    Because of the Tarrasch Trap given below.
    The trap stops 11 moves later with 18.c4 and White wins the exchange.

    Remember to add it was between Tarrasch - Marco, Dresden 1892
    and that Tarrasch published the whole trap in a chess magazine about
    4 months prior to the game being played.
    (Marco resigned on move 17).

    After showing the trap(s)-(you also have to show the trap working
    with 10...Rfxd8) . You then move onto the main event and give
    the Capa game.

    In a later lesson, covering the dangers of relaxing in a won position,
    you can return to this trap and show what happened to a lad in a class
    I was teaching when I paired them up to go over what they had
    been shown. He managed to lose this as White!

    Here is the game. Tarrasch - Marco finished 1-0 on move 17 but we
    continue with 'Smith - Jones' which finished 0-1 on move 23.

  5. 02 Apr '09 14:29
    Yes
  6. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    02 Apr '09 17:13
    Topalov - Anand, Sofia 2005
  7. Standard member peacedog
    Highlander
    02 Apr '09 19:59
    I’m surprised no one has answered your question about the greatest game between Kasparov and Karpov. Personally I don’t know so I will continue the trend in this thread by giving what I feel is the greatest game of all time. Game 5880174
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Gonzalo de Córdoba
    04 Apr '09 06:57 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    The game I enjoy showing is Capablanca v Fonaroff 1918.

    It is very easy to explain the moves leading up the critical position.
    You can walk a student through this game move by move as you can
    with the Morphy game.
    Wow. That is a beautiful game. Everything is so logical, but the combinations are so deep...this is where you have to be able to see several moves ahead, and that's hard.

    EDIT Those numbers at the end of your address should be erased.