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  1. 31 Mar '06 06:59
    Based on the games of the strongest players, (2500+) what is considered the best way to fight the Najdorf? Maybe someone can run some Chessbase statistics?
  2. 31 Mar '06 08:06 / 2 edits
    Please stop lecturing me on what to study and just answer my question. You have no idea how much time I spent on openings, tactics, strategy or the endgame. The opening is probably about 30% of the time I spent on studying chess.

    Despite the greater importance of the other areas of chess, a good understanding of the opening is key to success. After all, knowing an opening well will give you important strategic insight, a familiar middle game and an idea of roughly how well you would do in the endgame as well as how to handle it. It is by no means to be ignored, even for 1600 players.

    But in any case, I I'm probably closer to 1700 than 1600. This rating is provisional and based on my performance on FICS, USCL, ICC, Playchess.com, etc., I think it is not representative.

    Anyway, back to the question, what line has worked best for you against the Najdotf? (For me it has been 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ so far.)
  3. 31 Mar '06 08:16
    Where did you find this Kasparov quote? I find it hard to believe that he would say that openings are insignificant to a 1900+, Class A player.
  4. 31 Mar '06 08:22 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by JoniG
    It does not matter if you still miss 3-5 move semi-proffesssional combinations.
    True, but because you reach familiar positions from an opening you know well; that is less likely to happen.

    Anyway, let's just get back to the question...
  5. 31 Mar '06 08:31
    after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6...
    3.d4 is by far most common while 3.c3 is far less common but statistically slightly better

    3.Bb5+ is more common than 3.c3 but is statistically worse. It is less common than 3.d4 and is statistically worse. If you want numbers let me know...
  6. 31 Mar '06 08:45
    Originally posted by o0obruceleeo0o
    after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6...
    3.d4 is by far most common while 3.c3 is far less common but statistically slightly better

    3.Bb5+ is more common than 3.c3 but is statistically worse. It is less common than 3.d4 and is statistically worse. If you want numbers let me know...
    Thanks, but which database did you use?

    BTW: The question is in the first post. What lines after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 are best for white?
  7. 31 Mar '06 09:00
    I used Chessbase 9
  8. 31 Mar '06 10:09
    Thank you.
  9. 31 Mar '06 11:11
    Originally posted by exigentsky
    Anyway, back to the question, what line has worked best for you against the Najdotf? (For me it has been 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ so far.)
    At what point did your line become a Najdorf? You're line is more of a general Sicilian than a specific Najdorf.

    You also ask about database stats from GM games, but I don't think this will suggest a good approach for yourself. For example, do you use GM stats to choose all your openings? I guess not; I'm sure you've found your own preferences. What works for a fulltime GM may not work well for you.

    Why not study some Sicilian games and see what appeals and make sense to you?
  10. 31 Mar '06 11:19 / 1 edit
    Your right, it would work against many Sicilian defenses, but I use it to quell Najdorf intentions. Thus it is my line against the Najdorf and many other possible Sicilian variations. I like it because it seems to often take Black out of his comfort zone.

    For me, the best way to beat the Najdorf is to avoid it entirely.
  11. Subscriber no1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    31 Mar '06 11:46
    Originally posted by exigentsky
    Your right, it would work against many Sicilian defenses, but I use it to quell Najdorf intentions. Thus it is my line against the Najdorf and many other possible Sicilian variations. I like it because it seems to often take Black out of his comfort zone.

    For me, the best way to beat the Najdorf is to avoid it entirely.
    Why start a thread about "beating the Najdorf" when you want to talk about the Moscow variation?

    The four most used lines against the Najdorf proper depend on where White plays a Bishop on turn 6. They are: Bg5 (the "main" and probably most aggressive line), Be3 (which will often transpose into the English Attack against the Scheveningen), Bc4 (Fischer's old favorite) and Be2 (the most positional treatment). f3 is becoming more popular though it often leads into the English Attack and a3 is a "flavor of the month".
  12. 31 Mar '06 12:10
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Why start a thread about "beating the Najdorf" when you want to talk about the Moscow variation?
    Good point, however the Moscow variation is an effective way of avoiding the Najdorf.
  13. 31 Mar '06 12:38 / 2 edits
    Careful with stats, though. When I'm checking out stuff like this I alway make sure I check when the lines were played, the relative ratings of the players, whether they were blitz games, etc. Don't accept that c3 is a better move than d4 just because it performs better. More likely it just leads to an unclear position where your knowledge fo the latest lines isn't so important and you have to rely on actual chess playing!
    I'm not one of these people who think opening study is useless, though, as long as you learn the plans and not just the variations. Reading through annotated opening guides can be very useful, why should reading through whole annotated games be considered some of the best training you can do and reading through annotated openings not be so?
  14. 31 Mar '06 12:52
    After
    1. e4 c5
    2. Nf3 d6
    3. d4 cxd4
    4. Nxd4 Nf6
    5. Nc3 a6

    My Chessbase big database 2006 (pruned to only contain games by players rated >2400) gives the following stats...

    Bc1-a3 2717 games 55%
    Bf1-e2 2372 games 52%
    Bc1-g5 1624 games 53%
    f2-f4 1100 games 52%
    Bf1-c4 922 games 50%
    f2-f3 523 games 56%

    there are a few more lines including g2-g3, a2-a4, Qd1-f3 which have fewer than 500 games played. Personally I find Bc1-g5 works well.
  15. 31 Mar '06 16:18
    hmm looks like I typed the first one wrong. That should be Bc1-e3 not Bc1-a3...