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  1. 11 Sep '12 18:03
    Im playing first the first time in an over the board tourney (never had one OTB game) . Ive played some 30 minute games on ICC AND won 4 out of 7 (low rated players, like me), someone told me chess.com is better with more frequent friendly tourneys. I'm trying to play a few games a day so I don't
    completely make a fool of my self. Rather than defend and being ground down with tactical play I'm not equipped to handle is it worth going down in a blaze of glory , do tourney players expect ridculously aggressive play.
  2. 11 Sep '12 18:17
    Originally posted by kaminsky
    Im playing first the first time in an over the board tourney (never had one OTB game) . Ive played some 30 minute games on ICC AND won 4 out of 7 (low rated players, like me), someone told me chess.com is better with more frequent friendly tourneys. I'm trying to play a few games a day so I don't
    completely make a fool of my self. Rather than defend and ...[text shortened]... worth going down in a blaze of glory , do tourney players expect ridculously aggressive play.
    I would recommend to keep playing on ICC if you're playing in roughly even 30min games there.

    As for the types of players there will be a wide range.. some boring old guys with passive systems and some gambiteering nuts.. . .so I don't see how they would be expecting aggression as it varies.

    If youre not equipped to handle tactical play I would focus most of your remaining time on going through as many tactical problems as you can.. try a few 30min games to work on your clock control.
  3. Standard member hedonist
    peacedog's keeper
    11 Sep '12 23:03
    Originally posted by kaminsky
    Im playing first the first time in an over the board tourney (never had one OTB game) . Ive played some 30 minute games on ICC AND won 4 out of 7 (low rated players, like me), someone told me chess.com is better with more frequent friendly tourneys. I'm trying to play a few games a day so I don't
    completely make a fool of my self. Rather than defend and ...[text shortened]... worth going down in a blaze of glory , do tourney players expect ridculously aggressive play.
    I would say the most important thing for an internet player to do before his first OTT tourney is to get used to playing with a real board. So any games played over the net you should play the moves out on the physical board. I for one find my board vision is affected by playing on a 2d screen.
  4. 12 Sep '12 01:17
    Originally posted by hedonist
    I would say the most important thing for an internet player to do before his first OTT tourney is to get used to playing with a real board. So any games played over the net you should play the moves out on the physical board. I for one find my board vision is affected by playing on a 2d screen.
    this is very true. I was going to say to do all the tactics on a real board but forgot.

    not only was it hard for me performance-wise to switch to 3d, but it took a while to build up my stamina too. I can play behind a computer or read a 2d book but somehow the scanning a real board would give me headaches and I would hang pieces.
  5. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    12 Sep '12 01:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by maxlange
    this is very true. I was going to say to do all the tactics on a real board but forgot.

    not only was it hard for me performance-wise to switch to 3d, but it took a while to build up my stamina too. I can play behind a computer or read a 2d book but somehow the scanning a real board would give me headaches and I would hang pieces.
    I'm glad you and hedonist posted on this. I have spent more time with 2D chess and less with 3D when studying this last year, and I think it has adversely affected my OTB performance.

    I did not want to make too much of it because I thought it sounded like I was trying to make an excuse to myself, but I see that I may not be alone on this.

    I think I am going to spend less time on my laptop and go back to using my kitchen table more often!
  6. 12 Sep '12 02:02
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    I'm glad you and hedonist posted on this. I have spent more time with 2D chess and less with 3D when studying this last year, and I think it has adversely affected my OTB performance.

    I did not want to make too much of it because I thought it sounded like I was trying to make an excuse to myself, but I see that I may not be alone on this.

    I think I am going to spend less time on my laptop and go back to using my kitchen table more often!
    I am trying to do the entire "Chess" (by Laszlo Polgar) on my real board. .. just to improve those easy 2 movers and such.

    Eventually I want to work out all my corr. games on a real board but I need to cut the load first.
  7. 12 Sep '12 04:37
    It's all moves completed in 90 minutes plus 3 second increments per move , roughly how long is a game. I was going to play in the same tourney last year but didn't win a game over the net in normal time and gave it a pass , I was suprised how nervous I got , for some reason thats gone so I thought I'd give it go. How hard is 5 games over 3 days .
  8. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    12 Sep '12 09:20
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    I'm glad you and hedonist posted on this. I have spent more time with 2D chess and less with 3D when studying this last year, and I think it has adversely affected my OTB performance.

    I did not want to make too much of it because I thought it sounded like I was trying to make an excuse to myself, but I see that I may not be alone on this.

    I think I am going to spend less time on my laptop and go back to using my kitchen table more often!
    I have noticed the same thing. It seems easier for me to see tactical situations on the 2D boards in a book or on the internet than on a real board when playing OTB. And some of the young kids that I am playing that play this speed chess all the time are good at setting tactical traps for me to fall into OTB. Of course ,one of them is the middle school state champion and his older brother is the high school state champion.
  9. 12 Sep '12 13:31
    "It's all moves completed in 90 minutes plus 3 second increments per move "

    Try and get some OTB blitz in to get you used to pressing your clock after
    each move. (it must be pressed with the same hand you moved the piece with.)
    Keep a score.
    Write his move down, move, press clock, write down your move.
    On net chess the computer does this for you. Even recodring the moves.

    Try to get this reflex training in as soon as possible.

    First game Forget the clock. (after the first game you will be OK.)
    Do not become fascinated with the clock. forget it.
    You have 3 hours for each game. (you are allowed to think on his time.)

    Enjoy yourself and Good Luck.
  10. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    12 Sep '12 15:17 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    "It's all moves completed in 90 minutes plus 3 second increments per move "

    Try and get some OTB blitz in to get you used to pressing your clock after
    each move. (it must be pressed with the same hand you moved the piece with.)
    Keep a score.
    Write his move down, move, press clock, write down your move.
    On net chess the computer does this for you. ...[text shortened]... hours for each game. (you are allowed to think on his time.)

    Enjoy yourself and Good Luck.
    Thinking on my opponents time is another problem I have. I get bored during my opponents time and have the tendency to look and see what other players are playing. I rather be able to see the position I am thinking about before wasting my old brain power on imaginary positions. I get tired too easily now days.
  11. 13 Sep '12 04:44
    Thx everyone , I have very little knowledge of openings but I'm going to try to learn the Dainish and Smith Morra and try them on ICC , looks like they open the board up .
  12. 13 Sep '12 09:18
    Otb is fun. Just enjoy it. It is only a game anyway, and the same game you have been playing on the internet. Maybe get your set out beforehand and play through a couple of annotated games for reasons already discussed. The boards at tourneys are usually quite big so make sure you look at the whole thing, not just the corner where you are aiming (i find it quite easy to overlook long shots from bishops, for example).
  13. 13 Sep '12 09:25
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Thinking on my opponents time is another problem I have. I get bored during my opponents time and have the tendency to look and see what other players are playing. I rather be able to see the position I am thinking about before wasting my old brain power on imaginary positions. I get tired too easily now days.
    I have no OTB experience, but you can use your opponents time for other things than deep tactical calculations, like:
    - scanning for threats on both sides of the board
    - figure out which replies are possible and what it would change to the position. You can then make a rough plan for each of the expected moves
    - revise overall evaluation of the position and update long-term plans
  14. 13 Sep '12 09:36
    Also, remember to take a pen.
  15. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    13 Sep '12 15:41
    Originally posted by scubily
    Also, remember to take a pen.
    Recording the moves correctly is another problem I have with OTB Chess. It never fails that I forget to record one move and don't notice that I am recording in the wrong block until a couple moves later. Then it bothers me and I waste time on my clock trying to figure out the missing move and getting the score card straight before I continue with the game.