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  1. 15 Sep '08 14:46
    In Washington (state not DC) there is a rule called insufficient losing chances. Basically if you are low on time and do not have a delay clock, if it is CLEARLY impossible to lose the situation, then you may claim a draw. An example might be being up a Q,R vs B while your king is in the open (middle).

    Is there a rule like that in FIDE or USCF?

    Also, was it unethical for me to try and call it in a position in which I could not win, however I could NOT lose?
    (in the end, I verbally abused the judge into giving us each 5 more minutes for me to prove the pawn endgame was a deadlock draw...sigh not even coaches bother to learn endgames anymore)
  2. 15 Sep '08 14:48
    This is a USCF rule. You can find out more about it at their site.
  3. 15 Sep '08 14:56
    Originally posted by c guy1
    ... I verbally abused the judge ...
    Never a good idea to verbally abuse the judge.
    Your judge is your friend. And you want him to stay your friend. Next time he maybe judge in you favour.
  4. 15 Sep '08 14:59
    Originally posted by c guy1
    In Washington (state not DC) there is a rule called insufficient losing chances. Basically if you are low on time and do not have a delay clock, if it is CLEARLY impossible to lose the situation, then you may claim a draw. An example might be being up a Q,R vs B while your king is in the open (middle).

    Is there a rule like that in FIDE or USCF?

    Als ...[text shortened]... e the pawn endgame was a deadlock draw...sigh not even coaches bother to learn endgames anymore)
    As MrHand stated, this is a USCF rule. Rules 14H and 14I cover the ILC topic, and these two rules run about 5 pages (too long to type all the rules here verbatim.)

    The ILC rule is probably one of the most complicated rules that TDs have to deal with, and it's the reason why TDs absolutely love delay digital clocks.
  5. 15 Sep '08 15:06
    Originally posted by c guy1
    Also, was it unethical for me to try and call it in a position in which I could not win, however I could NOT lose?
    To claim ILC according to USCF rules, the time control must be sudden death, and you must have less than two minutes on your clock. Assuming you met those conditions, it wasn't unethical at all. That's the purpose of the rule. (A claim of ILC is first a draw offer.)
  6. 15 Sep '08 15:12
    Originally posted by c guy1
    (in the end, I verbally abused the judge into giving us each 5 more minutes for me to prove the pawn endgame was a deadlock draw...sigh not even coaches bother to learn endgames anymore)
    Giving each of you 5 more minutes wasn't the correct thing for the TD to do. Obviously the TD wasn't up on the ILC rules.