Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 20 Nov '12 17:19
    This is amusing and quite a brilliant idea.
    I’ve no idea who composed it.


    White to play and mate in 10.

    The number 10 will scare people off so here is the solution.
    Just enjoy the whole idea.

  2. 20 Nov '12 21:48
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    This is amusing and quite a brilliant idea.
    I’ve no idea who composed it.

    [fen] 7K/P1p1p1p1/2P1P1Pk/6pP/3p2P1/1P6/3P4/8 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    White to play and mate in 10.

    The number 10 will scare people off so here is the solution.
    Just enjoy the whole idea.

    [pgn]
    [FEN "7K/P1p1p1p1/2P1P1Pk/6pP/3p2P1/1P6/3P4/8 w - - 0 1"]

    1. a8=N {It’s easy to ...[text shortened]... nk you are getting the idea by now.} 8... gxf6 9. g7 f5 10. g8=N {Checkmate on move 10.}[/pgn]
    Good one. I would always look for a queen.
    Just goes to show it is not always the way forward.
  3. 20 Nov '12 21:53
    Thats great,thanks GP.
  4. 21 Nov '12 00:07
    i love that puzzle
  5. 21 Nov '12 00:53
    LOL.. GP Again. LOL..
  6. 21 Nov '12 06:04 / 1 edit
    It reminds me a little of the one posted in Thread 112872 by User 437199 back in 2009.
  7. 21 Nov '12 10:26
    Nah, this one is completely different
  8. 21 Nov '12 11:07
    The original composer was Donald H. Hersom (thanks to Heinzkat for that information).

    Go to this site:
    http://www.softdecc.com/pdb/search.pdb
    Enter probid='P1253143' into the search box and click on the Search button.

    Alternatively enter A='Hersom' to see some more examples of Hersom's problems.
  9. 21 Nov '12 14:08
    Hi Fat Lady.

    It's the same probem in a mirror image!

    I knew I had seen it or the idea before and thought I had stuck it on a Corner.
    It really is a lovely creation.

    I saw it recently in Learn From the Greats by Peter J. Tamburro Jr.
    published 2000, It's on page 87 where Tamburro has indeed flipped the original problem.

    He does not mention the composer but then again nor does he appear
    to take credit for creating it.
  10. 21 Nov '12 14:15 / 3 edits
    Although all of Donald Hersom's problems seem to have been published in the 1930s/40s, he was still alive in 2000:
    http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~rjcc/corn47.htm
    A magazine we mention too little in these pages is The Problemist, the organ of the British Chess Problem Society. In the current issue, Sir Jeremy Morse contributes an article on the little-known problemist D.H. Hersom, who was active in the 1930s. Sir Jeremy was reminded, when he used one of Hersom's problems in a talk last year, that nothing was known about the problemist save that he was British. The BCPS Librarian, John Beasley, discovered that he was living in Barking, East London, in 1942. The electoral roll confirmed that Donald Henry Herson was at that address in 1939. Sir Jeremy then visited the Family Records Centre, where he discovered that Herson had been born in Ilford on 11/1/1914 and married in Bath in 1947, when he was living in Bishop Aukland. He found a Mr John Herson in the Durham telephone directory, who informed Sir Jeremy, to his immense delight, that his father was alive and well and still interested in chess problems.

    In fact the wonders of Google have turned up Hersom's obituary, dated December 2006:
    http://www2.newsquest.co.uk/the_north_east/personal_announcements/deaths_archive_plain/deathsarchive20061204.html
    This also gives his full name: Donald Henry Hersom.
  11. 22 Nov '12 02:05
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    It reminds me a little of the one posted in Thread 112872 by User 437199 back in 2009.
    Who's the composer of the second problem (mate in 33) in GP's post of 18 May 2009?
  12. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    22 Nov '12 02:12
    I think it is stupid.
  13. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    22 Nov '12 02:52
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    I think it is stupid.
    Eli, Eli, Lemana Shabakthani!
  14. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    24 Nov '12 07:50
    Originally posted by Linden Lyons
    Who's the composer of the second problem (mate in 33) in GP's post of 18 May 2009?
    Now now, no naming and shaming.
  15. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    24 Nov '12 08:03
    Reminds me of something from the mind of Robert Brieger, a problem composer I knew way back when.