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  1. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    27 Nov '13 19:41 / 1 edit
    In another thread GP wondered what hidden gems might have remained buried in the 1907 WC match between Lasker and Marshall. This one is grand to play through: very tricky endgame with 2 Ns vs N and 3 passers. Marshall is white.

  2. Standard member byedidia
    Mister Why
    27 Nov '13 21:20
    Wow! Great game. Thanks for posting.
  3. 27 Nov '13 22:33 / 2 edits
    Hi Moonbus. (Blog idea ruined - Thank You) 😉

    I was going to show the Game 6 draw in a blog.
    (which as you will see would have led onto the naming of the variation
    which would have led onto something else.)

    Lasker - Marshall World Champioship 1907 (game 6)




    The Steinitz simul game that gave the opening it's name.
    I was going to add deeper notes but I am sulking because
    Moonbus nicked my blog idea....He can do the deeper notes.

    Steinitz - McCutcheon, New York Simultaneous Display 1885


  4. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    28 Nov '13 20:24
    Thanks for the notes on Lasker - Marshall. Sorry if I pre-empted your blog idea.

    As requested: Steinitz - McCutcheon, 1885, below.



    I have a request; perhaps you could pass it on to the web interface programmers: could we please have coordinates on board displays in threads? I learned British descriptive as a kid and never got really fluent at algebraic, so I stumble sometimes in these threads... Thanks.
  5. 29 Nov '13 01:45
    Not only have to knobbled an entire blog, now you have posted a game
    I have already posted. This is thread plagiarism.

    I've got my eye on you Moonbus. I may have to fill a blog with Moonbus losses.

    Speaking of plagiarism, I see GM Raymond Keene is getting dragged over the coals by Private Eye.

    http://www.ecforum.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5043&start=285
  6. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    29 Nov '13 05:22 / 2 edits
    Somebody once said that plagiarism is the sincerest form of flattery. I hope it was me.

    "I may have to fill a blog with Moonbus losses."

    Wot, both of 'em? Not much filler there, I'm afraid.
  7. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    29 Nov '13 12:36
    PS, I have now had a chance to read through the article on Keene. A wimpy copy-paster I am not! I'll have you know that I laboriously dictated Tartakower's notes into a speech recognition app. </sarcasm>
  8. 29 Nov '13 16:32
    "Wot, both of 'em? Not much filler there, I'm afraid."

    I can pad it out with games you should have lost and then games should have won.

    I have established you have that excellent book Tartakower & Du Mont's 500.
    Every library should have a copy, infact a chess library need only contain
    this one book to turn your avergae joe into a chess player.
    But you have to read it, study it, devour it....

    Game 111 Faktor - Rubinstein, the note after Black's 60th move.
    It starts 'Most instructive for the beginner - is as follows'.
    Warning you that even the most easily won looking endings hide miracles.

    The first game of yours I looked at (a draw).
    I discovered you should have lost and then should have won.

    First we look at a position in the game you should have lost.

    M Ivan - moonbus RHP 2013 Game 9834715

    White should have played 15.Bxc1 instead of 15,Qxc1 that appears to be easily winning for White.


    That is the win White missed. Same game, many moves later. The miracle I mentioned earlier.

    Black (Moonbus) to play.

    Black played 33...f5 and the game was drawn, Whte cannot get his King in.
    Black should have saved up f5 as tempo burner and the Black King gets in.


  9. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    29 Nov '13 17:00
    "The first game of yours I looked at (a draw).
    I discovered you should have lost and then should have won."

    Oh, that is by no means my most ridiculous and embarrassing game. (BTW, read my annotations for that game.)

    Game 10215769 was worse: I was playing against a player who was: a) playing an unsound opening, and b) about 300 points my junior. And I contrived to hang my queen. Good grief, Charlie Brown, it doesn't get any dumber than that!

    Sheer inattention to detail, both times.

    Tartakower & Dumont's book is great, isn't it? I have two other gems in my library: Richard Reti's Masters of the Chessboard (Dover), and Emanuel Lasker The Life of a Chess Master by J. Hannak (Andre Deutsch, 1959). There is endless joy playing over those games and reading the analyses.
  10. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    29 Nov '13 17:07
    Originally posted by moonbus
    "The first game of yours I looked at (a draw).
    I discovered you should have lost and then should have won."

    Oh, that is by no means my most ridiculous and embarrassing game. (BTW, read my annotations for that game.)

    Game 10215769 was worse: I was playing against a player who was: a) playing an unsound opening, and b) about 300 points my junior. ...[text shortened]... k (Andre Deutsch, 1959). There is endless joy playing over those games and reading the analyses.
    If you form a queen hanging club, I will be your first recruit.
  11. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    29 Nov '13 17:26 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    If you form a queen hanging club, I will be your first recruit.
    Well, I wouldn't claim to be "expert" at it, but it would be a comfort to have some company in that club.

    BTW, can anybody other than me see my published annotations, or are they visible only after I have put in the requisite number of games to get past a provisional rating?