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  1. 09 Feb '11 00:36
    anyone read this book, give a review?
  2. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    09 Feb '11 17:05
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    anyone read this book, give a review?
    I am waiting to hear myself!
  3. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    09 Feb '11 17:19
    I had the first edition pocket sized version of this. I used to look at the positions on the train to and from work. I don't think the positions are earth shattering, and some of them should be familiar i.e. Bernstein Capablanca ending etc.
  4. 09 Feb '11 21:03
    This postion is missing from the book and it's fairly important.


    Solve that and they will make you a King.
  5. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    09 Feb '11 21:16
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    This postion is missing from the book and it's fairly important.

    [fen]rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1[/fen]
    Solve that and they will make you a King.
    1.f4!


    I'll have my crown with no blood diamonds please.
  6. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    09 Feb '11 22:45
    On a related note, I copied the Bratko-Kopec Test from Kopec's book (I think it's Test, Evaluate, and Improve Your Chess but I am too lazy to go check)- it was the 24 original positions that I used.

    Seven people in my club took it, and everyone scored exactly where their ratings said they should. We chess players often cynically regard such stuff as gimmickry, but I think Kopec's stuff is the real deal.
  7. 09 Feb '11 23:28
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    On a related note, I copied the Bratko-Kopec Test from Kopec's book (I think it's Test, Evaluate, and Improve Your Chess but I am too lazy to go check)- it was the 24 original positions that I used.

    Seven people in my club took it, and everyone scored exactly where their ratings said they should. We chess players often cynically regard such stuff as gimmickry, but I think Kopec's stuff is the real deal.
    I think he studied in Scotland for a time, may even have won the Scottish championship, not really sure, GP will know. I remember when Korch used to post here, he used to have these threads entitled, evaluate this position. I think it has to be one of the most valuable exercise you can do, especially if there is no obvious captures or tactical combinations.
  8. 09 Feb '11 23:50
    Ian Mullen, me and a few others were background guinea pigs on
    some of those tests.
    I recall not reaching my expectation, later I got another bunch and
    set them up on board, which I always did ever since day one and
    exceeded my expectation!

    It was from there I started wondering about about the real benefits of
    pattern recognition on a full sized set and going to the length of obtaining
    chess sets that I knew were being used in different tournaments.
    (In the UK all the sets are supplied by one company and the sets and board
    colours green/white or brown/white differ).
    You have to learn to fight with with the weapons you will using.

    This did me in once when I hacked my way to board one in the last round
    of a tournament and boards one and two had fancy wooden Staunton sets.
    I convinced myself I was doomed playing IM Mark Orr before a pawn
    was pushed simply because of the set.
    (To be honest Mark was hot then, though I did beat him a few weeks previous
    in an allegro....which means nothing I suppose.)

    I still believe you need to study on a full sized set to emulate anything
    you want to re-produce OTB. I will always believe that.

    Agree the effort Danny Kopec puts into his work is gigantic. I've seen it first hand
    and had the great pleasure to co-write a book with him.
    A good book too. Master Chess, it went though 18 editions and 4 publishing
    houses. Not bad for a chess book.
  9. Standard member RBHILL
    Acts 13:48
    09 Feb '11 23:50
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    This postion is missing from the book and it's fairly important.

    [fen]rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1[/fen]
    Solve that and they will make you a King.
    I think it is funny. There is a student from Germany staying at my parents house and he thinks that kings should be across from queens, LOL.
  10. 10 Feb '11 07:52
    Hi Robbie,

    I really liked the book except for the tacky cover. This awful chick I used to date actually threw it out because it was 1) tacky and 2) a chess book. I agree that the positions aren't earth shattering, but think that the positions are likely the ones stronger players know cold. I do not think that they are THE 300, but they are certainly useful. Most of them are tactics and endgames which are likely what folks like us should be studying anyway.

    I cannot help but recommend another title: one of my favorite books is Alburt's "Just the Facts." It's one of the few books I've read/studied more than once.

    I don't like any of his stuff on the opening and know that his other books have some errors (some even due to copied analysis). But my main gripe is the cornball aesthetic. Alburt/Lawrence have really lame jokes and diagrams that don't put my mind in the chess mood.

    Hope that helps
  11. 10 Feb '11 08:05
    Forgot: it's expensive! I got mine used, but I think the book is just under $20!?
  12. 10 Feb '11 13:58
    Originally posted by emperor31
    Hi Robbie,

    I really liked the book except for the tacky cover. This awful chick I used to date actually threw it out because it was 1) tacky and 2) a chess book. I agree that the positions aren't earth shattering, but think that the positions are likely the ones stronger players know cold. I do not think that they are THE 300, but they are certainly ...[text shortened]... lly lame jokes and diagrams that don't put my mind in the chess mood.

    Hope that helps
    Hi emperor, yes that is great, pity your chick chucked it out, perhaps if she was more inclined to take an interest in the noble game she might have seen it differently.
  13. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    10 Feb '11 14:48
    I forgot about the cover, I tore mine off. Probably the worst cover of any chess book yet printed.
  14. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    10 Feb '11 15:09 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    I forgot about the cover, I tore mine off. Probably the worst cover of any chess book yet printed.
    is this the cover, or did it have multiple ones as gp said it went through 4 publishing houses?


    http://pixhost.info/avaxhome/2006-08-16/tapa.jpg


    I think it's pretty cool. it's so tacky and dated that it kinda has that old-bond-movie charm, looking like a cross between vintage porn and an old spice ad. I can almost smell the cigar and cognac mixed with too much aftershave. ancient artifact from a world gone forever.
  15. 10 Feb '11 15:58 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by wormwood
    is this the cover, or did it have multiple ones as gp said it went through 4 publishing houses?


    http://pixhost.info/avaxhome/2006-08-16/tapa.jpg


    I think it's pretty cool. it's so tacky and dated that it kinda has that old-bond-movie charm, looking like a cross between vintage porn and an old spice ad. I can almost smell the cigar and cognac mixed with too much aftershave. ancient artifact from a world gone forever.
    Yes thats the one, I dont know when it was printed but it looks almost very late seventies or early eighties. Like you very eloquently state, it has a certain quality about it from a bygone year, like it should be sold in a brown paper bag. The chick seems to be taking a great interest in the endgame. In the follow up, Chess Training Pocket Book II, the chick has gone and ol Lev is left to ponder the position without distraction.