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  1. 24 Jul '10 03:40 / 6 edits
    I walk into a used book store today, doing my usual "where is your chess section?"
    ..."Well we don't have one, but the games section is over there"
    To my unbelieving eyes I see a copy of "The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played" by Irving Chernev (1992 copy of the 1965 edition, Dover)

    What would possess a man/woman to sell this book? I can understand why the other chess books were there...Pandolfini's "Beginning chess" and Lasker's "How to play chess"...those I can understand being at a used book store.
    This book is a classic though, why would anyone sell it?
    Infact this copy of "The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played" is one of three that I own now, my first copy that I bought and now two copies that I rescued from the shame of a used book store.
    I got home late but I had time to go over Game 22 "Systematic Strangulation" S. Tarrasch - J. Showalter, Vienna 1898, Hungarian Defense
    A great lesson in preventing your opponent any good moves by "Prophylaxis" It reminded me to protect the base of my pawn chain to prevent my opponent from gaining counter-play when he chooses to use a cramped defense.
    I don't really have a point to my story, I just can't see how someone would sell a chess book. Does anyone really quit chess? To do this book justice I will study it cover to cover, again and again. I have recently started studying chess strategy and understanding, so I know it will help.
  2. 24 Jul '10 04:51
    Alas, it is a cruel world we live in where people do not appreciate classic chess books like you do. You have done an honorable thing by saving the book from the ignoble fate of collecting dust on a bookshelf in a used book store.
  3. 24 Jul '10 06:31
    Don't forget all of those pencil marks they put in books that I have to erase.
    Who writes in books? Where does it end?!!
  4. Standard member skeeter
    515 + 30 days
    24 Jul '10 07:51 / 1 edit
    Yes. The most insightful chess book that I have ever read, I'm actually in receipt of two editions of the '65 issue - one was gifted to me and the other I happened across in a second hand book shop in San Francisco. I paid $USD86.00 and was stoked. It was in better condition than my gifted book and - now brace yourselves - it is signed. The dedication is in Russian and roughly translates : "...to my friend Sarenev(?) - from a master to a beginner - Irving C "

    There you have it...

    skeeter
  5. 24 Jul '10 08:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by gorookyourself
    What would possess a man/woman to sell this book?

    This book is a classic though, why would anyone sell it?

    I don't really have a point to my story, I just can't see how someone would sell a chess book.
    You have absolutely no imagination at all. 😛

    1. Chess person died and spouse sold chess book collection.

    2. Person upgraded from paperback to hardcover, sold paperback.

    3. Person has photographic memory and no longer needs book after reading it.

    4. Person comes to his senses and realizes that chess is a complete waste of time here on Earth. 😉

    5. Person had to move and has less shelf space than before move.

    6. The book was gifted to him, he doesn't play chess and has no desire to start.

    7. Person bought the book to impress others with his intelligence, then realizes that it would label him as a chess nerd.

    8. Person bought 3 copies and wonders why he did it, then sells the 2 duplicates. 🙂

    9. Person didn't realize until after purchase that book was in descriptive notation and can't comprehend the old notation or doesn't want to bother learning it.
  6. 24 Jul '10 09:02
    Originally posted by gorookyourself
    Don't forget all of those pencil marks they put in books that I have to erase.
    Who writes in books? Where does it end?!!
    I think greenpawn writes in chess books. But I'm sure he'll deny it. 😉

    (Actually, I think in one of his Cornered articles, he mentions writing in chess book margins. But this is from memory, I could be wrong. )

    More importantly, who uses chess books as "bathroom readers? 😲
  7. 24 Jul '10 10:22 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    You have absolutely no imagination at all. 😛

    1. Chess person died and spouse sold chess book collection.

    2. Person upgraded from paperback to hardcover, sold paperback.

    3. Person has photographic memory and no longer needs book after reading it.

    4. Person comes to his senses and realizes that chess is a complete waste of time here on Earth. ; iptive notation and can't comprehend the old notation or doesn't want to bother learning it.
    10. Person bought Chernev's Most Instructive Games and actually got so good that he now only reads Dvoretsky and other insanely difficult books - Sells Chernev's book.

    11. Person bought Chernev's book, realized that it was way over his head, realizes that he instead needs Pandolfini's Beginning Chess book, sells Chernev's book.

    12. Person has chess book collecting disease and periodically has to enter rehab, selling off most of his books.

    13. Person never really liked reading books, convinces himself that internet bullet and blitz and tactics practice is all he needs now.

    OK, that's a baker's dozen, I think I got it out of my system now.
  8. 24 Jul '10 11:03
    14. person got so involved with chess it cost him his job and family,had to sell the book to pay for his next liquid meal.

    A chess player's life is no bed of roses

    toet.
  9. 24 Jul '10 11:19 / 1 edit
    Hi

    My books are scribbled on all over the place , pencil, ink, crayon.

    My Estrin book on the Two Knights is covered with busts, ideas and traps
    written on nearly every page.

    Sometimes I highlight the analysis in yellow/pink to make it clearer
    to see just before I play through it.

    Nothing is sacred. My Fischer's 60 is treated just as any other book I own

    http://www.chessedinburgh.co.uk/chandlerarticle.php?ChandID=256

    Just after halfway down the Fischer article you will see a photo-copy
    of a page.

    I big red X any analysis that I think is not needed at that moment
    or is just plain crap.

    Well I use to, I don't study nowhere near as much as I did in the past.
    Then the analysis was human and you were looking for holes.

    Now it's computer guff, correct and pointless to play through.
    You know it's right and there will no inspired fantasy line to enjoy.

    They are my books. I paid for them, I'll do what I want with them.

    In my experience charity shop chess books come from dead players or
    are unwanted Christmas/Birthday presents.
    10 or 11 charity shops give me a call when anything to do with chess arrives.

    The new ones I pick up come from a book reviewer/ correction proof reader
    who sells a load of books in one book shop every few months.
    (I get a call from the shop when new stuff arrives).

    I've tried to find out who he is but the shop owner will not reveal his source
    because he knows I will go around to his house and buy them.
  10. 24 Jul '10 13:09
    15. Original owner ws dyxlesic thought he was buying a book on
    Interesting Cheese Gnomes.

    Dumped it off at nearest charity shop.
  11. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    24 Jul '10 14:26
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    You have absolutely no imagination at all. 😛

    1. Chess person died and spouse sold chess book collection.

    2. Person upgraded from paperback to hardcover, sold paperback.

    3. Person has photographic memory and no longer needs book after reading it.

    4. Person comes to his senses and realizes that chess is a complete waste of time here on Earth. ; ...[text shortened]... iptive notation and can't comprehend the old notation or doesn't want to bother learning it.
    I live in Florida, and the first thing I thought of was #1.
  12. 24 Jul '10 16:47
    8. Person bought 3 copies and wonders why he did it, then sells the 2 duplicates. 🙂
    Hahaa I like that one. 😉
  13. 24 Jul '10 16:48
    Originally posted by skeeter
    Yes. The most insightful chess book that I have ever read, I'm actually in receipt of two editions of the '65 issue - one was gifted to me and the other I happened across in a second hand book shop in San Francisco. I paid $USD86.00 and was stoked. It was in better condition than my gifted book and - now brace yourselves - it is signed. The dedication is in ...[text shortened]... nd Sarenev(?) - from a master to a beginner - Irving C "

    There you have it...

    skeeter
    Would you sell it?
  14. Standard member skeeter
    515 + 30 days
    24 Jul '10 22:27
    Originally posted by gorookyourself
    Would you sell it?
    Sorry, no. I'm reluctant to part with them and besides I have no idea of their value.

    skeets
  15. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 Jul '10 23:22
    Originally posted by skeeter
    Sorry, no. I'm reluctant to part with them and besides I have no idea of their value.

    skeets
    Well you know the value of at least that one. $86 bucks.