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  1. 14 Oct '10 01:49
    I just had to share my joy at finding out that David Lawson's "Paul Morphy: The Pride and Sorrow of Chess" is back in print (new edition). The book is the definitive biography of Morphy's life. No games to speak of (I think there are a couple that were in letters), but a nice biography. (I read it a few years back, but the book was a loaner that had to be returned.)

    I don't know if any content has changed from the first edition. I do know that the editor, Thomas Aiello, has added an editor's introduction which gives some personal information on the author (Lawson).

    Alas, it's only in paperback, but at least the price is right. Twenty bucks retail, less through discounted channels, for a nearly 400 page book printed on acid-free paper. It's from a small publisher, the UL Press (University of Louisiana at Lafayette).

    The hardcover first edition has long been out of print, and it typically sold for over 100 US dollars on eBay and other used book stores. I could never quite justify biting at those lofty prices, so I'm thrilled that I can now get a copy for a mere pittance.
  2. 14 Oct '10 02:13
    Rec'd because it's been ten years since I've seen a copy of that book!
  3. 16 Oct '10 05:53
    I might check this out. Chess personalities are always interesting... especially the ones who went mad.

    I read Mortal Games: The Turbulent Genius of Garry Kasparov by Fred Waitzkin at the library over a period of about a week. Even though it was pretty poorly written, it was enjoyable enough to finish...

    I was thinking of ordering William Steinitz, Chess Champion: A Biography of the Bohemian Caesar through inter-library loan too. I know next to nothing about the 1st World Champion... Anyone read it?

    http://www.amazon.com/William-Steinitz-Chess-Champion-Biography/dp/0786428465/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1287207942&sr=8-1
  4. 16 Oct '10 09:05
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    I just had to share my joy at finding out that David Lawson's "Paul Morphy: The Pride and Sorrow of Chess" is back in print (new edition). The book is the definitive biography of Morphy's life. No games to speak of (I think there are a couple that were in letters), but a nice biography. (I read it a few years back, but the book was a loaner that had to be r ...[text shortened]... g at those lofty prices, so I'm thrilled that I can now get a copy for a mere pittance.
    About a year ago, I bought ' Morphy's games of chess' by Philip W Sergeant. It's published by Dover Publications Inc, New York. (1957 edition)

    It has 300 of the masters games, including odds and blindfold games, all annotated, some by Loewenthal, but mainly by Sergeant.

    There is also an in-depth biography charting his travels around Europe, playing the best around, including Harrwitz, with the score; W5 L2 D1 in favour of the genius that was Morphy. Of course, he never got to play Staunton, as the latter was so scared of losing he made numerous excuses to avoid the inevitable.

    The book is a great read and if you can find a copy, I highly reccommend you buy it .
  5. 16 Oct '10 11:39
    I have had the Sergeant book for years. An old friend.

    You will get some people defending Staunton for ducking Morphy.
    True his time was taken up with writng about chess and his
    research for his mammoth work on Shakespear was about the same time.

    http://www.cambridge.org/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9781108000055

    So a match was perhaps out of the question.

    But there is no excuse for him declining the off hand games which Morphy
    ask him to play when they often met in Simpsons.
  6. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    16 Oct '10 13:11 / 1 edit
    I have a copy of Lawson's book - I guess the reprint will ruin it's value. So I am not quite so happy about this. Oh well.
  7. 16 Oct '10 13:22 / 1 edit
    I just ordered it from the US via amazon.com. £14 inc p&p.