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  1. 26 Feb '08 13:48
    What do you do when you've no plan ? Or rather when the "brilliant" plan you had has been shot to bits by your opponent ? I know you you are all gonna say find a new plan quick but I'd love to hear how you react. So come on, what do YOU do ?
  2. 26 Feb '08 13:53
    Originally posted by ManualEngine
    What do you do when you've no plan ? Or rather when the "brilliant" plan you had has been shot to bits by your opponent ? I know you you are all gonna say find a new plan quick but I'd love to hear how you react. So come on, what do YOU do ?
    With no plan: try to improve the position of my worst placed piece.
    Plan scuppered: 2 tasks 1. try and counter the opponent's plan 2. figure out where I went wrong with the original plan
  3. 26 Feb '08 14:15
    with no plan check the tactics...think how to create a tactical mess and check again and again the tactics...usually in highly tactical positions a plan can become useless...
  4. 26 Feb '08 14:19
    Originally posted by vipiu
    with no plan check the tactics...think how to create a tactical mess and check again and again the tactics...usually in highly tactical positions a plan can become useless...
    Look at your position:
    Find your weak spots and strengthen them.
    Develope some piece to a better place.

    Look at your opponents position:
    Find his weak spots and attack them.
    Think of what he doesn't want you to do, and do it.
    Flip the board and you'll see from his view.
  5. 26 Feb '08 14:53
    The important thing, and this is something which took me years to realise, is that you really do need to have a plan. If you can't think of one, keep trying until you do. Don't just play aimlessly for a few moves in the hope that a usable plan will come floating by at some stage, this is a sure fire way to lose a game.
  6. 26 Feb '08 15:01 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ManualEngine
    What do you do when you've no plan ? Or rather when the "brilliant" plan you had has been shot to bits by your opponent ? I know you you are all gonna say find a new plan quick but I'd love to hear how you react. So come on, what do YOU do ?
    Are there any open files that a rook can seize? Or files that may potentially open? Is there a good outpost for a knight or bishop? Can you push any of your opponents pieces back or stifle their mobility by denying them outposts in your territory? What about a pawn storm? Can you exchange any pieces? What would the board look like after an exchange? Will your opponent be left with an isolated pawn? Will he have doubled pawns? Will his pawn be drawn away from the centre? Will it open a file? Will you have a king or queenside pawn majority? Will the exchange give your opponent more or fewer pawn islands? Imagine the board without the pieces - would you win the endgame? Are any of my pieces undeveloped? Are there better squares for my developed pieces? Has my opponent castled? How could I prevent him castling? Can I develop a piece with a gain of tempo?

    If all else fails you could always push a pawn.
  7. 26 Feb '08 15:05
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    The important thing, and this is something which took me years to realise, is that you really do need to have a plan. If you can't think of one, keep trying until you do. Don't just play aimlessly for a few moves in the hope that a usable plan will come floating by at some stage, this is a sure fire way to lose a game.
    But do you have any hints to help formulate a plan?
  8. 26 Feb '08 15:19
    Originally posted by Mahout
    But do you have any hints to help formulate a plan?
    Not really. I guess it just comes from experience. I'm not a big fan of "general principals" type of plans, e.g. putting rooks on open files, finding outposts for knights, improve the position of your worst piece.

    My plans seem to be more on the lines of "if I swap off all the pieces I've got a better ending" or "he's going to win material on the queenside in a few moves so I'd better attack his king wildly". If I do go for more short term goals they tend to be trying to get rid of weaknesses I've given myself earlier in the game, e.g. I may try to swap off weak pawns, drive away knights I've allowed onto good squares. Things I wouldn't have allowed in the first place if I'd had better chess vision earlier on.
  9. 26 Feb '08 15:52
    Originally posted by ManualEngine
    What do you do when you've no plan ? Or rather when the "brilliant" plan you had has been shot to bits by your opponent ? I know you you are all gonna say find a new plan quick but I'd love to hear how you react. So come on, what do YOU do ?
    Hey, thanks everyone. So much to think about. I might just push a pawn. No seriously, I love to hear other peoples thoughts. Thats why I love the game and this site.
  10. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    26 Feb '08 19:48
    I take a break and come back to the position until I find a plan. there always are multiple plans, and the inability to find them usually comes from being tired.

    the same applies to plans you can't quite seem to get working. a little time off, and suddenly it hits you how to make it work. or, that it's absolutely not workable.

    give your subconscious a little time to chew on the problem. sleep on it. there always is a plan.
  11. 26 Feb '08 19:58
    Originally posted by ManualEngine
    What do you do when you've no plan ? Or rather when the "brilliant" plan you had has been shot to bits by your opponent ? I know you you are all gonna say find a new plan quick but I'd love to hear how you react. So come on, what do YOU do ?
    When in doubt, advance a pawn. How wrong can you go?
  12. Standard member buffalobill
    Major Bone
    26 Feb '08 20:23
    Originally posted by Kiwi kid
    When in doubt, advance a pawn. How wrong can you go?
    Very. Every move must have a purpose.
    In the absence of anything obvious, work for space. In your case, gaining control of the centre, or placing your pieces in better forward positions. In his case, cutting down his spatial options - like a pawn to prevent his knight coming forward. It doesn't have to be a grand plan, just build little advantages, like working to give him a bad bishop ( that IS a plan!). In doing so, be patient - the cracks will appear when he's under pressure.
  13. 26 Feb '08 22:02
    I thought this was going to be about Ed Stelmach... (a joke for the Albertans... if there are any)
  14. Standard member Talisman
    Time traveller.
    26 Feb '08 22:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ManualEngine
    What do you do when you've no plan ? Or rather when the "brilliant" plan you had has been shot to bits by your opponent ? I know you you are all gonna say find a new plan quick but I'd love to hear how you react. So come on, what do YOU do ?
    Plans, position play, strategy call it what you will but the one thing to remember is that this element of the game is the froth on the beer, the icing on the cake! Master play is all about shades of position. For players below that level i think it far better to look at the game from a tactical view point.
    Only when you've scoped out all forcing moves ie: checks, captures, threats, jump captures and jump checks for a good forcing line should you begin to worry about plans. So says the great PURDY!
  15. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    26 Feb '08 22:55
    Originally posted by Talisman
    ... So says the great PURDY!
    oh yeah? well what has he done for me lately?


    all kidding aside, there's really no excuse for NOT dealing with all the tactical cheapos in correspondence chess on every single move, so you'll inevitably end up working with plans.

    if you don't, you're doing something wrong.