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  1. e4
    Joined
    06 May '08
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    28734
    29 May '19 22:50
    Hi Eladar,

    He never mentioned you, it could have been aimed at those who spoke
    on a game he thought might still be in progress. I'd let it go. It was harmless.
  2. Joined
    12 Jul '08
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    13011
    29 May '19 22:55
    @greenpawn34

    I am not the one who keeps bringing it back up.i just respond to those who do.
  3. SubscriberPaul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    The Stacks
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    102861
    29 May '19 23:362 edits
    @eladar said
    @Paul-Leggett

    As I pointed out, if he believe I might be cheating he could ask instead of jumping to false claims.

    I wrote in the present tense because I want to know what I could do for future games.
    He did not jump to false claims, nor accuse you of cheating.

    All he said was "I hope this is not from a current game". There is no claim there, nor is there any mention of cheating. You just read more into it. The first aggressive post was from you.

    You just need to be more careful about what you write. I think if you hit the "quote" button in your responses, you might be better able to match your response to the original post. What you claim he said is just wrong.
  4. Joined
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    13011
    30 May '19 00:04
    @Paul-Leggett

    Why the angry face?
  5. Joined
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    13011
    30 May '19 00:05
    @ketchuplover said
    I hope this is not from a current game 😠
    Why the face? Simple, accusation.
  6. SubscriberPaul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
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    30 May '19 09:20
    @Eladar

    You've made your mind up, so there is no point anymore. Good luck going forward.
  7. Joined
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    30 May '19 14:40
    @Paul-Leggett

    It is a non issue. I am not the one who keeps bringing it back up.
  8. Subscriberketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    Wisconsin USA
    Joined
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    57316
    31 May '19 14:54
    @ketchuplover said
    I hope this is not from a current game 😠
    The implication of cheating is unintended. Sincere apologies for that appearance. The angry face should've been left off until cheating was proven. Sorry for that too.
    Hopefully all who peruse this topic will learn something. I will choose my words more carefully going forward.
  9. Joined
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    13011
    31 May '19 15:53
    @ketchuplover

    I am a bit thin skinned when losing. In a better mood I would have swallowed the perceived accusation and reacted differently. I apologize for my shortcoming and flying off the stick.
  10. Joined
    12 Jul '08
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    13011
    31 May '19 18:27
    Here is the greater truth in chess, once I understand how to use that position, I will win enough games to where I will be playing people who will not let me achieve it.
  11. Subscribermoonbus
    Uber-Nerd
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    01 Jun '19 19:32
    @Eladar

    Several players in the 1900-2100 range have weighed in here with several suggestions: h3, Rf1d1, Ra1c1, Ne5, Nf4. As Paul remarked, "White is spoiled for choice in a position like this."

    As Ragwort noted, in the actual game, you did play three of the suggested moves, but by the time you played them they were no longer good moves because the board position had changed by then.

    Rather than concentrating on specific moves, I would like to expand on something else Ragwort mentioned: "Years ago trees of analysis and formalized 10-point thinking routines were all the rage. This … gives an insight into what might be going on in a good player's head when they analyze." Ragwort did not mention the points in the routine, so I will mention some of them now.

    semi-permanent considerations:
    1. material advantage
    2. bad king position
    3. passed pawns in the middlegame
    4. opponent's weak pawns
    5. strong vs. weak squares
    6. pawn islands
    7. strong pawn center
    8. control of diagonal(s)
    9. control of file(s)
    10. control of rank(s)
    11. bishop pair

    ephemeral considerations:
    12. bad piece position
    13. bad piece coordination
    14. advanced development / retarded development
    15. centralization / consolidation
    16. control of more space

    These are called strategic elements, or sometimes Steinitz's elements (he did not invent them, but implemented them systematically and published annotated games based on these considerations or elements). The order in which the elements are listed is not indicative of their importance, however they are not of equal importance. The order of importance will shift during the course of a game.

    A solid grasp of these elements is essential to get over the 1800 barrier in chess. These elements explain why the moves suggested above were suggested, why they seemed "obvious" to the players who suggested them. Once one has a grasp of these strategic elements, candidate moves suggest themselves, offer themselves as "obvious", as follows:

    h3 retards the opponent's development (item 14.);
    Rf1d1 supports the center and consolidates (items 7. and 15.);
    Ra1c1 controls a file and retards the natural freeing move for Black c7-c5 (items 9. and 14.);
    Ne5 controls space deep in the opponent's territory (item 16.) but has the potential disadvantage of under-protecting the d4 pawn (item 7. minus);
    Nf4 same as Ne5.

    It will be seen that one move may fulfil more than one element, or fulfil one but weaken or violate another, simultaneously. Recognizing when one consideration is more important than others, in a given position, is what makes the difference between a strong player and a very strong player. Recognizing when the fulfilment of one at the cost of violating another is a good risk or a poor risk is what makes chess interesting (as Mark Twain said, "difference of opinion is what makes horse races." ) Recognizing how to make one consideration more important than another is what makes the difference between the champion and the also-rans.

    I have recommended a book to you before; I still recommend it: Chess Strategy for Club Players, by Herman Grooten, ISBN 978-90-5691-268-0. Grooten explains the above elements theoretically (I copied the list directly from his book), and demonstrates each element practically in sample master games. If you are serious about improving, consider this your homework assignment.

    One final word of wisdom, from S. Tartakower: "Chess is a struggle against one's own errors."
  12. Joined
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    01 Jun '19 19:342 edits
    @moonbus

    I own that book.

    And I know I have gotten some very good advice as well as anyone near my level of understanding. Thanks for all the advice, really much more than I expected.

    Really much more to think through as you organized the info.
  13. Subscribermoonbus
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    01 Jun '19 19:37
    @eladar said
    @moonbus

    I own that book.

    And I know I have gotten some very good advice as well as anyone near my level of understanding. Thanks for all the advice, really much more than I expected.
    I delve into that book again and again, and learn something more each time.
  14. Joined
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    02 Jun '19 02:19
    At the moment I am finding if I play with the right intent I do better. When I lose I find it is necause I am trying to force something that is not there without thought of wjat my opponent is doing.

    Failure to look beyond a 4 square by 4 square region of the board hurts too.

    So just play smart, look at the board, castle and exploiting weaknesses my opponent leaves. That is my best atm. Hopefully after spending some time in that book I will know how to improve my position.
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