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  1. 01 Jan '06 00:04
    Guys,

    I have not yet stumble across this problem but I think I will in the future, it has been bothering me at the back of my head.

    If I practice 24/7 on all aspects of chess, in a book, on tactical problems of all sorts, improve my pattern recognition, practice games over the internet, and when it all comes down to the end of the day, I just know chess on diagrams! What I mean is, I know what tactical move to play when I see a diagram, but if its real life, a real tournament for example, its not a diagram anymore, its a real chessboard. Surely my pattern recognition or whatever I have learn from chess diagrams will no longer be that useful. I might just be a 1800 instead of a 2000 that I was on computers!

    So saying this, is there anyway I should be practicing? Should I recreate every single tactical problem I come across in the book on a real chessboard (this way I would be masters of both)? Should I continue learning on diagrams and worry about that later?

    Thanks.
  2. Standard member Saint Nick
    Pimp of the elves
    01 Jan '06 00:28 / 1 edit
    Well, I think that if you improve via books then you will improve on a board as well. Even though your eye see two different things, the way your mind "sees" the board is the same. It would definately be a good idea to set up the diagrams on a board and look at them that way so you stay in the practice of looking at a board as well, but I don't think it would really be possible to be an 1800 on a board and a 2000 on paper.
    The best suggestion I can give is to continue to play OTB while studying and playing online- that way you get used to looking at both and you can try out what you are studying during OTB play.

    I'm not Nigel Short disclaimer: I'm not a GM and don't pretend to be one. Everything above is just my opinion and is subject to being wrong or complete garbage.
  3. 01 Jan '06 01:36
    I practise tactics of books, and online webpages etc.. and I play on here, blitz computer and then Otb. You'll see the tactics in OTB if they are there, trust me. Just keep doing what your doing. And play OTB game also if you can. That helps the most. You might play better on a computer compared to on an actual board or the opposite because the eye sees things differently but you'll get used to it eventually.
  4. 01 Jan '06 22:21
    I HAVE stumbled across this problem. When I was first introduced to online chess, I had trouble making out the 2-dimensional board, after a lifetime of playing nothing but OTB chess. I had to have a board setup for each game I was playing -- otherwise, I couldn't seem to "see" the 2-D representation. Then I finally got used to it, and pretty much stopped with real boards altogether.

    Then, after a couple months of this, when I played some OTB games, I felt disoriented. I got so used to the 2-D boards, that I just couldn't seem to make out the real thing in 3-D! So now, whenever I play a live-action, online game, I have a board setup and transfer each move from online to the actual board, make my move there, and then transfer my move online. This uses up valuable playing time and complicates the whole process, but at least this way I won't lose either my 2-D or 3-D vision.
  5. Standard member Wulebgr
    Angler
    01 Jan '06 22:29
    There can be transfer issues with small numbers, but you're talking about 24/7. I've played something over 20,000 games online since 1998--most 3 minute, but several hundred correspondence--and I certainly see tactics in 3D tactile situations the same way I do on 2D screens and books.
  6. 03 Jan '06 19:23
    Originally posted by Saint Nick
    Well, I think that if you improve via books then you will improve on a board as well. Even though your eye see two different things, the way your mind "sees" the board is the same. It would definately be a good idea to set up the diagrams on a board and look at them that way so you stay in the practice of looking at a board as well, but I don't think it w ...[text shortened]... ne. Everything above is just my opinion and is subject to being wrong or complete garbage.
    But, I know you can certainly be a 1700 player OTB and a 1500 player on RHP because that's happened to me. But, it's probably because I play quick chess mostly on here and rarely think more than a minute a move at the most. As far as diagrams, if you can solve tactical puzzles on paper, then you can solve them over the board. Even if the position is different, the idea behind the combination might be the same. Learn principles and ideas, not specific board setups, because some of them may never appear again in your lifetime. That's what Lev Alburt says in his course. I love that course! One only needs to look at the exponents of chess to realize the sheer infinite possibilities of the game.
  7. Standard member Ravello
    The Rude©
    03 Jan '06 20:30
    Originally posted by powershaker
    But, I know you can certainly be a 1700 player OTB and a 1500 player on RHP because that's happened to me.But, it's probably because I play quick chess mostly on here and rarely think more than a minute a move at the most.
    Oh my.............still going on with this crap?
    I bet that while here you think a minute about your moves in OTB chess you take half a hour to move uh?
  8. 04 Jan '06 17:39
    GM Jonathan Tisdall stated he did not reach Grandmaster strength until he practiced playing over games from books and magazines in his head. Doing so improved his ability to calculate at the board.

    Also, in doing tactical problems in books, you KNOW what to look for because the book tells you there's a mate in three, etc. No such help is available in a tmt. game, so you have to look for the signposts that tell you there MAY be a combination. C.J.S. Purdy advised looking for undefended pieces, pins, forks, pieces w/restricted mobility, all checks.

    If you see any of those, then look for a combination. Usually there won't be one, but if there is, you're more likely to find it.
  9. Standard member Ringtailhunter
    Track drifter ®
    04 Jan '06 18:23
    Originally posted by stanloh
    Guys,

    I have not yet stumble across this problem but I think I will in the future, it has been bothering me at the back of my head.

    If I practice 24/7 on all aspects of chess, in a book, on tactical problems of all sorts, improve my pattern recognition, practice games over the internet, and when it all comes down to the end of the day, I just know ches ...[text shortened]... masters of both)? Should I continue learning on diagrams and worry about that later?

    Thanks.
    Practice makes perfect. I play OTB much better and more often than I do online or against engine programs. When you get in a chess club play as many games as you can and study the common openings. I find in my club that they are pretty standard. If you stick to your openings you will be fine with a player who does not know the openings...even when it is really screwy
    When I play a game against an opponent on this site that I have to win I will set up the pieces on a board and study the positions as if I were playing OTB. I don't do this as often as I should as my rating reflects it perfectly.

    But to answer your question if you don't play OTB or in tournaments OTB any answer you get here will not matter much will it?

    RTh
  10. 04 Jan '06 21:25
    The thing is, I plan to play both.
  11. 04 Jan '06 22:04
    Online you face weird openings but at a club with decent playes its usually common openings and if your okay with that, you'll have a great game. I also play better OTB then anywhere else comparing ratings but I'm catching up to my OTB rating on here.

    Otb will help you tons and is way more funner.