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  1. 03 Feb '13 00:25
    I cannot understand what's going on in this game, especially Polgar's eleventh move. Could someone annotate the game? Or at least explain that particular move?

  2. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    03 Feb '13 00:39 / 3 edits
    Just offhand, if black captures the knight with his queen, white has

    1) A discovered attack on the queen when the knight on d2 moves, although I haven't figured out a particular tactic yet; and

    2) White also can follow up with 12. f4, followed by a potential f5. She will pry open the center with black's king still in it.

    Generally, I think Polgar was trading a piece for time and intiative to take advantage of black's king being in the center.

    I'm just guessing- I need to look at this more!

    EDIT- The 11th move was discovered by GM Zaitsev and played by Karpov against Korchnoi in 1978. If black takes the knight, white plays Qf3, hitting the knight on c6.
  3. Standard member vivify
    rain
    03 Feb '13 02:00
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett


    EDIT- The 11th move was discovered by GM Zaitsev and played by Karpov against Korchnoi in 1978. If black takes the knight, white plays Qf3, hitting the knight on c6.
    But couldn't black just play Bd7?
  4. 03 Feb '13 02:27
    Well, then surely Qxf7+, but I don't know what next.
  5. 03 Feb '13 03:18 / 1 edit
    I can't get to my chess books now, but this looks like a move revived in the 95 Kasporov-Anand Match. It had been played earlier by Tal, I believe, but then it sort of vanished. Kasparov revived it to produce a nice win over Anand, if I remember correctly.

    Yes, here is one of the games:



    The 11th move is just a complicated opening line that Polgar memorized. It's easy to not even consider it if you haven't seen it before. I'll try to get to my books later and produce a little analysis.
  6. 03 Feb '13 03:38 / 3 edits
    Karpov Korchnoi 1978. I remember it so well.
    Then I was devouring everything on chess. I ran my own chess magazine.
    (usually made up with the same stuff I put in the blog. Traps, tricks and blunders.)

    I had joined three chess clubs so I could play in 3 club championships
    thus allowing me to play more mid week games.
    I refer to this as my chess with cornflakes period.
    I really did wake up, stagger to a board and eat my breakfast whilst playing
    over a game of chess.

    I recognised the move 11.Ng5 right away and was dismayed that Paul spotted it.
    I want to be first.
    I looked at the Keene book covering the match just to get the exact
    game no's and analysis but it all came flooding back.

    Karpov - Korchnoi 1978.
    This was the famous Yoghurt match. Karpov was leading 5-2 and it's all over.
    (The match was first to six wins ) Suddenly Korchnoi wins games 28,29 and 31.
    It's 5-5.
    Next game Korchnoi plays a Pirc. He had surprised Karpov with it in game 18.
    Karpov was waiting for him. 1-0 Karpov wins 6-5.

    The move 11.Ng5 according to Keene came from Tal and was acclaimed as the TN
    of the century.

    Korchnoi looked at it for 45 minutes before rejecting the piece sac and playing
    11...dxc6. Which Anand played v Kasparov. One line Korchnoi saw OTB was...



    In the actual game after Korchnoi declined the sac Karpov went badly astray
    and Korchnoi outplayed him but blundered in the final hour and a draw was agreed.

    We follow one line of Keene's if Black does not take the Knight.

  7. 03 Feb '13 04:47
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Karpov Korchnoi 1978. I remember it so well.
    Then I was devouring everything on chess. I ran my own chess magazine.
    (usually made up with the same stuff I put in the blog. Traps, tricks and blunders.)

    I had joined three chess clubs so I could play in 3 club championships
    thus allowing me to play more mid week games.
    I refer to this as my chess ...[text shortened]... Qe6+ mates.next move.} 22... Nxe5 23. Re1 Qxc5 24. Qe6+ Kd8 25. Nf7+ Nxf7 26. Qe8[/pgn]
    Great Post ... All I new was the Tal part and the Kasparov-Anand Match. There is always someone who's knowledge goes a littler further than your very own.

    Thanks for posting, Greenpawn!

    It looks like I don't need to make a run for the books now. Cheers
  8. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    03 Feb '13 05:27
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Karpov Korchnoi 1978. I remember it so well.
    Then I was devouring everything on chess. I ran my own chess magazine.
    (usually made up with the same stuff I put in the blog. Traps, tricks and blunders.)

    I had joined three chess clubs so I could play in 3 club championships
    thus allowing me to play more mid week games.
    I refer to this as my chess ...[text shortened]... Qe6+ mates.next move.} 22... Nxe5 23. Re1 Qxc5 24. Qe6+ Kd8 25. Nf7+ Nxf7 26. Qe8[/pgn]
    That was a complicated game. Enough to give me a headache.
  9. 03 Feb '13 17:33 / 3 edits
    (deleted nonsense)

    Thanks for the explanations!