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  1. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    06 Oct '12 22:22 / 1 edit
    F. Gamage, 1937

    #2
  2. 06 Oct '12 22:51
    I worked this one out really quickly. It seemed obvious.
  3. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    06 Oct '12 23:12
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    I worked this one out really quickly. It seemed obvious.
    Yeah, that is even easy for me.
    Qxd5
  4. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    07 Oct '12 01:51 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    Yeah, that is even easy for me.
    [hidden][/hidden]
    1...Rxc5
  5. 07 Oct '12 08:21 / 1 edit
    The key is good, and the play involving the bBd5 is excellent. However, almost all of the variations with the bBd4 are duals, i.e. after most moves by this bishop, white has a choice of mates, which is untidy. Ideally, white would meet each black defence with a unique mating move.
  6. 07 Oct '12 12:10
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    I worked this one out really quickly. It seemed obvious.
    Then you are much much better at these than me. I've just lost an hour to it, and I think I have got it now, but in this example there are so many pieces that can move it is taking a while to check each avenue
    Bb4?
  7. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    07 Oct '12 12:14
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    [hidden]1...Rxc5[/hidden]
    2.Qxd4#
  8. 07 Oct '12 12:25 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by morgski
    Then you are much much better at these than me.
    Your answer is the same as I got.

    I'm not a big fan of puzzles, but the ones that SwissGambit posts are always excellent. I approach them by looking at which escape squares need covering, and in this one it took me a few seconds to decide that d2 was the key square.

    I'm playing the British under 18 Champion tomorrow in a league match, hopefully doing a few of these puzzles will help me if he walks into an obscure mate-in-two position.
  9. 07 Oct '12 12:28 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    [hidden]2.Qxd4#[/hidden]
    2. ... Rxh5. Taking the king trumps checkmate.
  10. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    07 Oct '12 12:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    [hidden]1...Rxc5[/hidden]
    On 2nd thought
    Qxc5
  11. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    07 Oct '12 13:09
    NO. I got it now.

    1.Qxd5 Rxc5 2.Nxc5+ Kc3 3.Qxd4#
  12. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    07 Oct '12 13:52
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    NO. I got it now.

    [hidden]1.Qxd5 Rxc5 2.Nxc5+ Kc3 3.Qxd4#[/hidden]
    2 moves. Not 3.
  13. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    07 Oct '12 13:57
    Back in 1937, this problem was good enough for a First Prize. The key was supposed to be shocking, because it exposed wK to discovered checks, but the Rh3/Nf3 battery can counter a few of them, so maybe it's not so hard to solve.
  14. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    07 Oct '12 14:32
    Originally posted by SwissGambit
    Back in 1937, this problem was good enough for a First Prize. The key was supposed to be shocking, because it exposed wK to discovered checks, but the Rh3/Nf3 battery can counter a few of them, so maybe it's not so hard to solve.
    It is not so hard. I had a mate in two lined up for everything but the Rxc5 move and that only required one more move. I'll settle for that in a game of chess anyday.
  15. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    07 Oct '12 15:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by RJHinds
    It is not so hard. I had a mate in two lined up for everything but the Rxc5 move and that only required one more move. I'll settle for that in a game of chess anyday.
    In a game of chess, that would be good enough, but the standards are more stringent for solving. One move over the stipulation is a FAIL.