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  1. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    28 Feb '08 12:24 / 1 edit
    I'm curious if anyone has had good results with moving their rook soon after castling into a fianchettoed kingside in order to save their dark-squared bishop from the exchange after Bh6 with ...Bh8.

    For example, here's a blitz game I played recently:

    [Event "RHP Blitz rated"]
    [Site "www.playtheimmortalgame.com"]
    [White "tonyemmett"]
    [Black "wittywonka"]
    [Result "0-1"]

    1. c4 c5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 Nc6 4. Nf3 g6 5. O-O Bg7
    6. d3 O-O 7. Bf4 d6 8. Qd2 Re8 9. Bh6 Bh8 10. Nc3 Bg4
    11. Re1 Qd7 12. Nd5 Nxd5 13. cxd5 Nb4 14. e4 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 Na6
    16. Rab1 Nc7 17. Qe2 Nb5 18. Bg4 Qc7 19. f4 Nd4 20. Qf2 Nf5
    21. Qf3 Nxh6 0-1

    Position After 9. ... Bh8



    In my blitz game, keeping my bishop seemed to help, helping me find the tactic that would have won the game, but I can also see how ignoring the exchange would allow for two extra tempi, which could also be put to good use.

    Any thoughts?
  2. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    28 Feb '08 13:19
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    I'm curious if anyone has had good results with moving their rook soon after castling into a fianchettoed kingside in order to save their dark-squared bishop from the exchange after Bh6 with ...Bh8.

    For example, here's a blitz game I played recently:

    [Event "RHP Blitz rated"]
    [Site "www.playtheimmortalgame.com"]
    [White "tonyemmett"]
    [Black "wit ...[text shortened]... uld allow for two extra tempi, which could also be put to good use.

    Any thoughts?
    On move 11 whick rook moved to e1?

    Concerning the question I usually let the other guy exchange bishops and take with the king. My rationale is the following: Yes, my light/dark squared around the king are weakned but his light/dark square bishop is out too.
  3. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    28 Feb '08 13:24 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    On move 11 whick rook moved to e1?

    Concerning the question I usually let the other guy exchange bishops and take with the king. My rationale is the following: Yes, my light/dark squared around the king are weakned but his light/dark square bishop is out too.
    The correct notation should have been 11. Rfe1. Thanks for pointing that out.

    Again, I see the reasoning there, too, in that both bishops are taken off the board, but the fianchettoed bishop has the potential to be stronger than the non-fianchettoed bishop, and I've often found that the exchange can be particularly costly in the case of pawn storms further weakening my kingside (Sicilians), although this is hardly ever the case in the Symmetrical English.
  4. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    28 Feb '08 13:32
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    The correct notation should have been 11. Rfe1. Thanks for pointing that out.

    Again, I see the reasoning there, too, in that both bishops are taken off the board, but the fianchettoed bishop has the potential to be stronger than the non-fianchettoed bishop, and I've often found that the exchange can be particularly costly in the case of pawn storms fu ...[text shortened]... ning my kingside (Sicilians), although this is hardly ever the case in the Symmetrical English.
    I think that the shor answer is it depends on the position. If you see that pawn storms are likely or any other stuff can further harm your kingside shelter then don't exchange but if don't exchange.
  5. 28 Feb '08 13:45 / 1 edit
    It may be obvious, but just in case - it's usually wrong for the player with the fianchettoed bishop to take their opponent's bishop as that would allow their queen to get in a very dangerous position. If you decide not to avoid the capture then allowing your opponent to take you and then recapturing with the king is usually best. The king then guards the weakened squares on f6/h6 (or f3/h3).

    Having said that, I managed to lose my queen in a recent county game after my opponent played Bxh6, f6, g5, Kh8, Ng8. Maybe I should have complained that he had five moves in a row, but I didn't think of it at the time.
  6. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    28 Feb '08 13:48 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    It may be obvious, but just in case - it's usually wrong for the player with the fianchettoed bishop to take their opponent's bishop as that would allow their queen to get in a very dangerous position. If you decide not to avoid the capture then allowing your opponent to take you and then recapturing with the king is usually best. The king then guards the w ...[text shortened]... should have complained that he had five moves in a row, but I didn't think of it at the time.
    Indeed.

    Game 4508226

  7. 28 Feb '08 13:54
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    Indeed.

    Game 4508226

    Nice game and illustrates the point perfectly. If you don't mind I will show it the children I teach as an example of what can happen if you let your opponent's queen stay too close to your king.
  8. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    28 Feb '08 13:56 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    Nice game and illustrates the point perfectly. If you don't mind I will show it the children I teach as an example of what can happen if you let your opponent's queen stay too close to your king.
    I'd be thrilled, thanks! I enjoyed the game, and the rook tactic there in particular.
  9. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    28 Feb '08 14:11
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    I'd be thrilled, thanks! I enjoyed the game, and the rook tactic there in particular.
    Very nice! Took me a while to see why it worked.