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  1. 12 May '05 19:23
    "i will now describe the rules of src: they r they same as regular chess except some of the moves are now illegal, but the rules are too complex for for me to explain...the precise rules are far too numerous for me to list here etc. etc. etc." (it seems that many a persons fear of explaining src proceeds their fear of death itself!)
    Why is it that every website on stanley random chess has this same bs??? none of them explain the rules. can someone tell me the rules or give me a link where i can get the rules?
  2. Standard member ark13
    Enola Straight
    12 May '05 20:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bobbob1056th
    "i will now describe the rules of src: they r they same as regular chess except some of the moves are now illegal, but the rules are too complex for for me to explain...the precise rules are far too numerous for me to list here etc. e ...[text shortened]... one tell me the rules or give me a link where i can get the rules?
    I found the same thing when doing the same search a few weeks ago. It's incredibly stupid. To be honest, I don't really think SRC exists at all. It's just an inside joke made up by Bowmann and his associates to impress people. But there really are no rules.
  3. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    12 May '05 21:19 / 2 edits
    The rules are indeed too numerous to post. As I've said before, at the last count the official handbook for Stanley Random (SR) chess consisted of 175 volumes, which have to be transported to tournaments by articulated lorry. It's often best for a beginner to learn by watching a game played by experts.

    And you are wrong to say that 'some of the moves are now illegal'. It is important to remember that Stanley Random (SR) chess predates regular chess, and offers greater complexity and creativity. The following may help:


    Legal Moves

    Unlike Simplified SR (Common) Chess, the sequence and patterns of possible moves are strictly regulated by a carefully articulated body of laws, so that SR Chess has a lesser number of legal moves (approximately half). Maxwell's "Bipolar Law of Corresponding Necessities" might benefit the novice:

    First Thereom of Permissible Play: "A legal move in Simplified SR (Common) Chess is not by necessity legal in SR Chess, but a legal move in SR Chess is by necessity legal in Simplified SR (Common) Chess."

    First Reversed Theorem of Permissible Play: "An illegal move in Simplified SR (Common) Chess is by necessity illegal in SR Chess, but an illegal move in SR Chess is not by necessity illegal in Simplified SR (Common) Chess."

    The awesome scope of the regulations that govern permissible patterns and sequences adds an element of complexity and creativity to SR Chess that is not found in Simplified SR (Common) Chess, and also accounts for the apparent sudden/strange (random) moves sometimes perceived by novices.


    Illegal Moves (Freezing)

    Newcomers will notice that simplified captures and retreats are sometimes deemed illegal in SR Chess. When a move that is legal in Simplified SR (Common) Chess, but illegal in SR Chess, the piece in question is said to be "frozen". In some traditions, "frozen" pieces are termed "stone-walled". "Freezing" of pieces typically occurs when moves are not sequenced according to the Nubular Rule, or when a Pattern of Unbalance is created. Unfreezing a piece is possible, but is dependent on the proportion of occupied white squares relative to occupied dark squares, and subject to the Rule of Double Diagonals.
  4. Standard member ark13
    Enola Straight
    12 May '05 21:42
    Originally posted by Bowmann
    The rules are indeed too numerous to post.
    See, this is what I mean. That's what everyone says. They must've all gotten together and agreed since it doesn't exist, and therefore doesn't really have rules; that they'd all refuse to post the rules because they're too complicated. It's the perfect practical joke.
  5. 12 May '05 21:50
    Try SchemingMind.com for the rules and a game. I did not understand the rules and stoped reading them. Did you see the Star Trek Poker game when Captain James T Kerk made up the games rules as the game was being played? Play a chess game like that and you have a Stanley Random Chess game. I am just kidding, but it sure seem like that is the way that game is played.
  6. Standard member buffalobill
    Major Bone
    12 May '05 22:54
    Sounds like Brockian Ultracricket or that game Calvin & Hobbes play. You make up the rules as you go ie it's a hoax. Enjoy it while it lasts or go with the flow.
  7. 12 May '05 23:39
    it's the chess equivalent of Mornington Crescent ... except that Mornington Crescent obviously does have real rules, honest
  8. 12 May '05 23:41
    Stanley Random Chess is sort of a joke. It's idea is based on the Stanley personality in Chessmaster, which you can play in the kids room. Stanley makes totally random, but legal, moves.
  9. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    13 May '05 00:12
    Originally posted by dpressnell
    Stanley Random Chess is sort of a joke. It's idea is based on the Stanley personality in Chessmaster, which you can play in the kids room. Stanley makes totally random, but legal, moves.
    A common misbelief. The following was written by a Stanley Random (SR) Grandmaster:


    Until recently, it was incorrectly supposed that Stanley Random Chess owed its humble origins to a monkey famously known as "Stanley," who first gained international prominence as the lowest rated personality in the world-famous Chessmaster software. He has an ELO of 1, and his moves are entirely random. The official Chessmaster documentation records his abilities as follows:

    "As a young chimp, Stanley wandered onto a game preserve in Africa where he met a boy named Justin. The two became fast friends. Stanley has shown Justin many chimpanzee pastimes like climbing trees and how to find the best bananas. In return, Justin has taught Stanley some human things, like how to program a VCR and how to play chess. Stanley absolutely refuses to play chess unless he gets to wear Justin`s propeller hat. Stanley knows how to move the pieces, but doesn`t really understand how to play chess."

    This is the Stanley that many uninformed players previously supposed to be the origin of Stanley Random Chess, but this conclusion is the result of the mistaken belief that SR Chess is a recent phenomenon and merely a variant of Simplified SR (Common) Chess. Following concentrated studies of the Stanley family in early Britain, recent scholarship has become convinced that the relationship between these two forms of chess is in fact reversed, and that SR Chess is the original form of the game from which Common Chess developed as a simplified form of the game. Naturally this eliminates any notion that the history of SR Chess began with a modern software primate.

    Goldman and Morgenstern provide solid evidence that the name "Stanley" originates with Sir Thomas Stanley (d. 1459), a descendant of William the Conqueror who excelled in SR Chess from an early age. Recently discovered ship logs confirm that William the Conqueror's pet monkey, named Stanley, accompanied him on the ship that arrived at Pevensy Bay on August 28, 1066, leading up to the Battle of Hastings. Following the success of the Norman Invasion and William's subsequent coronation, King William's beloved pet Stanley was known to accompany him on his tour through England. Following the death of Stanley, William assigned the name as an honorary title to one of the local families that had proved his strongest ally, from which time they became known as the Stanley family.

    The first mention of the game itself is found in historical accounts of the Ferrers family in 1137. The Stanley family apparently learned the game of SR Chess when they assumed the Earl of Derby title from the Ferrers in 1485. The Stanley family quickly developed a passionate love for SR Chess, and actively promoted the game, hosting annual tournaments for the Stanley Cup. In 1892, the Stanley Cup was sadly donated by the rebel Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley, from which time it was used as a trophy for amateur hockey in Canada. Frederick T. Stanley, who in 1843 founded The Stanley Works, at that time a bolt and door hardware manufacturing company located in New Britain, was responsible for popularizing SR Chess in America. Directors of his company (now renowned for making fine hand tools and industrial tools) are still known to play SR Chess in board meetings today.

    Until the 20th century, the game was simply known as Stanley Chess. When the popularity of the simplified form of the game (now known as Simplified SR Chess, or Common Chess) overtook the traditional form of the game, the original regulations that strictly governed the sequences and patterns of the original game (previously common knowledge) gradually were forgotten by the general chess playing public. To players of Common Chess not familiar with the body of laws that governed legal patterns and sequences, the unique play of Stanley Chess appeared obscure and "random", and so the game acquired the unfortunate designation "Stanley Random Chess" or SR Chess. Originally intended as an insult, the name has stuck, although it is a misnomer and SR Chess is certainly not random. The original form of the game is far more advanced and complex than Simplified SR (Common) Chess, and experts are agreed that the additional rules that govern move sequences and patterns lead to more creative and imaginative play than the adulterated and simplified form of the game that is commonly played around the world today.

    It is regrettable that much of the traditional SR Chess rules and terminology are unfamiliar to chess players today. This is the sad consequence of the Great SR Chess Purge in the mid-nineteenth century, which involved the systematic cleansing of SR Chess materials from libraries and schools, as a result of high ranking leaders developing a fierce antagonism toward the game. Sadly, this accounts for a great deal of the general public ignorance about SR Chess, and the popularity of its inferior and simplified variant, Common Chess.

    Recent times have seen the beginning of an acknowledgement of Common Chess's origins in SR Chess, and a renewed appreciation for SR Chess. In honour of William the Conqueror's pet monkey, the original Stanley, software developer UbiSoft has added a Stanley Random personality to its Chessmaster program, although this personality is not very competent at the game, and SR Chess rules are not enforced for human players.

    Since its humble beginning, SR Chess has experienced rapid growth and flourished especially in the late medieval era. But despite an evolutionary journey of progress from the original Stanley and the Stanley family, the game is yet to receive the universal recognition it richly deserves. In particular, the rise of Simplified SR (Common) Chess led to SR Chess seeing a significant decline in the number of players over the last few centuries. With the advent of playing opportunities on the internet, there is good reason today for optimism about renewed growth and appreciation for the original form of the game.

    SR Chess GM Gregory Topov
  10. 13 May '05 00:13
    will sum1 please clarify for me: the game of chess began as src and after a period of time became much much less complex, simplifying the rules from "volumes and volumes" (lets say hundreds of pages) to a single page. also, these "volumes and volumes" are "too complex" to be posted on the internet. for one, i would like sum1 to explain to me what the complexity level of the game has to do with the inability for an internet server to contain the rules of the game. also, would not the players have to memorize all the rules to be able to play he game properly??
  11. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    13 May '05 00:27
    Originally posted by bobbob1056th
    will sum1 please clarify for me: the game of chess began as src and after a period of time became much much less complex, simplifying the rules from "volumes and volumes" (lets say hundreds of pages) to a single page. also, these "volumes and volumes" are "too complex" to be posted on the internet. for one, i would like sum1 to explain to me wha ...[text shortened]... also, would not the players have to memorize all the rules to be able to play he game properly??
    SchemingMind.com has, at this time, the only XML SRC rule parser to control the games. Without that facility an array of several hundred servers would be required to host the games on the site.
  12. 13 May '05 03:59
    Why are you people entertaining this nonsense?
  13. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    13 May '05 05:30
    I guess I'll play Mornington Cresent for the win using the "Isolated Island Chain" rule.
  14. 13 May '05 10:24
    i got a good laugh out of this: Stanley Random Chess is sort of a joke. It's idea is based on the Stanley personality in Chessmaster, which you can play in the kids room. Stanley makes totally random, but legal, moves.
  15. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    13 May '05 11:12
    There's a game currently under way at SchemingMind.com, for those interested in following it. It is annotated by the players.