Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 15 Feb '06 13:16
    I'd like to hear about when others have had 'aaah I see!!' moments in their chess education, what was the realisation that you made and did you notice an immediate improvement in your games and results. Examples are an understanding of where bishops are better than knight, the opposition, colour complexes, that sort of thing.
  2. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    15 Feb '06 13:31
    Originally posted by Knightlore
    I'd like to hear about when others have had 'aaah I see!!' moments in their chess education, what was the realisation that you made and did you notice an immediate improvement in your games and results. Examples are an understanding of where bishops are better than knight, the opposition, colour complexes, that sort of thing.
    I first learned chess in a couple of games when I was 8. Nothing
    happened chesswise till college, 10 years later. I was learning again,
    and they mentioned rooks were stronger than bishops. So being
    a pragmatic and curious type, played a few games where I arranged
    a trade between my rooks and his bishops to see what would happen.
    Lo and behold, I found out they were right, but when I first looked at
    the concept, I saw the bishops and rooks covered the same number
    of squares, at least 2 rooks v 2 bishops so had to have it proven
    the rooks were stronger. Thats when I noticed a rook could
    cover both colors but a bishop was stuck on one color. It was an
    interesting experiment.
  3. 15 Feb '06 13:34
    Currently reading "The Amateur's Mind: Turning Chess Misconceptions into Chess Mastery" by Jeremy Silman.

    There were moments like that, for example, using well placed pawns to stop your opponent getting strong knight positions. Also identifying bad and good bishops, and what situations a bad bishop can actually be good.

    Also there were a lot of those moments when going through the lessons on this site:

    http://www.chesstactics.org/