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  1. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    27 Aug '08 19:30
    ok, so i played around on blitz sites then dropped pieces like crazy against easier players at chess club. so im a little angry

    so this morning i went to make a unified order of thinking to not only stop the mistakes but to improve.

    heres what i have so far.

    [opponent moves]
    1.briefly consider why opponent did that move.
    2.opponents capturing threats (save vs. unsafe)
    3.opponents checking threats
    4.tactics-forks,pins,skewers,discoveries,removal of guard,etc.
    5.candidate moves (3)
    6.capturing threats to each c. move
    7.checking threats to each c. move
    8.decide and move


    what do you think? better ording of stuff or missing a step? id like to hear what some people think
  2. 27 Aug '08 19:38
    9.Take a break every now and then

    Sometimes playing too long can really hurt your game. That's why I take long breaks every now and then and when I come back I play better than ever.
  3. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    27 Aug '08 19:47
    Originally posted by Best101
    9.Take a break every now and then

    Sometimes playing too long can really hurt your game. That's why I take long breaks every now and then and when I come back I play better than ever.
    i had a big break in may, and some mini ones lately..
    and that is true, when i came back i did very well

    ive changed it a little-

    [opponent moves]
    1.briefly consider why opponent did that move.
    2.opponents capturing threats (safe vs. unsafe)
    3.opponents checking threats
    4.tactics-forks,pins,skewers,discoveries,removal of guard,trapping,mating pattern.
    5.candidate moves (3)
    6.capturing threats to each c. move
    7.checking threats to each c. move
    8.decide and move
  4. 27 Aug '08 19:55 / 1 edit
    you should at least include a positional assessment of the position before going over to candidate moves.

    Seems to me like you're overly concentrating on tactics. If you're worried about your tactics skills, just practise them. Then practise some more. It'll get better in time. There's no magic trick to stop any tactical mistakes whatsoever.
  5. Standard member irontigran
    Rob Scheider is..
    27 Aug '08 20:44
    Originally posted by schakuhr
    you should at least include a positional assessment of the position before going over to candidate moves.

    Seems to me like you're overly concentrating on tactics. If you're worried about your tactics skills, just practise them. Then practise some more. It'll get better in time. There's no magic trick to stop any tactical mistakes whatsoever.
    yeah, thats what im trying to figure out how to put in.. maybe after the 1st tactical step?
    my tactics are actually not that bad, i can do a great deal of CTart and chesstempo problems with a higher rating.. im just hoping organization wiill improve
  6. 27 Aug '08 21:15
    My basic thought processes go as follows;

    When it's my opponent's turn to move:-
    -consider the general features of the position; do I know what I'm supposed to do/try to do (strategy or 'overall' plan)-try to narrow down the candidate moves which fit in with this plan. (I also consider this from my opponents point of view-very important!)

    When it's my turn to move:-
    -look more closely at candidate moves and start calculating and assessing the positions these moves might lead to.

    Fairly basic formula I guess, but it seems to work OK for me.
  7. 27 Aug '08 21:56
    Originally posted by streetfighter
    My basic thought processes go as follows;

    When it's my opponent's turn to move:-
    -consider the general features of the position; do I know what I'm supposed to do/try to do (strategy or 'overall' plan)-try to narrow down the candidate moves which fit in with this plan. (I also consider this from my opponents point of view-very important! ...[text shortened]... hese moves might lead to.

    Fairly basic formula I guess, but it seems to work OK for me.
    Always asume your opponent's last move was a mistake, even if it's the move you expected them to make. Not an easy thing to do - it takes a fair bit of practice, but if you go to the board with a critical mind, you're more likely to spot flaws and errors
  8. 28 Aug '08 06:53
    If your opponent's move was the expected one, skip the whole thing and just revalidate your last idea, possibly one or more moves deeper.
  9. 28 Aug '08 08:57
    Originally posted by irontigran
    yeah, thats what im trying to figure out how to put in.. maybe after the 1st tactical step?
    my tactics are actually not that bad, i can do a great deal of CTart and chesstempo problems with a higher rating.. im just hoping organization wiill improve
    When I'm clueless I also use a thinking technique, taught to me by a GM.

    1) a brief overview of the position; note down things like king safety, material balance, development, pawn structure, bishop pair, outposts, passed pawns, open files and who controls them etc.

    2) opponent's possibilities

    3) tactics alert

    4) pick at least 3 candidate moves

    5) calculate the lines resulting from them

    6) choose your move
  10. 28 Aug '08 11:18
    Here's a great system to try:

    http://home.worldonline.dk/kfyhn/VikingChess/RussellBlack/Article1.htm
  11. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    28 Aug '08 12:30 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by irontigran
    ok, so i played around on blitz sites then dropped pieces like crazy against easier players at chess club. so im a little angry

    so this morning i went to make a unified order of thinking to not only stop the mistakes but to improve.

    heres what i have so far.

    [opponent moves]
    1.briefly consider why opponent did that move.
    2.opponents capturi ...[text shortened]... t do you think? better ording of stuff or missing a step? id like to hear what some people think
    All of the above I would think, but just out of curiosity, do you know about space point count? It's an exercise that if done properly, and in speed chess I know that is difficult, but it tells what the 1st order threats are on the board. Space Points=what the opponent attacks on your side of the board, board split up like, a1-a4= white side, a5-a8= black side.
    so white goes e4 and white gets 5 space points, from a bishop, the queen and the pawn itself at e4 gives two, one at d5 the other at f5. The point of this exercise is to be able to basically see all of them in a flash, not having to add up each point separately. It tells you at least if one of your pieces is in immediate danger from a piece on the other side of the board, maybe on a diagonal from a bishop on C8 or some such. You may already be advanced enough not to need to study it but its a thought. You just add up the points for each side, total points and attack and defend doesn't matter for the purpose of space point counts, so say you have a pawn attacking f5 and d5, its at E4 and you are white, then if the opponent has 4 pieces defending those two squares, it does not change the space point count, you still get 2 from that pawn.
    So if you have say, 6 space points and your opponent has 16, you know you are most likely in deep doo doo and need to generate SOMETHING fast!
  12. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    28 Aug '08 12:38
    Originally posted by schakuhr
    When I'm clueless I also use a thinking technique, taught to me by a GM.

    1) a brief overview of the position; note down things like king safety, material balance, development, pawn structure, bishop pair, outposts, passed pawns, open files and who controls them etc.

    2) opponent's possibilities

    3) tactics alert

    4) pick at least 3 candidate moves

    5) calculate the lines resulting from them

    6) choose your move
    Is it advisible to do that on EVERY move in long games ?
  13. 28 Aug '08 13:17
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Is it advisible to do that on EVERY move in long games ?
    If you are clueless on every move, yes.
  14. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    28 Aug '08 13:24 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by heinzkat
    If you are clueless on every move, yes.
    I am saying not because I think that it is neccesary of every move but if you do something every move it becomes your second nature.

    Example, it is easy to check for blunders and examine possible checks but it is easy to simple forget that helpful routine if you don't do it all the time.

    I am soon starting to play real OTB games so I want to develop solid thinking habits.
  15. 28 Aug '08 13:42
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    I am saying not because I think that it is neccesary of every move but if you do something every move it becomes your second nature.

    Example, it is easy to check for blunders and examine possible checks but it is easy to simple forget that helpful routine if you don't do it all the time.

    I am soon starting to play real OTB games so I want to develop solid thinking habits.
    I use it primarily for OTB games. If you use it every move you will waste far too much time on it. Your evaluation of the position isn't going to change every move.

    I think you should mainly use it when deciding on a plan; for example early in the middlegame, you just finished your development and you need to decide whether you're going to advance on the queenside, if you should ignore your opponent's activity on the kingside. Use it for positions where there are several moves worth looking into.